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  • Low-voltage 'troll' zaps salt out of seawater - Futurity
    Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Planets like Earth could be hiding in space dust Web app is like Google maps for the brain Why tablets can t replace real world in schools Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Low voltage troll zaps salt out of seawater University of Texas at Austin right Original Study Posted by Daniel Oppenheimer U Texas on June 28 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Chemists are hopeful their new energy efficient method to desalinate water can be scaled up for personal or even municipal uses The method which creates a small electrical field that removes salts from seawater consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques The technique described in the journal Angewandte Chemie requires so little energy that it can run on a store bought battery The process called electrochemically mediated seawater desalination evades the problems confronting current desalination methods by eliminating the need for a membrane and by separating salt from water at a microscale The availability of water for drinking and crop irrigation is one of the most basic requirements for maintaining and improving human health says Richard Crooks a chemistry professor at the University of Texas at Austin Seawater desalination is one way to address this need but most current methods for desalinating water rely on expensive and easily contaminated membranes The membrane free method we ve developed still needs to be refined and scaled up but if we can succeed at that then one day it might be possible to provide fresh water on a massive scale using a simple even portable system This new method holds particular promise for the water stressed areas in which about a third of the planet s inhabitants live Many of these regions have access to abundant seawater but not to the energy infrastructure or money necessary to desalt water using conventional technology As a result millions of deaths per year in these regions are attributed to water related causes Troll diverts fresh water To achieve desalination the researchers apply a small voltage 3 0 volts to a plastic chip filled with seawater The chip contains a microchannel with two branches At the junction of the channel an embedded electrode neutralizes some of the chloride ions in seawater to create an

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/low-voltage-troll-zaps-salt-out-of-seawater/ (2016-02-11)
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  • How a technical concept 'travels' the brain - Futurity
    Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Mold reshape and move gel with light Wrinkly coating can shimmy off bacteria To make boron sheets focus on the holes Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print This provides evidence that appropriate instruction can bring out the fundamental understanding of how things work at a deep level says Robert Mason Credit Javier Vázquez Flickr How a technical concept travels the brain Carnegie Mellon University right Original Study Posted by Shilo Rea Carnegie Mellon on March 23 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have traced what happens in the brain as someone learns a technical concept Published in NeuroImage the findings reveal how new technical knowledge is built up in the brain during the course of different learning stages This study yields an initial brain grounded theory of learning of mechanical systems that can be related to the instructional methods and resulting cognitive processes that underlie science learning says Marcel Just professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University It will be possible to assess whether some instructional sequences lead to better or more expert like brain outcomes than other sequences This will enable instructors to teach to the brain instead of teaching to the test he says How things work Just and colleague Robert Mason the lead author of the study scanned the brains of 16 healthy adults as they learned for the first time how four common mechanical systems work While inside the brain scanner the participants were shown a series of pictures diagrams and text that described the internal workings of a bathroom scale fire extinguisher automobile braking system and trumpet The explanation sequence allowed the researchers to examine the participants brain states after each learning step For example the bathroom scale was presented with a schematic diagram and description A bathroom scale consists of a lever a spring a ratchet and a dial Then the operation of the scale was described in a set of causal explanations such as The person s weight exerts a downward force on a lever The lever pulls a spring downward in proportion to the weight An explanation sentence highlighted relevant parts of the schematic design Tracking the concept Just and Mason were able to use the fMRI images to follow how each new concept made its way from the words and pictures to neural representations over many regions of the brain Interestingly

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/technical-concept-learning-brain-880912/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Peter Rüegg-ETH Zurich, Author at Futurity
    University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Peter Rüegg ETH Zurich ETH Zurich Cells of microbes found in mantle rock from Lost City In an interview Gretchen Bernasconi Green discusses the discovery of cells in mantle rock and the possibility rocks on other planets could host life READ MORE ETH Zurich This is the world s smallest optical switch Six months ago researchers introduced what seemed like the smallest possible optical switch but now a team has built one that operates on the atomic scale READ MORE ETH Zurich Water filter removes toxic metals with charcoal and whey A new water filter made of two low cost materials can remove toxic heavy metal ions and radioactive substances in just one pass READ MORE ETH Zurich Hagfish slime clouds have scientists stumped Hagfish secrete a slime mass that is very unusual It s almost 100 water and super stretchy Scientists say they re struggling to recreate it in the lab READ MORE ETH Zurich This is the tiniest color picture ever printed Scientists have set a Guinness World Record for the smallest inkjet printed color image It s as tiny as the cross sectional area of a human hair READ MORE ETH Zurich Cheap polarizer detects HIV and Ebola in minutes A new device uses polarized light and a smartphone to quickly diagnose a host of diseases including malaria HIV and Ebola READ MORE ETH Zurich 30 genes out of 40 000 extend lifespan After combing through 40 000 genes scientists have identified 30 that have a clear effect on aging and longevity The genes are all found in humans READ MORE ETH Zurich Was Earth like Venus before plate tectonics Scientists are studying huge crater like circles on Venus to figure out what triggered plate tectonics on Earth READ MORE ETH Zurich A pill a day might not cure iron deficiency Maybe daily iron pills aren t the best way to treat anemia When iron enters the body the liver makes a molecule that blocks it for more than 24 hours

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/eth-zurich-ruegg/ (2016-02-11)
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