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  • Team uses satellite maps to give Amazon trees a carbon price tag - Futurity
    University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Network tracks ocean s ebb and flow Gold Rush mercury still washes into food web Beetles point to habitat s role in biodiversity Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Satellites can t see species but species really matter for carbon says Oliver Phillips New satellites will be launched soon that will be more sensitive to forest structure and biomass but we must ensure we have sufficient ecological ground data to correctly interpret and use them Credit Ray Muzyka Flickr Team uses satellite maps to give Amazon trees a carbon price tag University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Rachel Barson Leeds on April 25 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Researchers studying the Amazon Basin have revealed unprecedented details about the size age and species of trees across the region by comparing satellite maps with hundreds of field plots The findings will help assess more accurately the amount of carbon each tree can store a key factor in carbon offset schemes in which trees are given a cash value according to their carbon content and credits can be traded in exchange for preserving trees Existing satellite maps of the area have estimated trees carbon content based largely on their height but don t account for large regional variations in their shape and density The findings could help quantify the amount of carbon available to trade in forest areas This in turn could help administer carbon offsetting more accurately and improve understanding of how much carbon is stored in the world s forests which informs climate change forecasts Satellites can t see species but species really matter for carbon This is the big challenge for the next generation of satellite and field scientists says Oliver Phillips professor of geography at the University of Leeds New satellites will be launched soon that will be more sensitive to forest structure and biomass but we must ensure we have sufficient ecological ground data to correctly interpret and use them Live fast die young

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/survey-prices-carbon-costs-amazon-trees/ (2016-02-11)
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  • DNA sequencing reveals six new forms of blindness - Futurity
    University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Gel plumps up spine s shock absorbers High fructose corn syrup linked to global diabetes Should obesity affect when men get colonoscopies Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Since new therapies are often specific to particular forms of inherited blindness it is essential for each patient to know which condition they have says Chris Inglehearn Credit Kshitiz Anand Flickr DNA sequencing reveals six new forms of blindness University of Leeds Posted by Ben Jones U Leeds on April 7 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have discovered six new forms of inherited blindness each one resulting from mutations in a different gene important in eye development and vision The research carried out by experts from the University of Leeds School of Medicine over the past three years focuses on identifying new genes which when mutated cause these blinding disorders Related Articles On Futurity University of Pennsylvania DNA clues link drinking milk to spread of cattle raising University of California Davis Cornea donor s age not a factor in most transplants University of Nottingham Surprise virus caused blue chicken eggs Pinpointing the exact cause gives clinicians the ability to offer their patients more information about how their condition will progress what risk there is to relatives and in some cases can point to specific treatment A team led by Chris Inglehearn Manir Ali and Carmel Toomes studied local families particularly from the West Yorkshire Pakistani community where such conditions are common in order to track down the genes involved Using DNA technology they sequenced every gene in patients from families in which multiple members were blind from birth due to conditions such as Leber s congenital amaurosis cone rod dystrophy or global defects of eye development Finding these genes is important in many ways As well as directly benefitting

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/dna-sequencing-reveals-six-new-forms-blindness/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Melanoma in families linked to mutations in one gene - Futurity
    of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Drug works better if cancer can t sleep Brain may crave fast food fix Lasers pop tiny chemo balloons to kill cancer Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print With this discovery we should be able to determine who in a family is at risk and in turn who should be regularly screened for early detection says David Adams Credit Maja Larsson Flickr font by Vernon Adams Melanoma in families linked to mutations in one gene University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Ben Jones U Leeds on April 2 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The discovery that mutations in a specific gene are responsible for a hereditary form of melanoma could make it easier to detect and treat experts say People with specific mutations in the POT1 gene which protects the ends of our chromosomes from damage are extremely likely to develop melanoma new research shows These mutations deactivate the POT1 gene This finding significantly increases our understanding of why some families have a high incidence of melanoma says Tim Bishop of the School of Medicine at the University of Leeds and a senior co author of the study published in Nature Genetics Since this gene has previously been identified as a target for the development of new drugs in the future it may be possible that early detection will facilitate better management of this disease With this discovery we should be able to determine who in a family is at risk and in turn who should be regularly screened for early detection adds David Adams co senior author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Related Articles On Futurity Johns Hopkins University Prenatal smoking shows up in little kids blood University of Florida Fix defective genes with nanotubes from plants University

