archive-org.com » ORG » F » FNPP.ORG

Total: 43

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    curriculum development The circle has been broken for so long our ancestral traditions have been put aside for so long that the students need time especially in the beginning Time to recover who they are Time to see that they are being asked and being given an opportunity to inherit all the accumulated wisdom of all the generations of people in our Nation who have gone before them Time to grow into being the leaders in our community that they will become Louise Underwood Intergenerational Facilitator Cowichan Tribes In the First Nations Partnership Programs some students were receptive and welcoming to Elders roles as co constructors of the curriculum But others reported that they had strong doubts about whether the old ways could have any value or relevance to themselves their families or their future careers in child and youth care The program evaluation underscored the importance to students and instructors of being able to discuss Elders contributions with the Intergenerational Facilitator and to seek advice on cultural protocol for meeting with Elders As well the individuals who were most effective in bridging gaps across generations found ways to help students to tolerate ambiguities in the Elders often indirect teaching

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/interg2.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive


  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    language and know our culture will be stronger Christine Leo employment and training director Mount Currie First Nation In all of the communities success was gauged by the positive overall development seen in students even in those who did not complete the whole program and in community mobilization and organization to improve conditions for children and families Most important was the fact that 95 of program graduates remained in their communities thereby strengthening community capacity to provide culturally appropriate services for children and families As many evaluation participants noted there are few if any benefits to the community when students either go away to attend university and don t return or come back in the words of an Elder as strangers with alien ideas The overwhelming majority of program graduates responding to open ended questions about their experiences of the training program reported direct effects of program participation including enhanced self esteem restored cultural identity and pride improved parenting effectiveness and greater self confidence with respect to their abilities as learners and as leaders in the field of children s services and children s development Overall program graduates viewed success in terms of both academic achievements and their emerging roles as community advocates and respected resources for family members and friends Program instructors linked the training program to positive growth in students critical thinking communication skills and self confidence social cohesion particularly among students within the cohort and between students and elders cultural revitalization and cultural healing Instructors attributed many of these changes to the cohort delivery of the program Regular meetings together in a facility typically one large room used especially for the program provided the time and space to develop a climate of cultural safety in discussions to provide reliable support in working through memories of childhood traumas

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/progout.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    in British Columbia in Early Childhood Education ECE certification issued by the Ministry of Health 77 3 of students completed a full two years to achieve a Diploma in Child and Youth Care compared with a national completion rate of 40 and below among First Nations students in other post secondary programs 95 of program graduates remained in their own communities 65 of graduates introduced new programs for children youth

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/edout.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    students laddered on to third and fourth years of university study towards a degree mainly in education At Onion Lake First Nation with a population of approximately 1700 half of the program graduates were hired as staff at child care programs in their villages and others became assistants atthe community school Seven graduates continued with First Nations Partnership Programs in a pilot project that enables them to work towards a degree in Child and Youth Care using a mix of traditional correspondence course packages and group support structures Evidence collected to date indicates that the traditional packages are problematic and that a GCM 3rd and 4th year is the preferred option if funds can be located for their development Program graduates in the partnership with Nzen man Child and FamilyServices are involved in a variety of centred based and family day careprograms and after school care as well as mobile programs reaching out to children and families in remote rural areas Mid way through the Tl azt en Nation partnership for example students became involved in planning and naming the community s first day care centre negotiating contracts with a local cabinet making training program to provide furniture and toys for the facility and developing operational policies and procedures They created curriculum activities that are now being used to teach young children their traditional Carrier language and to promote positive self identity as Tl azt enne people Some of the students supervised practica training took place at the Sumyaz meaning Little Star facility and program graduates subsequently took on the operation of the day care with the support of the community All of the program graduates at Tl azt en Nation found employment at the new Sumyaz Daycare and Aboriginal Head Start program on their reserve that they had helped

