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  • New antibody adds to arsenal against Dengue - Futurity
    Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Memories in the cells of your mind Grow myelin with cells sourced from skin Light therapy changes the way mice feel pain Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The team is now working on identifying an antibody effective against DENV 4 to complete the full set of antibodies and to use it to make an effective cocktail against all serotypes Credit spraying to prevent spread of dengue via Shutterstock New antibody adds to arsenal against Dengue Duke University National University of Singapore right Original Study Posted by Dharshini Subbiah NUS on July 7 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have found a key piece of the puzzle needed to potentially cure or treat dengue The virus infects about 400 million people worldwide annually and no licensed vaccine is currently available The research shows how an antibody neutralizes dengue virus serotype 2 DENV 2 Published online in Science the discovery could help with the development of dengue therapeutics Dengue virus has four serotypes DENV1 4 circulating in nature which makes it difficult to treat To have complete protection against the dengue infection a vaccine has to simultaneously stimulate an equally strong antibody response against all four serotypes This so far has been proven difficult as vaccines provide differing levels of protection against the serotypes Latest clinical trials show good protection against DENV 3 and DEN 4 but poor protection against DENV 1 and no protection at all against DENV 2 The team led by Duke NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore researchers Shee Mei Lok and Gunter Fibriansah demonstrated how a potent human derived antibody 2D22 can kill DENV 2 In past research Lok has shown that the DENV 2 is more complex than the rest of the dengue serotypes as the mosquito derived virus has a highly dynamic structure which changes its form or morphology as it infects humans This makes DENV 2 harder to kill While previously identified antibodies could only kill DENV 2 of a

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/dengue-virus-serotype-954822/ (2016-02-11)
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  • How 34,000 tiny holes could stop counterfeit - Futurity
    University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Transistors made of the world s thinnest silicon Team sequences cucumber genome Create retinas from Jell O Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The new ultra capacity nano photon sieve can incorporate more than 34 000 nanoholes randomly distributed in its surface Credit Bastian Eichhorn Flickr How 34 000 tiny holes could stop counterfeit National University of Singapore right Original Study Posted by National University of Singapore on July 6 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have found a way to potentially prevent counterfeit in currency documents credit cards and even IDs Many modern documents include holograms to enhance the security and they are generally difficult to replicate outside of an optical lab Although accurate recreation of these holograms is extremely challenging a similar shiny multi colored look can

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/counterfeit-nano-holes-953742/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 'Living fossil' spiders hitched a ride to get to Asia - Futurity
    State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles To read words brain detects motion A cheaper way to make hydrogen fuel TB tests misfire in cattle with parasites Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Primitive spiders known as liphistiids started diversifying between four and 24 million years ago about the same time the subcontinent of India collided with Eurasia Because the burrow dwelling spiders couldn t travel over water they must have traveled with the land masses Credit Xu Xin Living fossil spiders hitched a ride to get to Asia National University of Singapore right Original Study Posted by National University of Singapore on June 30 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The geographical distribution of the most primitive spiders that exist today may provide new insights into the movement of Earth s land masses millions of years ago The group of spiders named liphistiids regarded as living fossils because they closely resemble their extinct ancestors with segmented abdomen and spinnerets located in the middle of the lower abdomen currently inhabit East Asia and Southeast Asia However the only fossil of their ancient relatives dating back some 295 million years was discovered in France Researchers say the cross continental migrating arachnids could shed light on continental drift when at its beginning Earth was a supercontinent that broke up and shifted apart 89 species Scientists examined about 2 000 liphistiid specimens in Asia With a molecular clock method using DNA analysis they were able to determine when the extant spiders originated and diversified The findings published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B show for the first time that the original liphistiid branched out from their ancestors about 39 to 58 million years ago says Li Daiqin associate professor of biological sciences at the National University of Singapore This new group started diversifying to eight genera between four and 24 million years ago giving

