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  • Earthquake tech can ID different shocks and booms - Futurity
    Washington University in St Louis right Original Study Posted by Diana Lutz WUSTL on December 23 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license On October 10 2006 a mortar round hit the ammunition supply depot at the US Forward Operating Base Falcon south of Baghdad The round started a smoldering fire punctuated by whizzing skyrockets a rain of incandescent fragments and massive explosions that bloomed into mushroom clouds Soldiers who videotaped the cook off can be heard wondering what exactly was in the dump and how much longer the explosions would continue Warning video contains strong language But the soldiers weren t the only ones recording the cook off A seismometer just four miles away was also registering every boom and shock The seismometer was one of 10 installed in 2005 and 2006 in northern and northeastern Iraq to study the seismic properties of the Earth s crust in that area so that it would be possible to quantify the yield of nearby earthquakes or nuclear tests The principal investigator on the team that deployed the seismometers was Ghassan I Aleqabi a seismic deployment coordinator in the department of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St Louis Installing and maintaining instruments in war torn Iraq was sometimes a hair raising business Installation of the seismometer that recorded the cook off had to be delayed until April 2006 because it was dangerous even to enter the city And once deployed the seismometers which recorded 100 samples per second filled their hard drives in a few months so someone had to return to the sites to bring out the data How mutant plants could clean up explosives Then the ammunition dump went up Aleqabi and his colleague Michael Wysession professor of earth and planetary sciences were curious and decided to see if the seismometer had recorded the cook off Sure enough you could see a whole sequence of explosions Wysession says They report what they found online in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America It was an accident that we got such a rich recording Wysession says But sometimes science works that way you get lucky Dissecting the explosions Analyzing the record in various ways they found that some types of weapons jumped right out at them Mortar fire has a very specific signature that is always the same Wysession says If you make a spectrogram which breaks out the signal into different frequencies you see that the firing of the mortar produces one set of frequencies and the case splintering around the explosive produces another When you see those signals you know that s a mortar firing You can begin to pick out what s going on Passing helicopters produced swooping S curves in the seismograms as they moved toward and away from the seismometer and their dominant frequency dropped the same effect that makes the siren on an emergency vehicle drop in pitch You can look at how

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/explosions-ammunition-seismology-1076992-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Nope, 1951 Explorers Club dinner didn't include mammoth - Futurity
    in spaghetti but they tell you it s brains In this case everyone actually believed it says Matt Davis Credit iStockphoto Nope 1951 Explorers Club dinner didn t include mammoth Yale University right Original Study Posted by Jim Shelton Yale on February 8 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A famous morsel of meat left over from a 1951 Explorers Club dinner is not in fact a hunk of woolly mammoth It is green sea turtle meat most likely set aside from the soup course The event held Jan 13 1951 in the Grand Ballroom of the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City featured a dinner of Pacific spider crabs green turtle soup bison steaks and portions of a 250 000 year old woolly mammoth that had been preserved in glacial ice At least that s what the menu claimed To me this was a joke that no one got Others in attendance at the dinner thought the main entrée was meat from an extinct giant ground sloth I m sure people wanted to believe it They had no idea that many years later a PhD student would come along and figure this out with DNA sequencing techniques says Jessica Glass a graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University The surviving portion of the mystery meat served at the Explorers Club Annual Dinner in 1951 The jar is housed in the Yale Peabody Museum Credit Matt Davis Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University To me this was a joke that no one got says Matt Davis a Yale graduate student in geology and geophysics It s like a Halloween party where you put your hand in spaghetti but they tell you it s brains In this case everyone actually believed it Reports at the time said the Reverend Bernard Hubbard a much publicized Alaskan explorer and lecturer known as the Glacier Priest had supplied the mammoth meat for the banquet The frozen beast allegedly had been found at Woolly Cove on Akutan Island in the Aleutians and shipped to New York by US Navy Captain George Francis Kosco Math proves ancient cats could hunt mammoths The banquet s promoter Commander Wendell Phillips Dodge was a noted impresario and former agent for film star Mae West He sent out press notices saying the annual dinner would feature prehistoric meat Some attendees took this to mean woolly mammoth meat while others believed they were being served meat from the giant ground sloth known as Megatherium This was scientifically important because although sloths extended into Alaska Megatherium s range was thought to be restricted to South America A club member unable to attend the dinner Paul Griswold Howes of the Bruce Museum in Greenwich Conn requested that a piece of meat be saved for him to display at the museum Dodge personally filled out the specimen label for the fibrous chunk of muscle saying it was Megatherium Prehistoric meat Yet