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/gene-mutations-warn-hereditary-skin-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Fear of looking bad makes coaches blow up - Futurity
    Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles A kid s math self concept predicts test scores 3 reasons Americans would accept a gas tax hike ID laws may keep 700 000 youth from voting Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Those who believe others expect them to be perfect appear to have more difficulty controlling their emotions As a consequence they will be more prone to emotional outbursts says Andrew Hill Credit Christina VanMeter Flickr Vic Fieger FontSquirrel Fear of looking bad makes coaches blow up University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Chris Bunting U Leeds on April 1 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The hot tempers of some athletics coaches could come from their excessive concern about how others perceive them according to new research A study finds that coaches who were more focused on their own high standards and less interested in the opinions of others were significantly better at controlling feelings of anger than those who were very focused on others opinions of their performance Related Articles On Futurity University of Michigan Why even online shopping can get embarrassing University College London Unlike chimps humans reject unfair deals Emory University Cocaine before pregnancy can leave kids feeling angry Outbursts of anger from coaches are a familiar feature of many sports at many different levels from Alan Pardew s headbutt to a recent attack by a coach on a linesman in an Under 14 rugby match says study leader Andrew Hill lecturer in sports and exercise science in the University of Leeds Faculty of Biological Sciences This isn t good for anybody You want a calm and analytic mind on the sidelines but we found that some features of personality may make this more difficult The researchers surveyed 238 coaches across a wide range of sports including football rugby hockey netball swimming and horse riding Most of the coaches were involved in amateur sport and their average age was 24 The results show that those with high

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/fear-looking-bad-makes-coaches-blow/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Climate change could lower crop yields by 2030 - Futurity
    University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Men and women disagree on global warming Researchers recreate attack ant chemical Bioengineer a better hydrocarbon Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print We could see on average an increasingly negative effect on crop yields from the 2030s onwards the researchers say The impact will be greatest in the second half of the century when decreases of over 25 percent may become increasingly common Credit USDAgov Flickr Climate change could lower crop yields by 2030 University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Sarah Reed U Leeds on March 17 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Global warming of only 2 degrees Celsius will be detrimental to crops in temperate and tropical regions with reduced yields from the 2030s onwards experts report Our research shows that crop yields will be negatively affected by climate change much earlier than expected says Andy Challinor a professor at the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds and the study s lead author Furthermore the impact of climate change on crops will vary both from year to year and from place to place with the variability becoming greater as the weather becomes increasingly erratic The study published by the journal Nature Climate Change feeds directly into the Working Group II report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC Fifth Assessment Report which is due to be published at the end of March 2014 Rice corn and wheat In the study the researchers created a new data set by combining and comparing results from 1 700 published assessments of the response that climate change will have on the yields of rice maize and wheat Related Articles On Futurity Texas A M University Arctic rivers as climate change forecasters Rutgers University Deep ocean changes may speed climate change University of Florida Mountains erode faster when climate changes The study offers the largest dataset to date on crop responses with more than double the number of studies that were available for researchers to analyze for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 In the Fourth Assessment Report scientists had reported that regions

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/climate-change-lower-crop-yields-2030/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Did nature's 'fuel cells' spark life on Earth? - Futurity
    University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Female flies pick and choose among sperm Tiny telescope discovers two weird planets Elephants born to stressed moms age faster Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print These experiments simulate the electrical energy produced in geological systems so we can also use this to simulate other planetary environments with liquid water like Jupiter s moon Europa or early Mars says Laura Barge Credit NOAA Photo Library Flickr Did nature s fuel cells spark life on Earth University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Sarah Reed Leeds on March 13 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Researchers have developed a new way to simulate the energetic processes that may have led to the emergence of cell metabolism on Earth a crucial biological function for all living organisms The research which is published online today in the journal Astrobiology could help scientists to understand whether it is possible for life to have emerged in similar environments on other worlds What we are trying to do is to bridge the gap between the geological processes of the early Earth and the emergence of biological life on this planet says study co author Terry Kee from the School of Chemistry at the University of Leeds Previously some scientists have proposed that living organisms may have been transported to Earth by meteorites Yet there is more support for the theory that life emerged on Earth in places like hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor forming from inanimate matter such as the chemical compounds found in gases and minerals Related Articles On Futurity Brown University Mars meteorite hints at what s hiding under the dust University of Southampton How to weigh a baby star University at Buffalo How to morph into a superconductor Define life Before biological life one could say the early Earth had geological life It may seem unusual to consider geology involving inanimate rocks and minerals as being alive But what is life says Kee Many people have failed to come up with a satisfactory answer to this question So what we have done instead is to look at what life does and all life forms use the same chemical processes that occur in a fuel cell to generate their energy Fuel cells in cars generate electrical energy by reacting fuels and oxidants This is an example of a redox reaction as one molecule loses electrons is oxidized and one molecule gains electrons is reduced Similarly photosynthesis in plants involves generating electrical energy from the reduction of carbon dioxide into sugars and the oxidation of water into molecular oxygen And respiration in cells in the human body is the oxidation of sugars into carbon dioxide and the reduction of oxygen into water with electrical energy produced in the reaction Certain geological environments such as hydrothermal vents can be considered

