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  • elections Archives - Futurity
    Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Topic elections University of Washington In Iowa caucuses expectations trump votes The front runners will need to watch their backs in the Iowa caucuses where expectations might just be more important than votes READ MORE Vanderbilt University Bad feelings not ideas divide the U S Congress Dislike not ideology keeps the US Congress from working says Marc Hetherington When you don t like the other side you don t even talk to them READ MORE Boston University Jefferson s religion wouldn t fly with today s voters Thomas Jefferson wouldn t get elected today says historian Bruce J Schulman whose new book traces religion s changing role in US politics READ MORE Vanderbilt University Hidden bias says women don t look like leaders A new study finds that voters hold subconscious bias against women as leaders even among those who say they d like to support female candidates READ MORE University

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/topic/elections/ (2016-02-11)
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  • El Niño can be a blessing or curse for Midwest crops - Futurity
    at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Antarctic glacier is rapidly melting from the bottom up Caves get bigger when microbes eat this Polar bears ice not so thin after all Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Farmers might not have a clear idea of how this year s strong weather pattern will affect them until spring Credit Michael Leland Flickr El Niño can be a blessing or curse for Midwest crops Iowa State University Posted by Fred Love Iowa State on January 12 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Midwestern farmers usually fare well during years that El Niño weather patterns affect the growing season But experts say that can change if El Niño is followed immediately by its antithesis a cooling of waters in the Pacific Ocean known as La Niña El Niño the name given to a band of warm water that tends to develop in the central Pacific Ocean emerged at the end of 2015 to become one of the strongest examples of the phenomenon on record fueling storms that have rippled across Southern California and Arizona History

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/el-nino-midwest-crops-1089442/ (2016-02-11)
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  • El Nino Archives - Futurity
    London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Topic El Nino Iowa State University El Niño can be a blessing or curse for Midwest crops Midwestern farmers usually fare well during El Niño years with above trend crop yields But that can all change if La Niña weather follows closely behind READ MORE Texas A M University Fewer hurricanes in Atlantic thanks to El Niño An El Niño in the Pacific Ocean almost always hampers hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean sometimes by as much as 50 percent READ MORE University of Florida University of Pittsburgh El Niño heat sets off waves of dengue fever Dengue epidemics across southeast Asia appear to be linked to the abnormally high temperatures brought by the El Niño weather phenomenon READ MORE University of California Davis Can salmon survive changes at the Equator What happens at the Equator doesn t stay at the Equator El Niño linked changes in the ocean may be putting two Northern Pacific salmon species at risk READ MORE University of Washington Boston can blame Pacific s warm blob for record

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/topic/el-nino/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Smart 'sweatband' can tell if you're dehydrated - Futurity
    Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Heartburn drugs in hospital raise death risk Why Thanksgiving should be national cheat day Receptor key to food poisoning defense Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print To test the wearable device researchers put dozens of volunteers through various indoor and outdoor exercises Study subjects cycled on stationary bikes or ran outdoors on tracks and trails from a few minutes to more than an hour Credit iStockphoto Smart sweatband can tell if you re dehydrated University of California Berkeley right Original Study Posted by Sarah Yang Berkeley on January 28 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have designed a new wearable monitor that keeps track of your health by measuring chemicals in your sweat While health monitors have exploded onto the consumer electronics scene over the past decade researchers say this device which can be synched in real time to your smart phone is the first fully integrated electronic system that can provide continuous noninvasive monitoring of multiple biochemicals in perspiration The advance opens doors to wearable devices that alert users to health problems such as fatigue dehydration and dangerously high body temperatures Human sweat contains physiologically rich information thus making it an attractive body fluid for noninvasive wearable sensors says study principal investigator Ali Javey professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California at Berkeley and principal invesdtigator of the study that is published in the journal Nature However sweat is complex and it is necessary to measure multiple targets to extract meaningful information about your state of health This fitness tracker knows if you re faking In this regard we have developed a fully integrated system that simultaneously and selectively measures multiple sweat analytes and wirelessly transmits the processed data to a smartphone Our work presents a technology platform for sweat based health monitors Having a wearable sweat sensor is really incredible because the metabolites and electrolytes measured by the Javey device are vitally important for the health and well being of an individual says coauthor George Brooks Berkeley professor of integrative biology When studying the effects of exercise on human physiology we typically take blood samples With this noninvasive technology someday it may be possible to know what s going on physiologically without needle sticks or attaching little disposable cups on you Headbands and wristbands The prototype packs five sensors onto a flexible circuit board The sensors measure the metabolites glucose and lactate the electrolytes sodium and potassium and skin temperature The integrated system allows us to use the measured skin temperature to calibrate and

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/sweat-wearable-health-monitor-1096912/ (2016-02-11)
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  • gadgets Archives - Futurity
    Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Topic gadgets University of California Berkeley Smart sweatband can tell if you re dehydrated A new wearable monitor that keeps track of your health by measuring chemicals in your sweat can be synched in real time to your smartphone READ MORE Northwestern University This fitness tracker knows if you re faking Forget lounging on the couch and shaking your activity tracker so it thinks you ve broken a sweat It won t work with this slacker proof device READ MORE Duke University Do tracking gadgets turn fun into work Using gadgets to track how much we eat sleep and exercise could have an unseen cost enjoyment READ MORE Stanford University Engineers are building a real Star Trek tricorder In about 10 years the tricorder technology used in Star Trek could become reality Engineers say it might detect stuff like buried explosives and tumors READ MORE Brown University

