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  • It Takes a Village to Build a Porch « Friends of Wissahickon
    that space he says The new Tree House porch does more than provide additional space for environmental education programs It gives the Tree House staff the opportunity to educate visitors on the benefits of green roofs Green roofs absorb rainwater instead of letting it with the pollutants it carries run into storm drains and waterways Plants and bacteria that live in the soil filter rainwater before it flows into the landscape Native plantings host beneficial insects and provide food and habitat for other wildlife In hot summer months green roofs absorb far less heat than traditional building materials like wood or asphalt shingles This reduces cooling costs and overall energy consumption Visitors to the Tree House will learn all of this and more The Wissahickon Environmental Center connects with a truly unique trail resource adjacent to a remarkable section of the park with a beautiful meadow It is also positioned at the intersection of Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties This makes it a part of Philadelphia that is frequently visited by residents of the suburbs and thereby expands the Wissahickon Valley Park community The Andorra Natural Area is a bridging zone of the park says McCarthy We welcome all our Philadelphia friends and suburban neighbors to visit and enjoy this inspirational project at one of the most loved landmarks in the Wissahickon Green Roof Fast Facts The roof was established with eight varieties of sedum cuttings and a few perennial plugs The plants can survive in extreme conditions The roof supports an additional twenty two pounds per square foot the weight of the green roof when it is fully saturated The protective vegetation will extend the life of the roof by two to three times The green roof installation took a day and a half According to Nate Johnson from Roofmeadow Services Inc workers had to use a ladder and a hand hoist to pull all the soil and stone up to the roof in buckets Maintenance of the green roof will require three to four visits a year FOW Project Manager Henry Stroud contributed to this article Growing up at the Tree House James Lupica grew up in the Tree House the building that houses the Wissahickon Environmental Center He lived there from the age of 12 until he married in 1956 at the age of 21 His family remained in the house until the Houston family donated the land to Fairmount Park Mr Lupica is a retired carpenter and lives with his wife Laura in Wyndmoor Below are highlights from a conversation he had with Denise Larrabee FOW Editor Writer Life at the Tree House I was born in an old stone house burnt down now It was less than a hundred yards from the Tree House We moved out of there to the Tree House when I was about twelve We lived there my brother sister and I and my mother and father and my grandfather Any nursery employee could rent those houses on the property and live

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/846-2/ (2016-04-26)
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  • FOW Increases Presence in the Park with Field Assistants « Friends of Wissahickon
    was able to hire three seasonal employees who worked full time in the park from June through August clearing trails and maintaining the area around Devil s Pool As they cleared trails and educated park users about the rules and regulations at Devil s Pool the crew served as a daily FOW presence in the Wissahickon Wearing FOW staff t shirts and work pants they were able to help with daily trash removal from Devil s Pool as well as sight line clearing keeping brush off and away from the trails They have been the eyes and ears of the park says Henry Stroud FOW Project Manager They have been liaisons between park users and FOW and have been a great conveyor of information to us The public has seen an FOW presence in the park as never before With such heavy use during the summer Devil s Pool quickly becomes littered with trash The crew was able to tend to this daily including on Saturdays As a result FOW was able to remove garbage from the site several times throughout the day The crew also served as a frequent presence in the Devil s Pool area talked with people about park rules and regulations and reminded them of the risks of swimming in the area According to Stroud FOW hopes to hire a seasonal crew to work in the park during the summer of 2016 and will be hiring for these positions in the spring Tags 0 comments Leave a comment Click here to cancel reply Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Apr 30th Creek Cleanup Apr 30th Woodland Wildflower hike with Don Simon Susan Simon and Lisa Kolker Apr 30th Kid Friendly Hike with Marv Schwartz View more events