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/explorers-club-mammoth-rumors-1102232/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Henry VIII likely had same brain injury seen in NFL players - Futurity
    Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Calming drug prevents PTSD dance Do painkiller risks outweigh rewards Tackle aging itself not just diseases Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Traumatic brain injury explains the memory problems explosive anger inability to control impulses headaches insomnia and maybe even impotence that afflicted Henry during the decade before his death in 1547 says Arash Salardini Credit Wikimedia Commons Henry VIII likely had same brain injury seen in NFL players Yale University Posted by Bill Hathaway Yale on February 5 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Henry VIII may have suffered repeated traumatic brain injuries similar to those experienced by NFL players and others who receive repeated blows to the head a new study suggests Traumatic brain injury explains the memory problems explosive anger inability to control impulses headaches insomnia and maybe even impotence that afflicted Henry during the decade before his death in 1547 The English monarch s increasingly unpredictable behavior may have been triggered by an accident during a jousting match in January of 1536 when a horse fell on Henry causing him to lose consciousness for two hours Credit Brett Davis Flickr It is intriguing to think that modern European history may have changed forever because of a blow to the head says Arash Salardini a behavioral neurologist and co director of the Yale University Memory Clinic The English monarch is best known for his dispute with the Catholic Church over his desire to annul his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn The affair led to the English Reformation and the creation of the Church of England Henry would marry six times and execute two of his wives It is intriguing to think that modern European history may have changed forever because of a blow to the head For the study published online in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience researchers analyzed volumes of Henry s letters and other historical sources to document his known medical history and events that may have contributed to his ailments Their findings confirm conjecture by some historians that jousting injuries caused later health and behavioral problems Henry suffered two major head injuries during his 30s In 1524 a lance penetrated the visor of his helmet during a jousting tournament and dazed him A year later

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/henry-viii-brain-injury-1101192-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 25 questions predict if depression meds will help - Futurity
    California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Fed fiber killer cells may ward off cancer How high blood sugar throws off heart rhythm Fewer blood cells may signal preeclampsia Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print These are questions any patient can fill out in 5 or 10 minutes on any laptop or smartphone and get a prediction immediately says Adam Chekroud Credit Ales Krivec Unsplash 25 questions predict if depression meds will help Yale University right Original Study Posted by Bill Hathaway Yale on January 22 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A simple questionnaire filled out by people suffering from depression can help identify whether a particular medication is likely to help them Researchers say data mined from clinical trials could soon help doctors tailor antidepressant therapy to their patients Currently only about 30 percent of patients get relief from the first drug they are prescribed and it can often take a year or more before doctors find the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/depression-medication-surveys-1094792/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Monkeys get spiteful when others have more - Futurity
    Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Watch these spinning dots flock like birds For primates parasites are the cost of learning Need nanotubes Go fly a kite Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print We punish those who take resources unfairly and those who intend to do mean things to others Many researchers have wondered whether this motivation is unique to our species says Laurie Santos Credit iStockphoto Monkeys get spiteful when others have more Yale University right Original Study Posted by Bill Hathaway Yale on January 11 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Just like people some monkeys will take the time and effort to punish others who get more than their fair share In fact they can act downright spiteful Capuchin monkeys will yank on a rope to collapse a table that is holding a partner monkey s food

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/monkeys-spiteful-punish-1088882-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 'Khushi Baby' necklace keeps track of immunizations - Futurity
    Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles To locate damaged DNA amplify it Web calculator flags cancer risks early Malaria Is crossbreeding a game changer Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print About 500 children in India are currently wearing the Khushi Baby necklace and 1 400 children have been tracked to date By the end of 2016 as many as 5 000 children could be wearing the device Credit Bradley Clift Yale Khushi Baby necklace keeps track of immunizations Yale University Posted by Yale on January 5 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A necklace that contains a computer chip is keeping track of immunization records of young children in India When linked to a mobile application health care workers seeing patients in remote villages in India can access real time data to help ensure that children get and stay up to date on all of their necessary vaccinations The college students who developed the device have launched a company called Khushi Baby khushi means happy in Hindi The students traveled to India last year to flesh out their idea for a wearable immunization record They got the input of nearly 100 mothers of small children as well as local health care workers Scan baby s fingerprints to track immunizations Kids are already wearing these types of necklaces for cultural reasons so it made sense says co founder Ruchit Nagar a masters of public health student in the epidemiology of microbial diseases department at Yale University But we wouldn t have known that had we not talked to the community The students see their necklace which can also be worn as a bracelet or anklet as a way to educate and engage local communities on vaccination and encourage them to visit established vaccination camps for health services The big challenge is that vaccination is a preventative measure and you don t see the immediate effects of getting stabbed with a needle All you see is your child crying says Nagar Building a level of awareness and trust is so important A research study is currently underway to determine how well the necklace works to increase immunization rates which is estimated to vary widely but average between 50 percent to 60 percent in India s

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/immunizations-india-khushi-baby-1084412-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Fewer early births after group prenatal care - Futurity
    University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles 3D X rays show how skull fuses early in Apert syndrome Environment may entice breast cancer to spread Why you can t treat breast cancer as one disease Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Group prenatal visits build in additional time for education skill building and the opportunity to discuss and learn from the experience of peers as well as more face to face time with caregivers say the researchers Credit leafhopper77 Flickr Fewer early births after group prenatal care Yale University right Original Study Posted by Michael Greenwood Yale on December 28 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Getting prenatal care in a group rather than individually can improve health outcomes for both young mothers and their babies a new study finds Women who received group prenatal care were 33 percent less likely to have infants who were small for gestational age In addition group care recipients had reduced risk for preterm delivery and low birthweight Babies born to these women also spent fewer days in the neonatal intensive care unit In addition mothers with more group prenatal care visits were less likely to become pregnant again quickly after giving birth an important outcome known as birth spacing that reduces the risk of having another baby at risk for preterm delivery Few clinical interventions have had an impact on birth outcomes says Jeannette R Ickovics the study s lead author and professor in the Yale School of Public Health Group prenatal care is related to improved health outcomes for mothers and babies without adding risk If scaled nationally group prenatal care could lead to significant improvements in birth outcomes health disparities and healthcare costs she adds Does fracking increase risk of preterm birth As reported in the American Journal of Public Health the team conducted a randomized controlled trial in 14 health centers in New York City and compared the birth outcomes of women who received CenteringPregnancy Plus group prenatal care to those who received traditional individual care The more than 1 000 women in the study were placed in groups of 8 to 12 women at the same gestational point in their pregnancy and were cared for by a clinician and a medical assistant The study found that the higher the number of group visits attended the lower the rates of

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/group-prenatal-care-1079262-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • To stop mass extinction, focus on the 'ghosts' - Futurity
    of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Computer models shake up plate tectonics Spider venom mix up could make insecticides safer Picking up the pace of crop development Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Species rarity itself rather than extinction can lead to a cascade of changes within ecosystems long before the species goes extinct the scientists explain Credit axolotl via Shutterstock To stop mass extinction focus on the ghosts Yale University right Original Study Posted by Jim Shelton Yale on December 21 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A new study urges scientists to move their focus from species extinction to species rarity in order to recognize and avoid a mass extinction in the modern world Pincelli Hull of Yale University and colleagues argue in Nature that modern extinction rates may be a poor measure of whether we re in the midst of a mass extinction event today something many scientists suspect may be happening The ecological ghosts of oceans past already swim in emptied seas Instead Hull and her coauthors contend the best way to see a mass extinction in real time is by studying changes in species and ecosystems Earth has experienced more than a dozen mass extinction events when the great diversity of life on Earth disappeared and was replaced by a flora or fauna often entirely unlike what had come before The largest of these events the most recent which wiped out the dinosaurs was 66 million years ago have collectively become known as the Five Mass Extinctions In recent years Hull says some have argued that Earth is entering a sixth mass extinction event Tiny engineers caused first mass extinction I am an extinction scientist In my research I dissect past extinctions to work out what occurred and why The idea of being able to pin down whether we are in a sixth mass extinction based on extinction rates measured today was absolutely astounding to me says Hull who is lead author of the study and an assistant professor of geology and geophysics It implied a deep mechanistic and predictive understanding of how mass extinctions unfold that I wasn t sure we actually had Hull and her coauthors Simon Darroch and Douglas Erwin from the Smithsonian Institution contend that long before species become extinct their rarity may cause far reaching changes in global ecosystems In fact the researchers explain the rarity of previously abundant species and ecosystems

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/mass-extinction-rarity-1074982-2/ (2016-02-11)
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