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/topic/gadgets/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Americans think Hamilton and a guy named Thomas Moore were presidents - Futurity
    was the first Secretary of the Treasury The survey was designed to gauge how well Americans can recognize the names of past presidents as opposed to the much greater challenge of directly recalling them from memory and listing their names on a blank sheet of paper I had predicted that Benjamin Franklin would be the person most falsely recognized as a president but Hamilton beat him by a mile says Henry L Roediger III a professor and human memory expert at Washington University in St Louis who led the study The interesting thing is that their confidence in Hamilton having been president is fairly high higher than for six or so actual presidents What do Americans know Roediger has been testing the ability of undergraduate college students to remember the names of presidents since 1973 when he first administered the test to undergraduates while a psychology graduate student at Yale University Roediger s 2014 study in the journal Science suggests that we as a nation do fairly well at naming the first few and the last few presidents in the order they served But our recall abilities then fall off quickly with fewer than 20 percent able to remember more than the last eight or nine presidents in order The focus of the current study is a bit different Our studies over the past 40 years show that Americans can recall about half the US presidents but the question we explore with this study is whether people know the presidents but are simply unable to access them for recall Roediger says 4 presidential elections that changed U S politics The current study is based on a name recognition test administered to 326 people via Mechanical Turk an interactive online service operated by Amazon Participants were asked to identify past presidents when presented with a list of names that included actual presidents and non presidents such as Hamilton and Franklin The lists also presented other false items including familiar names from American history and non famous common names such as Thomas Moore With each president or non president response participants indicated their level of certainty on a scale of zero to 100 where 100 was absolutely certain The rate for correctly recognizing the names of past presidents was 88 percent well above recall but far from perfect Franklin Pierce and Chester Arthur were recognized less than 60 percent of the time Hamilton was more frequently identified as president than several actual presidents and people were very confident when saying he was president 83 on the 100 point scale Who is Thomas Moore The study identified three other prominent figures from American history that more than a quarter of those surveyed incorrectly recognize as past presidents including Franklin Hubert Humphrey and John Calhoun Perhaps more striking nearly a third of those surveyed falsely recognized the common name Thomas Moore as someone who was once an American president Humphrey served as vice president and ran for president in 1968 Franklin was a famous

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/memory-us-president-1103322-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • memory Archives - Futurity
    University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Topic memory Washington University in St Louis Americans think Hamilton and a guy named Thomas Moore were presidents About 71 percent of Americans are very sure that Alexander Hamilton was a US president a recent survey shows Hamilton beat Ben Franklin by a mile READ MORE University of Texas at Austin How the brain plays back memories in fast forward Specific brain waves let us play back memories or envision future activities in fast forward It s similar to how computers compress a file READ MORE ETH Zurich Do our aging cells get smarter not sicker As we age proteins accumulate in our cells and scientists suspect this makes us sick A study of yeast cells however suggests something quite different READ MORE Cornell University University of Texas at Austin Why some prairie voles are cheaters Prairie voles are one of the few monogamous mammals in the world But a combination of genes and bad spatial memory can cause some males to roam READ MORE Cornell University Some

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/topic/memory/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 5 big questions about the science of 'Star Wars' - Futurity
    a planet passing in front of its star blocking a small fraction of its light In its four year run Kepler detected and confirmed nearly 2 000 planetary systems ranging from Hot Jupiters to frozen rocky worlds Intriguingly a select few lie within the Goldilocks zone where liquid water could exist because the planet isn t too hot or too cold This planetary diversity is also seen in Star Wars Endor the home of the Ewoks that orbits a gaseous giant planet Hoth where Luke Skywalker almost froze to death Alderaan a blue green orb not unlike our Earth until it was destroyed by the Death Star and Tatooine Luke and Anakin Skywalker s home planet One of the most vivid scenes of Episode IV happens when Luke gazes toward the horizon at a binary sunset When the original was released in 1977 such a scene was restricted to the sci fi realm but this is no longer the case Kepler has now discovered 10 planets that orbit binary star systems whose possible inhabitants see a similar sight every day The Kepler Mission was just the first step in humankind s discovery of planetary systems in the Milky Way It only observed 1 400th of the sky It could only detect planets out to 3 000 light years which is tiny compared to the Milky Way s size of 100 000 light years Using Kepler s detections astronomers have estimated that there could be as many as 40 billion planets in our galaxy But that is only one galaxy Imagine how many planets are littered among the 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe Perhaps planets from a long time ago in a galaxy far far away Credit Michael Li Flickr 3 Are C 3PO and R2 D2 coming soon Even though C 3PO and R2 D2 lived in a galaxy a long time ago today s roboticists still haven t found a way to create their current day cousins The College of Computing s Sonia Chernova is one of many on campus trying to bring robots out of the lab and into the world so that people can have their own droids She says Robots tend to be on one extreme or the other these days One kind is found on Mars battlefields and in operating rooms These robots are extensions of humans they re rarely autonomous because a human is always in the loop As for R2 D2 and his friends we re not that far from personal robots Others are autonomous We see this mostly on manufacturing floors where machines are programmed to do the same repetitive task with extreme precision Not only are they limited by what they can do but they re also often separated from people for safety reasons I m focused on something in the middle Full autonomy for personal robots would be great but it s not yet practical given today s technology Humans are too unpredictable and environments are ever changing

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/star-wars-science-physics-1081252-2/ (2016-02-11)
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