archive-org.com » ORG » F » FUTURITY.ORG

Total: 1123

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Could bedside manner cut extra CT scans? - Futurity
    Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Breaking cycle of family depression Low vitamin D linked to aggressive prostate cancer An online test for Alzheimer s by 2015 Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print When a doctor takes time to listen and care for a patient and the patient sees the doctor cares the patient is more willing to trust the doctor s recommendation whether CT scan is indicated says Edward R Melnick Credit ct scan via Shutterstock Could bedside manner cut extra CT scans Yale University right Original Study Posted by Ziba Kashef Yale on November 20 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Strengthening the doctor patient relationship can help reduce unwarranted CT scans and their growing cost researchers report One in every three CT scans performed on patients with minor head injury is not medically necessary The American College of Emergency Physicians has identified CT overuse top priority for minimizing wasteful and unnecessary tests in the emergency department Emergency providers have guidelines such as the Canadian CT Head Rule to help determine when a patient s minor head injury should lead to a CT scan and further intervention Although the guidelines have been tested and validated they are often ignored For example CT scans may be performed on patients with signs of concussion even though CT does not help diagnose concussion but rather other risks such as bleeding To understand the disconnect between CT guidelines and practice for minor head injury Edward R Melnick assistant professor of emergency medicine at Yale University and his coauthors conducted a qualitative study that included focus groups and interviews with patients and providers as well as clinical observations How do doctors decide when kids need CT scans The team found that a range of

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/ct-scans-doctors-1054252-2/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Galaxy with a heartbeat gets its pulse taken - Futurity
    State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles RNA snippets direct worker bee tasks Free software classifies leaf veins Two armed nanorobot captures DNA molecules Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Cardiac arrest is not expected until a trillion years from now says Pieter van Dokkum That s a hundred times longer than the age of the universe Credit Patty Flickr Galaxy with a heartbeat gets its pulse taken Yale University right Original Study Posted by Jim Shelton Yale on November 20 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Astronomers have found a galaxy with a heartbeat and they ve taken its pulse They are the first to measure the effect that pulsating older red stars have on the light of their surrounding galaxy We tend to think of galaxies as steady beacons in the sky but they are actually shimmering due to all the giant pulsating stars in them says Pieter van Dokkum an astronomy professor at Yale University and coauthor of the study in Nature Later in life stars like our Sun undergo significant changes They become very bright and swell up to an enormous size swallowing any planets within a radius roughly equivalent to Earth s distance from the Sun Near the end of their lifetime they begin to pulsate increasing and decreasing their brightness every few hundred days In our Milky Way galaxy many stars are known to be in this phase The Milky Way is full of wandering stars Until now no one had considered the effects of these stars on the light coming from more distant galaxies In distant galaxies the light of each pulsating star is mixed with the light of many more stars that do not vary in brightness We realized that these stars are so bright and their pulsations so strong that they are difficult to hide says Charlie Conroy an assistant professor at Harvard University

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/galaxy-heartbeat-1053732-2/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Habitat shape matters in fight against extinction - Futurity
    University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Invasive beetles lure mates with pheromone trail Different microbes evolve in Earth s polar oceans How mutant plants could clean up explosives Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print We demonstrate that the knowledge of total area of habitat loss is not sufficient for a proper prediction of biodiversity loss it is crucial to know exactly where that habitat is lost says David Storch Credit Travis Nep Smith Flickr Habitat shape matters in fight against extinction Yale University right Original Study Posted by Jim Shelton Yale on November 18 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The shape of a lost habitat goes a long way toward predicting the future of species extinction and biodiversity according to a new study Area loss is obviously a critical factor for biodiversity within an ecosystem researchers say but so is the geometry of that lost habitat In fact that geometry may separate the species that see swift change from those that experience slower change they say These species may differ in other attributes too The relationship between the size of an area and its species richness has been considered one of the few law like ecological relationships and has been used by conservationists to gauge potential extinctions as habitable area is lost Our study shows that any such applications require a much more nuanced approach says Walter Jetz an associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University and director of the Yale Program in Spatial Biodiversity Science and Conservation As we show the specific way suitable areas are lost is absolutely critical for predicting species losses and moreover the impact varies with species functional and evolutionary role says Jetz coauthor of the new study in Nature Communications To save Brazil s forests focus on big landowners The researchers looked at extensive data for birds mammals