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/redox-reactions-spark-life-earth/ (2016-02-11)
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  • As cold snaps wane, mangroves head north - Futurity
    of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Japan s tsunami picked up by radar To protect coasts call on Mother Nature Basic physics may speed up climate modeling Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Florida s climate has seemingly led to significant changes along hundreds of miles of coastline The expansion isn t happening in a vacuum says Kyle Cavanaugh The mangroves are expanding into and invading salt marsh which also provides an important habitat for a variety of species Credit mangrove via Shutterstock font by Tyler Finck FontSquirrel As cold snaps wane mangroves head north Brown University University of Maryland right Original Study Posted by David Orenstein Brown on December 31 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Prompted by one less hard freeze a year protected mangrove trees risk becoming an invasive species as they expand northward along the Atlantic coast of Florida That surprising finding reported by a team of ecologists in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences illustrates the speed and scale on which alterations in climate extremes have affected crucial ecosystems Going back 28 years a resident of Palm Coast could have encountered some mangrove forests Those same forests are now about 100 percent greater according to researchers measurements which are based on analysis of satellite imagery of the coastal area mangroves A very harsh winter in 1989 caused mortality in mangroves and damaged citrus crops Satellite images show how mangroves rebounded when they were no longer threatened by cold snaps Credit Kyle Cavanaugh James Kellner Changes along the Florida coast are already well underway but the effect on the ecosystem and what it might mean for food webs is not certain Credit Kyle Cavanaugh James Kellner Before this work there had been some scattered anecdotal accounts and observations of mangroves appearing in areas where people had not seen them but they were very local says study lead author Kyle Cavanaugh a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University and at the Smithsonian Institution One unique aspect of this work is that we were able to use this incredible time series of large scale satellite imagery to show that this expansion is a regional phenomenon It s a very large scale change Related Articles On Futurity University of Washington If we start and stop geoengineering Earth could heat up fast University of York Tanzania s birds survive in protected network University of Florida Mountains erode faster when climate changes James Kellner assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a senior co author adds that the paper goes beyond merely documenting the northward push of mangrove forests by accounting for the most likely cause Cavanaugh and his colleagues tested various hypotheses by correlating the satellite observations with reams of other data What emerged from their tests of statistical significance was the area s decline in the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/cold-snaps-waning-mangroves-head-north/ (2016-02-11)
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  • For kids, 2 antibiotics aren't better than 1 - Futurity
    Case Western Reserve University Columbia University Cornell University Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Dialysis costs challenge Medicare budget We beats me in depression battle Air pollution is no barrier to exercise Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print For kids 2 antibiotics aren t better than 1 Johns Hopkins University University of Maryland right Original Study Posted by Ekaterina Pesheva Johns Hopkins on August 7 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license JOHNS HOPKINS US One antibiotic is just as likely as two to beat a child s invasive bloodstream infection but at less than half the risk of drug induced kidney damage a new study shows The finding challenges the common practice of preemptively and liberally prescribing combination drug treatments for children with bloodstream infections Many pediatricians continue to prescribe combination drug regimens under the false assumption that two is better than one but our study suggests otherwise says Pranita Tamma an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University One is often just as good as two and a lot safer The two drug regimen includes a class of antibiotics known as aminoglycosides well known for their toxic effects on the kidney The benefit of using those drugs may outweigh the risks in critically ill patients or those suspected to be infected with highly drug resistant organisms But researchers say that even then the need for continued dual therapy should be assessed as soon as bacterial cultures reveal what antibiotics are effective against the infectious organisms The results of those tests are usually available within 48 to 72 hours of diagnosis The aminoglycoside portion of the regimen should be continued only in cases of highly drug resistant infections Tamma says For the study published in JAMA Pediatrics researchers reviewed 879 cases

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/for-kids-2-antibiotics-arent-better-than-1/ (2016-02-11)
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