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/fow-increases-presence-in-the-park-with-field-assistants/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Houston Meadow Trail Restoration « Friends of Wissahickon
    Meadow trail is open to all trail users but sees a disproportionate amount of horse and bicycle traffic which cause more soil compaction and displacement than human feet alone In comparison bikes cause medium soil compaction and displacement while horses cause very high compaction and high displacement Soil is also displaced by rain By definition meadows have a low percentage of tree canopy Trees protect trails from splash erosion erosion caused by drops of water hitting bare soil by slowing down and intercepting rain before it reaches the ground Well built trails are carefully engineered to shed water and provide a stable tread but excess soil displacement can change the shape of the trail enough to destroy these properties Splash erosion sliding bicycle tires and clomping hooves all likely contributed to the quick displacement of soils on the Houston Meadow trail and to the formation of numerous troughs with bermed sides Once formed the troughs concentrated stormwater flows lead to increased erosion In just a few years large sections of the trail in Houston Meadow had become deeply eroded How did FOW restore the trails To begin sight lines along the trail were aggressively cleared Increased sight lines decrease the likelihood one park user will crash into another and diminish the need to change speeds quickly Slamming on brakes or moving a horse quickly to avoid a collision are both factors that increase soil displacement and contribute to a bad trail experience Next FOW built a series of terrace steps out of black locust a naturally rot resistant material harvested from the park These steps serve two very important functions First they minimize running trail grade or reduce the steepness of the trail The steeper a trail is the more likely it is to erode with the potential for erosion

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/houston-meadow-trail-restoration/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Valley Green Road Walkway Stabilization « Friends of Wissahickon
    Wissahickon Creek to the upper Valley Green Road parking lot P 9 It is a vital trail connection that links P 9 the orange and white blazed trails and a number of important natural and historic features of the Wissahickon Valley Park to Valley Green Inn the parks most popular destination Two sections of a stone retaining wall that support the walkway collapsed after heavy rains in 2004 These sections were spanned in 2004 by a wooden walkway built by FOW volunteers Yet due to its uneven and narrow tread the walkway presents an obstacle for park users particularly those who are mobility impaired cyclists and equestrians More recently the failure of stormwater control infrastructure on Valley Green Road and the continued erosion of the stream channel beneath the wall have caused additional sections to collapse In April of 2015 a large portion fell into the stream causing a partial failure of the wooden walkway creating conditions that are too dangerous to allow it to remain open to park users The trail remains closed indefinitely FOW has developed concept level designs and are actively seeking funds to stabilize the stream channel and replace the trail with an elevated boardwalk that would span approximately 175 feet Structural improvements to the adjacent street and stormwater sewer will also be necessary Tags FOW Parking valley green 0 comments Leave a comment Click here to cancel reply Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Apr 30th Creek Cleanup Apr 30th Woodland Wildflower hike with Don Simon Susan Simon and Lisa Kolker Apr 30th Kid Friendly Hike with Marv Schwartz View more events News 2016 Biennial Wissahickon Photo Contest News April 11 2016 Walnut Lane Bridge to Close for Six Months News March 29 2016 Spring Ephemerals

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/valley-green-road-walkway-stabilization/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Wissahickon East Park Small Area Plan « Friends of Wissahickon
    Park also known as Wissahickon East Park was acquired by the City of Philadelphia in 2013 after a lengthy campaign by the Wissahickon East Project a community group focused on its continued preservation The property is comprised of six acres of woodlands parallel to the old Reading Railroad right of way south east of Cresheim Valley Drive It is accessible via entry at the intersection of Woodbrook Lane and Anderson Street in East Mount Airy Cresheim Creek a tributary of Wissahickon Creek runs through the property Using funding provided by the City of Philadelphia FOW will lead a small area planning process for the newly acquired parcel The plan will Identify community goals for the park Develop a cohesive vision Describe existing conditions and provide a detailed base map which identifies the physical and biological features of the site Provide an assessment of the condition of existing PWD infrastructure sewer and outfall at the upper end of the park site and suggest design strategies for rehabilitation Conduct a geomorphic and hydrologic evaluation of the property which identifies critical erosion areas both along the stream channel and on adjacent land Where necessary develop concept level designs for stream channel stabilization Identify and describe restoration opportunities for upland areas of the park Develop a proposed implementation schedule indicating the appropriate sequence of development activities Tags 0 comments Leave a comment Click here to cancel reply Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Apr 30th Creek Cleanup Apr 30th Woodland Wildflower hike with Don Simon Susan Simon and Lisa Kolker Apr 30th Kid Friendly Hike with Marv Schwartz View more events News 2016 Biennial Wissahickon Photo Contest News April 11 2016 Walnut Lane Bridge to Close for Six Months News March 29 2016 Spring Ephemerals