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/vocout.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    are now raising their own children This evaluation finding has particular importance for our training programs because most of the students were mothers and several were grandmothers In the four most recent partnerships 53 students were parents or grandparents to 186 children In a total population of approximately 5 100 this represents a substantial impact Effects of the program on parenting were accounted for by most participants with reference to the program content in which they explored their own parenting experiences and develop new understandings about how they could support children s optimal development in the context of a strong family life However an enabling condition for direct impacts on parenting was that the students did not need to leave their families in order to participate in the program affording them ample ongoing opportunities for practice feedback and reflection on their child care practices Residential school trauma Residential school trauma was a recurrent theme in the collected data emerging through interviews with students instructors and other community members Reams of poignant testimony have been collected in many different venues across Canada over the years describing the suffering to parents to children and to communities of residential schooling child welfare practices and other helping services deemed by governments and non government organizations at the time to be in the best interests of Canada s aboriginal people Many graduates talked about having missed the foundational experiences of being parented effectively Some had been forced to attend residential schools off reserve as children others were raised by parents who had attended residential schools The profound and deeply distressing legacy of residential schooling trauma emerged in reflections on course work discussions with instructors and Elders and self assessment of the changes they experienced during the training programs Many program graduates recounted feeling considerable emotional

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/ch.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    of the First Nations Partnership Programs upon social inclusion was vividly illustrated when several program graduates took up their place at the table at two province wide conferences on Early Childhood Education and on Aboriginal Child Care Graduates spoke out on issues of funding for child care and training and presented a range of ideas for responding to cultural diversity in child care programs As an outcome social inclusion refers to recognition and participation of community members and of university partners in each other s venues and in the society at large The First Nations Partnership Programs demonstrate that First Nations people have the public will and the social cohesion to take the driver s seat on this journey Despite considerable differences among our partners in terms of their infrastructure location economic status and existing services for children and families all of the partnership initiatives engendered unprecedented success for students and for the community as a whole The program evaluation showed what can happen when Early Childhood Education and Youth Care training is envisioned and implemented as a community development tool Most importantly the research process has clarified what guides the process how the pieces fit together to realize community identified goals and strategies building upon and expanding social cohesion and social inclusion which in turn creates developmentally supportive ecologies for children and families Being responsive to indigenous communities means more than letting community members voice their concerns or preferences more than acknowledging diversity The evaluation project underscored the need for institutions involved in education human services and development assistance to open up the very foundations of how training programs are conceived and how optimal developmental outcomes are defined As Vern Bachiu the programs and policy director for the Meadow Lake Tribal Council put it What we are trying to

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/cd.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    of Canada http www nfb ca National Parent Information Network NPIN http www npin org Turtle Island Native Network http www turtleisland org Unicef http www unicef org http www unicef org teachers Westcoast Child Care Resource Centre http www wstcoast org The Work Life Compendium 2001 http www worklifecanada ca families shtml Zero to Three National Center for Infants Toddlers and Families http www zerotothree org Professional Associations Links Aboriginal Head Start Association of British Columbia http www ahsabc ca The Association for Child Youth Care Practice Inc http www acycp org BC Aboriginal Child Care Society http www acc society bc ca The Canadian Association for Young Children http www cayc ca The Canadian Child and Youth Care Network http www geocities com chen chi 99 Child Family Canada http www cfc efc ca The Early Childhood Educators of BC ECEBC http www cfc efc ca ecebc The International Child and Youth Care Network CYC Net http www cyc net org Manitoba Child Care Association MCCA http www mccahouse org World Association of Early Childhood Educators http www waece com Policy Links Assembly of First Nations AFN http www afn ca BC Council for Families http www bccf bc ca Caledon Institute of Social Policy http www caledoninst org Campaign 2000 http www campaign2000 ca Canadian Institute of Child Health CICH http www cich ca Canadian Policy Research Networks http www cprn com Child Rights Information Network CRIN http www crin org Childwatch International Research Network http www childwatch uio no Education Week on the Web http www edweek org First Call http www firstcallbc org Global ChildNet http edie cprost sfu ca gcnet Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care http www childcareontario org Financial Links The Atkinson Charitable Foundation http www atkinsonfdn on ca Inter America Development

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/resources.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive



  • (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /CBCYCDP.HTM (2016-02-09)




  •