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  • Price tag for prostate surgery in US: $10,000 to $135,000 - Futurity
    how well hospitals perform prostate cancer surgeries as they report outcome data mostly only to government agencies That lack of transparency is a huge problem Bradley Erickson says Credit iStockphoto Price tag for prostate surgery in US 10 000 to 135 000 University of Iowa right Original Study Posted by Richard Lewis Iowa on June 11 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The cost of prostate cancer at US hospitals vary widely and researchers say a lack of transparency makes it difficult to figure out why A new study from the University of Iowa compared the cost of prostate cancer surgery at 100 hospitals throughout the United States The quote for the procedure the researchers found varied from 10 100 to 135 000 a 13 fold range The average price was nearly 35 000 more than double the Medicare reimbursement Only 10 of the hospitals that provided cost information divulged anesthesia and surgeon costs key criteria to consider when pricing a surgical procedure Moreover just three hospitals provided a hard copy of the charges further complicating a patient s ability to compare costs the study shows Hospitals in the northeast US charged most at 40 802 on average while hospitals in the South charged the least 30 305 on average Credit U Iowa Such variability in pricing can produce significant confusion for consumers who are accustomed to the rules of free market economics which equate higher fees with higher quality write the researchers in the journal Urology Unfortunately in health care this has not been found to be true Prostate disease accounts for 28 percent of all new cancer diagnoses in men in the United States and nearly 12 billion in treatment costs according to the American Cancer Society About 138 000 prostate cancer surgeries are performed yearly according to government figures These charges don t mean anything Yet despite the commonness of the disease and the frequency of surgeries getting a reliable accurate quote is hard to come by Related Articles On Futurity University of Michigan After divorce many women lose health insurance Cornell University Is health care reform Robin Hood in reverse University of Iowa California ended Medicaid for dental care Big mistake Part of that is due to the system itself What hospitals charge for a procedure doesn t reflect the actual costs says Bradley Erickson assistant professor in urology and corresponding author on the study Think of the hospital s quote as the opening salvo in a negotiation a give and take primarily with the health insurance provider over how much the hospital gets reimbursed In that scenario the higher the quote the more room there is to negotiate and thus arguably the more the hospital could get reimbursed These hospital charges don t mean anything Erickson notes There s no weight behind them What that all means is the consumer is working with inflated figures at best which puts them at a significant disadvantage Erickson says

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/cost-prostate-surgery/ (2016-02-12)
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  • How lasers make metal super water repellent - Futurity
    Credit J Adam Fenster U Rochester Credit J Adam Fenster U Rochester Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print How lasers make metal super water repellent University of Rochester right Original Study Posted by Leonor Sierra Rochester on January 20 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have used lasers to turn metals into extremely water repellent materials without the need for temporary coatings Water repellent or super hydrophobic materials are desirable for a number of applications such as rust prevention anti icing or even sanitation However as researcher Chunlei Guo explains most current hydrophobic materials rely on chemical coatings In a paper published today in the Journal of Applied Physics Guo and Anatoliy Vorobyev both of the University of Rochester s Institute of Optics describe a powerful and precise laser patterning technique that creates an intricate pattern of micro and nanoscale structures to give the metals their new properties This work builds on earlier research by the team in which they used a similar laser patterning technique that turned metals black Guo says that with this technique they can create multifunctional surfaces that are not only super hydrophobic but also highly absorbent optically Guo adds that one of the big advantages of his team s process is that the structures created by our laser on the metals are intrinsically part of the material surface That means they won t rub off And it is these patterns that make the metals repel water The material is so strongly water repellent the water actually gets bounced off Then it lands on the surface again gets bounced off again and then it will just roll off from the surface says Guo a professor of optics That whole process takes less than a second More slippery than Teflon The materials Guo has created are much more slippery than Teflon a common hydrophobic material that often coats nonstick frying pans Unlike Guo s laser treated metals the Teflon kitchen tools are not super hydrophobic The difference is that to make water to roll off a Teflon coated material you need to tilt the surface to nearly a 70 degree angle before the water begins to slide off You can make water roll off Guo s metals by tilting them less than five degrees As the water bounces off the super hydrophobic surfaces it also collects dust particles and takes them along for the ride To test this self cleaning property Guo and his team took ordinary dust from a vacuum cleaner and dumped it onto the treated surface Roughly half of the dust particles were removed with just three drops of water It took only a dozen drops to leave the surface spotless Better yet it remains completely dry Latrines and funnels Guo is excited by potential applications of super hydrophobic materials in developing countries In these regions collecting rain water is vital and

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/super-hydrophobic-material-841542/ (2016-02-12)
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  • DNA put to work on assembly line - Futurity
    University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles How food can build better lithium batteries Big brain lets larva see without seeing In Milky Way 60 billion planets in habitable zone DNA put to work on assembly line New York University Posted by James Devitt NYU on May 12 2010 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license NYU US A newly constructed DNA assembly line has the potential to produce novel materials efficiently on the nanoscale reports an international team of chemists Researchers from New York University and China s Nanjing University outline details of the work in the latest issue of the journal Nature An industrial assembly line includes a factory workers and a conveyor system says NYU chemistry professor Nadrian Seeman the study s senior author We have emulated each of those features using DNA components The assembly line relies on three DNA based components The first is DNA origami a composition that uses a few hundred short DNA strands to direct

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/dna-put-to-work-on-assembly-line/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 'Kind' device measures force of bird flight - Futurity
    Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Horses are likely related to this animal from India Abalone plume draws in sperm First flowering plant lived alongside iguanadon Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The video below shows slow motion footage of Pacific parrotlets Ray and Gaga in the device Credit Pacific parrotlet via Shutterstock Kind device measures force of bird flight Stanford University right Original Study Posted by Bjorn Carey Stanford on January 16 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have long wondered how exactly birds generate lift during flight A new device precisely and humanely measures the forces generated by a bird s wings as it flies The work published in the journal Interface promises to answer many mysteries of bird flight Those findings could be useful in the design of innovative and efficient unpiloted aerial vehicles known as UAVs or more recently drones Measuring the lift forces of a bird in free flight has been a holy grail for biomechanical engineers says lead author David Lentink an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University But every technique developed so far has provided uncertain results Experiments that involve measuring airflow over the bird and extrapolating force from that suffer when the flow becomes turbulent Measuring the flow also requires strong lasers which can put the birds in harm s way Because of this Lentink s lab has developed special tiny goggles to shield birds eyes Alternative techniques rely on measuring the bird s body motion to calculate the acceleration produced by its body parts but that requires a post flight dissection to determine the associated body masses in order to calculate how much force the bird exerted We ve developed a way for the bird to just freely fly in a nice environment It s a very animal friendly method and very precise too Lentink says We reward the birds with seed for their flight We have happy birds and happy researchers afterward A very sensitive system Lentink calls his device an aerodynamic force platform and it works very similarly to the force platforms that have allowed bioengineers to study the forces that humans exert to walk or run It s a box the size and shape of a large birdcage with an acrylic observation window and two bird perches inside Supersensitive force sensors are attached to the bottom of the box This force transfer is based on Newton s third law of motion which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction As the bird flies perch to perch each beat of its wings pushes against the air which in turn pushes against the bottom of the box and also sucks down the ceiling slightly These forces are recorded to produce a precise measurement for each stroke of the bird s wings Each wing beat lasts 50 milliseconds and the sensors

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/birds-flight-lift-839522/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Cameras work together to track a single person - Futurity
    encrypted before it s sent to the cloud Cameras and recording won t go away We might as well take advantage of that fact and extract more useful information for the benefit of the community Credit iStockphoto Cameras work together to track a single person University of Washington Posted by Michelle Ma Washington on November 17 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Cameras are all around us on store ceilings public transportation and even car dashboards The recordings can be a powerful surveillance tool on the roads and in buildings but it s surprisingly hard to sift through vast amounts of visual data to find relevant information Specifically it s been difficult to quickly identify and understand a person s actions and behaviors as recorded sequentially by cameras in a variety of locations Now electrical engineers have developed a way to automatically track people across moving and still cameras by using an algorithm that trains the networked cameras to learn one another s differences The cameras first identify a person in a video frame then follow that same person across multiple camera views The cameras communicate Tracking humans automatically across cameras in a three dimensional space is new says lead researcher Jenq Neng Hwang a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Washington As the cameras talk to each other we are able to describe the real world in a more dynamic sense Related Articles On Futurity Stanford University Algorithm lets thoughts control the cursor University of Illinois Computer reads news to predict conflicts Georgia Institute of Technology Wet dogs can shake dry in milliseconds Imagine a typical GPS display that maps the streets buildings and signs in a neighborhood as your car moves forward then add humans to the picture With the new technology a car with a mounted camera could take video of the scene then identify and track humans and overlay them into the virtual 3D map on your GPS screen The researchers are developing this to work in real time which could help pick out people crossing in busy intersections or track a specific person who is dodging the police Our idea is to enable the dynamic visualization of the realistic situation of humans walking on the road and sidewalks so eventually people can see the animated version of the real time dynamics of city streets on a platform like Google Earth Hwang says Hwang s research team in the past decade has developed a way for video cameras from the most basic models to high end devices to talk to each other as they record different places in a common location Color texture angle The problem with tracking a human across cameras of non overlapping fields of view is that a person s appearance can vary dramatically in each video because of different perspectives angles and color hues produced by different cameras The researchers overcame this by building a link between the cameras Cameras first

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/cameras-surveillance-803452/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Captive hyenas think 'outside the box' - Futurity
    College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Brain has working memory times 3 Add detectors to better measure photons Cheating monkeys try to hide their infidelity Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Captive hyenas think outside the box Michigan State University right Original Study Posted by Layne Cameron Michigan State on January 8 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license MICHIGAN STATE US The creativity of hyenas in captivity make them better puzzle solvers than their counterparts in the wild Testing animals ability to solve new problems has been historically conducted on captive animals but applying lessons learned from them to those living in the wild is potentially problematic because they may not accurately portray how wild animals respond to new challenges httpv www youtube com watch v O9SbDok6auU Only recently has a shift been made to put animals in their natural habitat to the test A new study appearing in the journal Animal

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/captive-hyenas-think-outside-the-box/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Politics drive a wedge in charitable giving - Futurity
    Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles To map votes atlas digs below polls Berkeley s soda tax does a slow fizzle If Cronkite wasn t TV s first anchorman who was Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Politics drive a wedge in charitable giving Penn State Rice University right Original Study Posted by Amy Hodges Rice on June 1 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license RICE PENN STATE US Americans are more likely to donate to a charity that reflects the values of their political affiliation a series of studies shows The political divide not only impacts political actions but everyday actions such as donating to charity says Vikas Mittal professor of marketing at Rice University When you ask people if their donation behavior to a charity helping children will change because of their political leanings most say Of course not We wanted to see if that is true or not The paper which will appear in the International Journal of Research in Marketing Special Issue on Consumer Identities is based on three studies two of which comprised nationally representative samples of adults and another based on a randomized experiment with students Researchers asked why liberals or conservatives would donate more or less to a specific charity Donations to a specific charity by Republicans and Democrats are strongly affected by their perceptions of the charity s alignment with each party s respective moral foundations Mittal says Republicans moral foundations are embedded in respect for authority and traditions loyalty and purity Democrats moral foundations are rooted in equality and protection from harm Participants were presented with a description of the same charity Rebuilding Together However the researchers subtly changed small parts of the description to suggest that the charity was either supporting American traditions and loyalty or ensuring equality Among participants who indicated that morals are highly important they found that Republicans were almost three times as likely as Democrats to donate when the charity was described as supporting working American families following traditions and supporting their communities that is Republican moral foundations In contrast Democrats were twice as likely as Republicans to donate when the charity was described as ensuring the protection of a home to every individual The findings were supported in two additional studies that focused on children s charities including one for children s advocacy which seeks to break the cycle

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/politics-drive-a-wedge-in-charitable-giving/ (2016-02-12)
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  • How wheat (not rice) made northern Chinese people outgoing - Futurity
    0 International license A new study finds that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years whereas the north has grown wheat It s easy to think of China as a single culture but we found that China has very distinct northern and southern psychological cultures and that southern China s history of rice farming can explain why people in southern China are more interdependent than people in the wheat growing north says lead author Thomas Talhelm a doctoral student in cultural psychology at the University of Virginia He calls it the rice theory In Science Talhelm and his coauthors at universities in China and at the University of Michigan propose that the methods of cooperative rice farming common to southern China for generations make the culture in that region interdependent while people in the wheat growing north are more individualistic a reflection of the independent form of farming practiced there over hundreds of years The data suggests that legacies of farming are continuing to affect people in the modern world Talhelm says It has resulted in two distinct cultural psychologies that mirror the differences between East Asia and the West I think the rice theory provides some insight to why the rice growing regions of East Asia are less individualistic than the Western world or northern China even with their wealth and modernization says Thomas Talhelm Credit Magalie L Abbé Flickr It s not the climate According to Talhelm Chinese people have long been aware of cultural differences between the north region and the southern which are divided by the Yangtze River the largest river in China flowing west to east across the vast country People in the north are thought to be more aggressive and independent while people to the south are considered more cooperative and interdependent Related Articles On Futurity Purdue University Why top herbicide can t kill superweeds Stony Brook University Lung infection was mummy maiden s curse Washington University in St Louis Monument tells tale of Maya Snake Queen This has sometimes been attributed to different climates warmer in the south colder in the north which certainly affects agriculture but it appears to be more related to what Chinese people have been growing for thousands of years Talhelm says He notes that rice farming is extremely labor intensive requiring about twice the number of hours from planting to harvest as does wheat And because most rice is grown on irrigated land requiring the sharing of water and the building of dikes and canals that constantly require maintenance rice farmers must work together to develop and maintain an infrastructure upon which all depend This Talhelm argues has led to the interdependent culture in the southern region Wheat on the other hand is grown on dry land relying on rain for moisture Farmers

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/rice_wheat_china_mindsets/ (2016-02-12)
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