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/fossils-spiders-continental-drift-950952/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Termites likely evolved from cockroaches - Futurity
    University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Robots built to take photos of tricky ocean floor Fish parents know who s a threat to the family Move to Asia split dogs from wolves Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The results suggest termites are 35 million years older than the oldest known fossils Credit Gregory Han Flickr Termites likely evolved from cockroaches National University of Singapore right Original Study Posted by National University of Singapore on June 16 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have discovered termites evolved from cockroaches 170 million years ago probably in Africa or Asia Termites evolved from cockroaches by acquiring the ability to digest cellulose the main compound in plant cell walls and wood and the most abundant organic molecule on Earth This ability helped

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/termites-cockroaches-942352/ (2016-02-11)
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  • NYC sells more lottery tickets when sports teams win - Futurity
    Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Strong loonie sends Canadian shoppers across the border Are good video games like novels and films Could growing more food justify land grabs Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print On a day in which multiple sports teams unexpectedly win approximately 160 000 more is spent on lottery gambling in New York City relative to an average day researchers say Credit Flood G Flickr NYC sells more lottery tickets when sports teams win New York University right Original Study Posted by James Devitt NYU on January 22 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Unexpectedly positive events like surprising sports wins or unusually sunny days may make people more willing to gamble according to an analysis of two years worth of daily lottery purchases in New York City Our study reveals how positive but incidental unexpected outcomes like sports and weather can predict day to day lottery gambling in New York City s 8 million residents says Ross Otto of New York University Previous laboratory research has shown that people who are in a good mood are willing to take riskier bets and that unexpected positive outcomes are particularly likely to boost people s mood But there was little research establishing a link between unexpected positive outcomes and actual risk taking behavior in the real world so researchers decided to investigate this link by looking at a massive urban dataset lottery gambling in New York City Data came from daily purchases of non jackpot based lottery games in New York City over the entire years of 2011 and 2012 from the New York State Gaming Commission A single brain connection predicts risky gambling To examine sports outcomes the researchers first tabulated all wins and losses in regular and postseason games played by New York City area teams in 2011 and 2012 including teams in the National Football League National Basketball League National Hockey League and Major League Baseball Using these data the researchers calculated a daily expectation of each team s win probability which served as the prediction for the next day s sports outcomes On each day that a team played the difference between the predicted outcome and the true outcome provided a measure of how unexpectedly good or bad the actual sports outcome was The researchers also used satellite derived solar irradiance data to measure the amount of sunshine for each day in 2011 and 2012 in

