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  • Computers could be our best weapon to fight the flu - Futurity
    impulsive behavior Menopause moves fat to women s hearts Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Computer simulation when done very well with all the right physics reveals a huge amount of information that you can t get otherwise Gregory Voth says In principle you could do these calculations with potential drug targets and see how they bind and if they are in fact effective Credit Dennis van Zuijlekom Flickr Computers could be our best weapon to fight the flu University of Chicago right Original Study Posted by Steve Koppes Chicago on June 18 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license We rely on drugs to treat the flu Unfortunately many are becoming less effective due to viral evolution Now scientists are using computer simulations to see how the virus replicates and those results may give drug designers the insight they need to develop more powerful flu therapies It s very hard to design a drug if you don t understand how the disease functions says Gregory Voth professor of chemistry at the University of Chicago The influenza drug Amantadine is a bulky organic compound originally designed to treat influenza A by blocking proton flow through the M2 channel one of the few proteins that are targets for antiviral therapies The proton flow is essential for influenza viral replication says Voth who also is director of the Center for Multiscale Theory and Simulation Unfortunately subsequent mutations in different forms of the flu have changed the ability of Amantadine to bind to the M2 protein There s a big worldwide push to find new drugs that will block this or other influenza proteins Voth says Dr Voth and his colleagues have simulated the process of proton transfer through the M2 channel and the effects of mutations that cause resistance to drugs that block this channel at a level of detail not previously possible says Peter Preusch of the National Institutes of Health s National Institute of General Medical Sciences which funded the research This work helps expand the methods for molecular simulation available to researchers and may eventually lead to new and better drugs to treat influenza infections Info you can t get otherwise The team conducted extensive multiscale simulations of proton permeation a critical step in viral replication through the M2 channel from influenza A Related Articles On Futurity Stanford University Algorithm lets thoughts control the cursor University of Michigan Lock in peacock color for screen displays University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Hummingbirds and bugs share flight tricks The simulations enabled them to visualize this process at three interconnected scales from the electronic the smallest to the molecular intermediate to the mesoscopic the largest The capability of the technique was demonstrated by last year s Nobel Prize in Chemistry which was awarded to three scientists for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems Computer simulation when done

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/smallest-largest-tests-reveals-flus-weak-spot/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Surprising 'hot zone' detected under Antarctica - Futurity
    the precious data A team maintains a seismic station on Thwaites Glacier an area of heavy snowfall The seismometer is in the orange dome in the lowest part of the three step snow pit Credit Mike Roberts This is the first time seismologists have been able to deploy instruments rugged enough to survive a winter in this part of the frozen continent The team used the instrument s recordings of reverberations of distant earthquakes from January 2010 to January 2012 to create maps of seismic velocities beneath the rift valley An analysis of the maps was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth Not surprisingly the maps show a giant blob of superheated rock about 60 miles beneath Mount Sidley the last of a chain of volcanic mountains in Marie Byrd Land at one end of the transect More surprisingly they reveal hot rock beneath the Bentley Subglacial Trench a deep basin at the other end of the transect The Bentley Subglacial Trench is part of the West Antarctic Rift System and hot rock beneath the region indicates that this part of the rift system was active quite recently Like a blowtorch Mount Sidley the highest volcano in Antarctica sits directly above a hot region in the mantle Lloyd says Mount Sidley is the southernmost mountain in a volcanic mountain range in Marie Byrd Land a mountainous region dotted with volcanoes near the coast of West Antarctica A line of volcanoes hints there might be a hidden mantle plume like a blowtorch beneath the plate says Doug Wiens professor of earth and planetary sciences and a coauthor of the paper The volcanoes would pop up in a row as the plate moved over it But it s a bit unclear if this is happening here he adds We think we know which direction the plate is moving but the volcanic chain is going in a different direction and two additional nearby volcanic chains are oriented in yet other directions If this was just a plate moving over a couple of mantle plumes you d expect them to line up as they do in the Hawaiian Islands he says Although the hot zone s shape is ill defined it is clear there is higher heat flow into the base of the ice sheet in this area Wiens says Lowest point on Earth The most interesting finding Lloyd says is the discovery of a hot zone beneath the Bentley Subglacial Trench The basin is part of the West Antarctic Rift System a series of rifts adjacent to the Transantarctic Mountains along which the continent was stretched and thinned The topography of West Antarctica below the ice sheet as viewed from above looking toward the Antarctic Peninsula Much of West Antarctica is a basin that lies below sea level blue although it is currently filled with ice not water West Antarctica was stretched and thinned as it moved away from East Antarctica forming one of the world s largest continental rift

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/antarctica-hot-zone-1066352-2/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Laser pinpoints tiniest traces of explosive - Futurity
    University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles In Australia volcano s past sounds alarm about next eruption Man drives his wheelchair with tongue piercing There s something invisible around 850 dark galaxies Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Not only does the laser detect explosive material but it also provides an image of the chemical s exact location even if it s merely a tiny trace on a zipper Credit Michigan State University Laser pinpoints tiniest traces of explosive Michigan State University right Original Study Posted by Layne Cameron Michigan State on September 9 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A bomb detecting laser that can find micro traces of explosive chemicals on clothes and luggage could improve security at airport checkpoints researchers say Since this method uses a single beam and requires no bulky spectrometers it is quite practical and could scan many people and their belongings quickly says Marcos Dantus chemistry professor at Michigan State University Not only does it detect the explosive material but it also provides an image of the chemical s exact location even if it s merely a minute trace on a zipper Marcos Dantus front says his bomb detecting laser could be used at security checkpoints Credit Michigan State University This doesn t mean that security will be armed with handheld lasers in airports The laser would more likely be in a conveyor belt like the X ray scanners already used for airport security The low energy laser is safe to use on luggage as well as passengers Dantus says For decades scientists have been working to develop lasers that are powerful enough for detection but safe enough to use on people Dantus initial spark came from a collaboration with Harvard University that developed a laser that could be used to detect cancer but has the beam output of a simple presentation

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/laser-pinpoints-tiniest-trace-explosive/ (2016-02-12)
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  • DNA motor uses arms to walk across a nanotube - Futurity
    University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Hippo named for Mick Jagger had quite the muzzle Step closer to genetically engineered E coli Organic semiconductors on fast track Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Our motors extract chemical energy from RNA molecules decorated on the nanotubes and use that energy to fuel autonomous walking along the carbon nanotube track Jong Hyun Choi says Credit Shutterstock DNA motor uses arms to walk across a nanotube Purdue University right Original Study Posted by Emil Venere Purdue on December 19 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Engineers made a motor out of DNA and then used it to move nanoparticles of cadmium disulfide along the length of a nanotube The design was inspired by natural biological motors that have evolved to perform specific tasks critical to the function of cells says Jong Hyun Choi a Purdue University assistant professor of mechanical engineering Whereas biological motors are made of protein researchers are trying to create synthetic motors based on DNA the genetic materials in cells that consist of a sequence of four chemical bases adenine guanine cytosine and thymine Related Articles On Futurity University of Pittsburgh Self moving gel lets material talk to itself Brown University Fruit flies boast I m not dead yet gene mutations Michigan State University For future biofuel plant stores oil in leaves The walking mechanism of the synthetic motors is far slower than the mobility of natural motors However the natural motors cannot be controlled and they don t function outside their natural environment whereas DNA based motors are more stable and might be switched on and off Choi explains We are in the very early stages of developing these kinds of synthetic molecular motors he says New findings were detailed in a paper published this month in the journal Nature Nanotechnology In coming decades such molecular motors might find uses in drug delivery manufacturing and chemical processing Harvests energy as it

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/dna-motor-uses-arms-walk-across-nanotube/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Electronic device puts strain on nanowires - Futurity
    University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Solar power potty wins toilet challenge Airline pilots admit their minds wander Genome shows macaw is one smart bird Electronic device puts strain on nanowires Georgia Institute of Technology Posted by John Toon Georgia Tech on September 6 2010 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license GEORGIA TECH US A new class of electronic logic device generates a current switching electric field by applying mechanical strain to zinc oxide nanowires The strain could be as simple as pushing a button or be created by the flow of a liquid stretching of muscles or the movement of a robotic component The devices which include transistors and diodes could be used in nanometer scale robotics and very small electromechanical systems When we apply a strain to a nanowire placed across two metal electrodes we create a field which is strong enough to serve as the gating voltage says Zhong Lin Wang a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology This type of device would allow mechanical action to be interfaced with electronics and could be the basis for a new form of logic device that uses the piezoelectric potential in place of a gate voltage In traditional field effect transistors an electrical field switches or gates the flow of electrical current through a semiconductor Instead of using an electrical signal the new logic devices create the switching field by mechanically deforming zinc oxide nanowires The deformation creates strain in the nanowires generating an electric field through the piezoelectric effect which creates electrical charge in certain crystalline materials when they are subjected to mechanical strain Wang who has published a series of articles on the devices in such journals as Nano Letters Advanced Materials and Applied Physics Letters calls this new class of nanometer scale device piezotronics because they use piezoelectric potential to tune and gate the charge transport process in semiconductors Researchers at Georgia Tech study zinc oxide devices on flexible substrate Credit Gary Meek The devices rely on the unique properties of zinc oxide nanostructures which are both semiconducting and piezoelectric The transistors and diodes add to the family of nanodevices developed by Wang and his research team and could be combined into systems in which all components are based on the same zinc oxide material The researchers have previously announced development of nanometer scale generators that produce a voltage by converting mechanical motion from the environment and nanowire sensors for measuring pH and detecting ultraviolet light The family of

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/electronic-device-puts-strain-on-nanowires/ (2016-02-12)
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  • This foam 'pump' works like a human heart - Futurity
    Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Chocoholics Are some foods made to be addictive AIDS patients learn to boost their kids abilities 53 million kids are reservoirs for tuberculosis Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print A soft foam water pump molded in the shape of a human heart Credit Cornell This foam pump works like a human heart Cornell University right Original Study Posted by Krishna Ramanujan Cornell on October 20 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have created a new lightweight and stretchable polymer foam and used it to make a pump that mimics both the shape and function of a human heart The foam is unique because it can be formed and has connected pores that allow fluids to be pumped through it Scientists say it has the potential for use in other artificial organs as well as prosthetic body parts and soft robotics The polymer foam starts as a liquid that can be poured into a mold to create shapes Because of the pathways for fluids when air or liquid is pumped through it the material moves and can change its length by 300 percent While applications for use inside the body require federal approval and testing researchers say they re close to making prosthetic body parts with the so called elastomer foam Metal foam sandwich is bendy but strong We are currently pretty far along for making a prosthetic hand this way says Rob Shepherd assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University The porous channels are made by mixing salt with the rubbery elastomer when it s still a liquid Once the elastomer cures and hardens the salt is removed To seal an organ or prosthetic so air or fluid can be pumped through it without escaping researchers coated the outside with the same polymer but without the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/foam-artificial-hearts-prosthetics-1028882/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Drop an internet in the ocean to detect tsunamis - Futurity
    Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles How do plants remember past droughts Beam pens write nanotech s next chapter Bend it like bright LED screens Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Making this information available to anyone with a smartphone or computer especially when a tsunami or other type of disaster occurs could help save lives Tommaso Melodia says Credit Great Beyond Flickr Drop an internet in the ocean to detect tsunamis University at Buffalo right Original Study Posted by Cory Nealon Buffalo on October 14 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A deep sea internet network is expected to improve the way scientists detect tsunamis monitor pollution and conduct surveillance A submerged wireless network will give us an unprecedented ability to collect and analyze data from our oceans in real time says Tommaso Melodia associate professor of electrical engineering at the University at Buffalo and the project s lead researcher Making this information available to anyone with a smartphone or computer especially when a tsunami or other type of disaster occurs could help save lives To test an underwater internet system researchers Hovannes Kulhandjian and Zahed Hossain recently dropped two 40 pound sensors into Lake Erie and typed a command into a laptop computer Seconds later a series of high pitched chirps ricocheted off a nearby concrete wall an indication that the test worked Credit Douglas Levere Related Articles On Futurity University of Sheffield Titanic didn t sail in unlucky year for icebergs University of California Davis Japan s tsunami picked up by radar Yale University Think you re so smart It might just be Google Melodia will present his paper at the Association for Computing Machinery s 8th annual International Conference on Underwater Networks Systems in Taiwan Nov 11 13 Land based wireless networks rely on radio waves that transmit data via satellites and antennae Unfortunately radio waves work poorly underwater which is why agencies like the Navy and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration use sound wave based techniques to communicate underwater For example NOAA relies on acoustic waves to send data from tsunami sensors on the sea floor to surface buoys The buoys convert the acoustic waves into radio waves to send the data to a satellite which then redirects the radio waves back to land based computers Many systems worldwide employ this paradigm says

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/internet-takes-plunge-sea/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Layne Cameron-Michigan State, Author at Futurity
    Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Layne Cameron Michigan State Michigan State University Biologist busts the myth of the unicorn bacteria Plant biologist Maren Friesen has been on a quest to find near mythical bacteria that fix their own nitrogen She explains why she chased down this unicorn READ MORE Michigan State University Polar bears prove smarter animals have bigger brains To figure out if a bigger brain can predict intelligence researchers traveled to nine US zoos and put 140 animals to the test READ MORE Michigan State University Listen New bird found in India is incredibly musical A very musical song helped scientists discover a new bird species in the forests of India Listen to it sing READ MORE Michigan State University University of California Davis Wild bee supply doesn t match the demand 3 billion of the US agricultural economy depends on native pollinators The loss of wild bees could destabilize crop production research shows READ MORE Michigan State University Hear the birds from the 12 Days of Christmas The classic partridge in a pear tree and all its fellow birds in the Christmas song The 12 Days of Christmas would make a racket Listen to them here READ MORE Michigan State University Can we engineer attack proof plants Some pathogens trick plants by hijacking their alarm system and sneaking in A new study suggests it s possible to engineer hijack proof plants READ MORE Michigan State University Rice University University of California Santa Barbara Is ecology too quick to say species are cheating Is cheating really widespread among mutualists species that cooperate for mutual benefit A new study doesn t find much evidence to back up that theory READ MORE Michigan State University Swiss Army knife helps turn algae into biofuel Scientists have built in a year what took millions of years to evolve naturally a protein that streamlines the machinery that turns algae into biofuels READ MORE Michigan State University This protein naturally fights HIV Scientists say a natural protein stops HIV from replicating We see a way to treat this disease

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/michigan-state-cameron/ (2016-02-12)
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