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/wissahickon-east-park-small-area-plan/ (2016-04-26)
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  • News « Friends of Wissahickon
    Reduction Project Current Projects August 31 2015 Forbidden Drive Trail Stabilization Project Current Projects August 31 2015 Philadelphia magazine features FOW s work in Devil s Pool Trail Work August 18 2015 Free Ice Cream at FOW s 9th Annual Ice Cream Social News August 17 2015 Raising the green roof on the Wissahickon Environmental Center News August 12 2015 A Creek in Crisis Time for Action Newsletter June 11 2015 Park Signage History An Appreciation News May 18 2015 Wissahickon Part of PPR s Forest Management Program Newsletter May 02 2015 Top Ten Tips for Staying Well in the Spring Newsletter April 05 2015 Springtime at the Pond Conservation March 11 2015 Newer Posts Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Apr 30th Creek Cleanup Apr 30th Woodland Wildflower hike with Don Simon Susan Simon and Lisa Kolker Apr 30th Kid Friendly Hike with Marv Schwartz View more events News 2016 Biennial Wissahickon Photo Contest News April 11 2016 Walnut Lane Bridge to Close for Six Months News March 29 2016 Spring Ephemerals in the Wissahickon Nature March 23 2016 See more news Follow FOW FOW on Facebook FOW on Instagram

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/news/page/3/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Events for February 2016 « Friends of Wissahickon
    Share via Email Events Find Events Events In Search Events for February 2016 Calendar Month Navigation January March Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 31 1 2 3 4 Maple Trees and Trea 5 6 7 8 9 10 Wissahickon Walkers 11 12 13 Our History Our Par 14 15 16 17 Wissahickon Walkers 18 19 20 Gorgeous Gorge with 21 Cedars Talks We hav 22 23 24 25 Woodmere Winter Memb 26 27 Maple Sugar Day 28 Cedars Talks Roads 29 Watershed Quizzo wit 1 2 Wissahickon Walkers 3 4 5 Calendar Month Navigation January March Export Month s Events Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Jun 29th Wissahickon Walkers Jun 25th Know Your Bugs Jun 22nd Wissahickon Walkers View more events News 2016 Biennial Wissahickon Photo Contest News April 11 2016 Walnut Lane Bridge to Close for Six Months News March 29 2016 Spring Ephemerals in the Wissahickon Nature March 23 2016 See more news Follow FOW FOW on Facebook FOW on Instagram Ongoing Projects We need volunteers to help restore structures repair stone work and rebuild trails Volunteer Get involved Become a member today Nut in is

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/events/2016-02/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Events for April 2016 « Friends of Wissahickon
    May Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 27 Basics of Birding an 28 29 30 31 1 2 Native Seed Craft 3 Woods and Meadow Hik Trails Less Traveled Cedars Talk Butterf 4 5 Valley Talks Plannin 6 7 8 9 Bird Box Building Wo 10 Trails Less Traveled 11 12 13 14 15 16 Currently Exposed Ro Spring Awakening in Trail Maintenance 17 Bike the Hill 18 19 20 21 Thursday Tots April 22 Dancing With the Toa 23 Fishing the Wissahic Earth Day Trail Work 24 Meadow Bird Walk Basics of Birding an 25 26 27 28 29 30 Creek Cleanup Woodland Wildflower Kid Friendly Hike wi Calendar Month Navigation March May Export Month s Events Categories Select a category Uncategorized Trail Work Current Projects Conservation News Nature Newsletter Restoration Events Jun 29th Wissahickon Walkers Jun 25th Know Your Bugs Jun 22nd Wissahickon Walkers View more events News 2016 Biennial Wissahickon Photo Contest News April 11 2016 Walnut Lane Bridge to Close for Six Months News March 29 2016 Spring Ephemerals in the Wissahickon Nature March 23 2016 See more news Follow FOW FOW on Facebook FOW on Instagram Ongoing Projects We need volunteers to help restore

    Original URL path: http://fow.org/events/2016-04/ (2016-04-26)
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