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/gambling-lottery-risk-1094292-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • We slow down after mistakes, but still mess up - Futurity
    of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Countdown to Curiosity s 7 minutes of terror Physicist grows twin snowflakes in 16 minutes 3 600 crystals in wearable skin monitor health 24 7 Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The deliberative approach we take to avoid repeating a mistake neither enhances nor diminishes the likelihood we ll repeat it says Roozbeh Kiani Credit bark Flickr We slow down after mistakes but still mess up New York University right Original Study Posted by James Devitt NYU on January 21 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license It s no secret that people slow down mentally after making a mistake Monkeys do too Neuroscientists call it post error slowing or PES What s not clear are the neurological processes that drive PES A new study that addresses a long standing debate on the value of PES could offer insights into conditions that impair judgments such as Alzheimer s disease and ADHD researchers say Our research reveals that a combination of changes in the brain slow us down after mistakes explains Braden Purcell a postdoctoral fellow at New York University and a coauthor of the study in the journal Neuron One gathers more information for the decision to prevent repeating the same mistake again A second change reduces the quality of evidence we obtain which decreases the likelihood we will make an accurate choice In the end these two processes cancel each other out meaning that the deliberative approach we take to avoid repeating a mistake neither enhances nor diminishes the likelihood we ll repeat it adds Roozbeh Kiani an assistant professor in NYU s Center for Neural Science and the study s other coauthor Humans vs monkeys The researchers took a closer look at the process through a series of experiments involving monkeys and humans Both watched a field of noisy moving dots on a computer screen and reported their decision about the net direction of motion with their gaze The experimenters controlled the difficulty of each decision with the proportion of dots that moved together in a single direction for instance a large proportion of dots moving to the right provided very strong evidence for a rightward choice but a small proportion provided only weak evidence Humans and monkeys showed strikingly similar behavior After errors both slowed down the decision making process but the pattern of slowing depended on the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/mistakes-brain-slow-down-1094312-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • For US voters, skin tone matters when there's instability - Futurity
    This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print When the system is shaky both blacks and whites show strong preferences for preserving the status quo and so express greater interest in a lighter skinned candidate says Chadly Stern Credit jamelah e Flickr For US voters skin tone matters when there s instability New York University Rutgers University University of Chicago right Original Study Posted by James Devitt NYU on January 11 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Both black and white Americans show a preference for lighter skinned over darker skinned political candidates when they think the government is unstable a new study finds Also white Americans show a preference for lighter skinned candidates if they feel the political position is important regardless of whether they think the government is stable or not Alternatively blacks express greater interest in voting for a darker skinned candidate when they see the government as stable Our results show that when the system is seen as running smoothly people engage in behaviors to enhance the social standing of their group which explains preferences for a darker skinned candidate among the study s black participants says Chadly Stern a doctoral candidate in New York University s psychology department and the study s lead author However when the system is shaky both blacks and whites show strong preferences for preserving the status quo and so express greater interest in a lighter skinned candidate Altered photos In a series of experiments subjects were shown photographs of a hypothetical candidate for public office the images used were of a man whom the study s participants would be unlikely to recognize 32 year old Canadian hockey player Jarome Iginla wearing a suit and tie whose father is a black Nigerian and whose mother is a white American The researchers created three different versions of the photographs one was unaltered one was changed to lighten Iginla s skin tone and one was changed to darken it Why politicians with deeper voices get more votes In the experiments participants were asked to indicate how representative each photo lighter skinned unaltered darker skinned was of the candidate on a 1 not at all to 7 a great deal scale This measure captured the mental image that people held reflecting what they thought the candidate looked like They were also asked to indicate the likelihood that they would vote for the candidate in an election on a 1 not at all likely to 7 very likely scale Previous research has demonstrated that people are more likely to vote for political candidates who most strongly look like members of their racial group Consistent with these previous findings the results showed that whites who saw the lighter skinned photograph as more representative of the candidate reported stronger intentions to vote for him whereas blacks who saw the darker skinned photo as more representative indicated stronger intentions to

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/politics-skin-tone-race-1088252-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Is it a big mistake to ignore minor flu strains? - Futurity
    Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles To be happiest 7 fruits and veggies a day Eave tubes kill mosquitoes as they try to get inside Anxiety relief lasts long after workout Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Current vaccines target the dominant strains because they are the ones that seem to infect the largest number of individuals says Elodie Ghedin But our findings reveal an ability of minor strains to elude these vaccines and spread the virus in ways not previously known Credit iStockphoto Is it a big mistake to ignore minor flu strains New York University right Original Study Posted by James Devitt NYU on January 4 2016 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Minor variants of flu strains which are not typically targeted in vaccines carry a bigger viral punch than previously realized according to a new study that examined samples from the 2009 pandemic in Hong Kong The findings show that minor strains can be transmitted along with major ones and can replicate and elude immunizations A flu virus infection is not a homogeneous mix of viruses but rather a mix of strains that gets transmitted as a swarm in the population says Elodie Ghedin professor in New York University s biology department and College of Global Public Health Current vaccines target the dominant strains because they are the ones that seem to infect the largest number of individuals But our findings reveal an ability of minor strains to elude these vaccines and spread the virus in ways not previously known Software tracks NYC flu outbreak on Twitter It s long been known that the Influenza A virus is marked by a high level of genetic diversity However scientists knowledge largely stems from the dominant strain that is targeted by vaccines Less understood is the diversity of minor strains and how they re able to spread For the study published in the journal Nature Genetics scientists wanted to figure out how many viral particles are transmitted when afflicted with the flu and how many could replicate

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/influenza-vaccines-hong-kong-1084082-2/ (2016-02-11)
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