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/habitat-geometry-extinction-1051692-2/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 'Tinkertoy' framework most porous yet - Futurity
    University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Robot sparrow starts a flap with rivals Plant enzyme works day and night shifts Why animal evolution mirrors wheel design Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Tinkertoy framework most porous yet University of Pittsburgh right Original Study Posted by Anita Srikameswaran Pittsburgh on January 4 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U PITTSBURGH US An alternate approach to building porous materials could ease the delivery of drugs into the human body and better control the storage of voluminous quantities of gas molecules new research shows Working with metal organic frameworks crystalline compounds made from metal cluster vertices linked together by organic molecules to form one two or three dimensional porous structures researchers addressed changing the size of the vertex the metal cluster rather than the length of the organic molecule links which resulted in the largest metal organic framework pore volume

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/tinkertoy-framework-most-porous-yet/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • After crash, black holes 'ring' like bells - Futurity
    of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Team finds new microbe inside termite gut How to take control of an unruly system like your brain Search for life Why we need a deep space telescope Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print After crash black holes ring like bells Cardiff University Posted by Chris Jones Cardiff on September 17 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license CARDIFF U US The dying tones of black holes could reveal the cosmic crash that produced them say researchers who discovered this new property Black holes are regions of space where gravity is so strong that not even light can escape and so isolated black holes are truly dark objects and don t emit any form of radiation However black holes that get deformed because of other black holes or stars crashing into them are known to emit a new sort of radiation called gravitational waves which Einstein predicted nearly a hundred years ago Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime that travel at the speed of light but they are extremely difficult to detect Kilometer sized laser interferometers are being built in the US Europe Japan and India to detect these waves from colliding black holes and other cosmic events They are sensitive to gravitational waves in roughly the same frequency range as audible sound waves and can be thought of as a microphone to gravitational waves Two black holes orbiting around each other emit gravitational waves and lose energy eventually they come together and collide to produce a black hole that is initially highly deformed Gravitational waves from a deformed black hole come out not in one tone but in a mixture of a number of different tones very much like the dying tones of a ringing bell In the case of black holes the frequency of each tone and rate at which the tones decay depend only on the two parameters that characterize a black hole its mass and how rapidly it spins Therefore scientists have long believed that by detecting the spacetime ripples of a black hole and measuring their frequencies one can measure the mass and spin of a black hole without going anywhere near it Ioannis Kamaretsos Mark Hannam and B Sathyaprakash of Cardiff University used Cardiff s powerful ARCCA cluster to perform a large number of computer simulations of a pair of black holes crashing against each other and found that the different tones of a ringing black hole can actually tell us much more The team s findings will appear in

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/after-crash-black-holes-ring-like-bells/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Each vineyard has a unique microbiome - Futurity
    University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Smoke from fires fueled 2011 tornado outbreak Velcro mittens teach babies to pay attention later Brain maps give reach direction Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Credit Maja Petric Unsplash Each vineyard has a unique microbiome University of Chicago right Original Study Posted by Louise Lerner Chicago on April 30 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license While a few known strains of bacteria can destroy plants it s likely that hundreds to thousands of other species actually help them living in a complex interwoven community that when working at its best can help the plant survive tough times A new study documents the microbes that live among grapevines and considers their influence on the plants health The study is part of a larger push to understand the roles microbes play in agriculture A team led by Associate Professor Jack Gilbert a microbial ecologist at Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago wanted to explore these communities 5 vineyards over 2 years Gilbert s team led research that may help farmers encourage healthier plants without pesticides They sampled microbes in the soil roots leaves flowers and grapes from the plants in five New York vineyards over every season in the span of two years One of our key findings was that the vast majority of the bacteria come from the soil says Argonne researcher Sarah Owens The leaves roots flowers and grapes all had the same bacteria but in different abundances which may suggest that different parts of the vine are recruiting different species For example plants can encourage certain microbes to grow by producing chemicals or nutrients that those microbes like she says However each vineyard had its own unique microbial signature Owens says even when the vineyards were just half a mile down the road from one another They also tracked differences associated with the soil s pH and its proportions of carbon and nitrogen The type and content of soil the climate the plant varieties and how the vineyard is managed these are all expressed in the microbiome and we have to understand them if we want to translate this knowledge into practical applications Owens says Selecting bacteria The next step Gilbert says would be to see if we can find microbes that would help farmers specifically

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/grapevine-grapes-microbiome-911332/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Kathy Svitil-Caltech, Author at Futurity
    University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Kathy Svitil Caltech California Institute of Technology Cornell University Georgia Institute of Technology Penn State University of Florida Team detects ripples in spacetime just as Einstein predicted Scientists have detected gravitational waves from two black holes merging 1 3 billion years ago just as Einstein predicted in 1915 READ MORE California Institute of Technology Nano device measures molecule shape A new tool reveals the shape of molecules The new technique uncovers a previously unrealized capability of mechanical sensors says Mehmet Selim Hanay READ MORE California Institute of Technology Why giant white spots pop up on Saturn Just what triggers giant storms on Saturn and why they occur so infrequently has been unclear Now two planetary scientists say they may have the answers READ MORE California Institute of Technology Mars rover uncovers a surprisingly Earth like rock Analysis of a rock on Mars by the rover Curiosity suggests parts of the red planet may be more like Read More California Institute of Technology Reactor converts sunlight into fuel CALTECH US A common metal found in self cleaning ovens is the key component of a reactor that uses concentrated Read More California Institute of Technology Nanomesh slows down heat travel CALTECH US A new type of mesh material made out of silicon the second most abundant element in Earth s crust could Read More California Institute of Technology RNA therapy turns cancer cells suicidal CALTECH US Researchers have engineered a fundamentally new approach to killing cancer cells California Institute of Technology Dead simple way to see atomic structure CALTECH US Using a sheet of carbon just one atom thick researchers have devised a new technique to visualize the structure Read More California Institute of Technology University of Texas at Austin Computer models shake up plate tectonics CALTECH U TEXAS AUSTIN US New computer algorithms allow for the first time simultaneous modeling of the earth s mantle flow large scale Read More California Institute of Technology University of California Berkeley University of Florida

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/caltech-svitil/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Nature selects for shorter, stouter women - Futurity
    McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Birds knew to flee before tornado hit Dad genes show red fox s path to North America Renewable cellulose crystals are as stiff as steel Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Nature selects for shorter stouter women University of Pennsylvania Yale University Posted by Bill Hathaway Yale on October 30 2009 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license YALE US Researchers have detected the effects of natural selection among two generations of contemporary women and predict their descendants will be slightly shorter and chubbier have lower cholesterol and blood pressure and have their first children earlier in life The predictions which were made in the Oct 19 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences were based on an analysis of women who have participated in the famous Framingham Heart Study that began in 1948 The results illustrate the medical value of evolutionary biology principles 150 years after Darwin published the Origin of the Species the authors say The idea that natural selection has stopped operating in humans because we have gotten better at keeping people alive is just plain wrong says Stephen Stearns senior author of the paper and Edward P Bass Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University The reason is that traits that enable women to have children will continue to be subject to selection As a first step the Yale researchers measured the individual reproductive success of two generations of more than 2 000 women who participated in the Framingham study and had reached menopause They then surveyed the traits that conferred reproductive success After adjusting for environmental factors such as income education and lifestyle choices such as smoking the researchers estimated the heritability of traits by applying correlations among all relatives They also adjusted for the indirect effects of selection by measuring the impacts the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/nature-selects-for-shorter-stouter-women/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •