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  • Traces of ancient lungs in fish bladders - Futurity
    University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles With Facelock never forget your password again Like tiny predators ticks hunt wary prey Goalie algorithm shows it s all about timing Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Traces of ancient lungs in fish bladders Cornell University right Original Study Posted by George Lowery Cornell on February 8 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license CORNELL US New research that uses computed tomography CT technology goes a long way toward showing that lungs and gas bladders in fish are variations of the same organ Researchers say one of the great problems of evolution is to understand how the major features of organisms have changed over great swaths of time How did limbs evolve from fins How did bird feathers arise from scales The lung is a major organ of great functional importance for vertebrates animals with backbones For 150 years biologists have debated the idea that in living fishes gas bladders internal bags of air to which fishes can add or eliminate oxygen to control buoyancy are simply a modified version of an ancestral pair of lungs Some have argued that the two are completely different organs By proving that several ray finned fishes namely sturgeons and paddlefishes as well as bowfin have pulmonary arteries like those that supply the lungs of vertebrates researchers show that the common ancestor of all these fishes must have originally had lungs supplied by a pulmonary artery Micro CT enabled researchers to look at resolutions of 25 microns about the width of a human hair This is biology as we ve never been able to see it before says Amy McCune professor and chair of ecology and evolutionary biology at Cornell University and co author a study published online in the Journal of Morphology We re studying biological diversity from the inside out W

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/traces-of-ancient-lungs-in-fish-bladders/ (2016-02-12)
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  • New Einstein papers: He feared for his safety - Futurity
    Cornell University Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Tempered talks reduce teen pot use After divorce journals may hurt not heal Relax immigration for the economy s sake Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print New Einstein papers He feared for his safety California Institute of Technology Posted by Brian Bell Caltech on September 25 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license CALTECH US A newly released volume of Einstein s papers covers a turbulent 15 months in his life and includes previously unpublished letters some expressing desire for a normal life In the fall of 1922 when Albert Einstein s Nobel Prize in Physics was announced the already famous physicist was on a steamer headed for Japan The detailed and poetic travel diary he kept during his journey to Japan Palestine and Spain is among the documents included in the latest volume in the Einstein Papers Project The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein Volume 13 The Berlin Years Writings Correspondence January 1922 March 1923 Documentary Edition which is scheduled for release today September 25 Einstein and his wife Elsa aboard the SS Kitano Maru en route to Japan October 1922 Credit Caltech The scientist s writings convey a feeling of restlessness and a strong desire to escape the demands of his increased fame and heightened visibility His diary entries paint a vivid picture of an Einstein who fearful for his safety following the assassination of his friend the German foreign minister Walter Rathenau decided to leave his home in Berlin and contemplated leaving academic life entirely but who thoroughly enjoyed the sights and peoples he encountered for the first time on his six month long voyage This latest volume is extraordinarily rich and illuminates in great detail Einstein s scientific work and

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/new-einstein-papers-he-feared-for-his-safety/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Whites prefer whites when dating online - Futurity
    University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles More video games more attention trouble How to avoid saying oops I did it again Racial stereotypes linked to health care disparity Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Whites prefer whites when dating online University of California Berkeley Posted by Yasmin Anwar UC Berkeley on February 16 2011 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license UC BERKELEY US The quest for a post racial society continues even in the world of online dating new research shows Data from more than 1 million profiles of singles looking for love online confirms that whites overwhelmingly prefer to date members of their own race The same is not true for blacks especially men who are far more likely to cross the race barrier to meet a mate Researchers at the University of California Berkeley analyzed the racial preferences and online activity of people from the United States who subscribed between 2009 and 2010 to a major Internet dating service In their profiles the online daters stated if they had a racial preference Researchers were then able to compare the online daters stated preferences with whom they actually contacted for a date and they found profound differences between blacks and whites Those who said they were indifferent to the race of a partner were most likely to be young male and black says Gerald Mendelsohn a psychologist professor of graduate studies and lead author of the study which will soon be submitted for publication Overall he said Whites more than blacks women more than men and old more than young participants stated a preference for a partner of the same race The reluctance of whites to contact blacks was true even for those who claimed they were indifferent to race More than 80 percent of the whites contacted whites and fewer than 5 percent of them contacted blacks a disparity that held for young as well as for older participants Were they hypocritical Alert to the realities of the social world Striving for political correctness Attempting an optimizing strategy of self presentation Our data do not permit us to choose among those alternatives the study authors write An estimated one in five Americans has used an online dating service such as eHarmony or Match com and a growing number of urbanites are finding romance via Facebook and other social networking sites The percentage of couples who have met online is now

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/whites-prefer-whites-when-dating-online/ (2016-02-12)
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  • U.K. public leery of military action with U.S. - Futurity
    University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Gaps in state car seat laws put kids at risk People with less power tend to be more trusting 4 reasons people can t quite quit Facebook U K public leery of military action with U S University of Leeds Posted by Richard Ashby Leeds on February 10 2010 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Seven in 10 respondents to a recent survey in the U K were opposed to military action as partners of the United States However a similar number felt such action would be acceptable if it were part of a United Nations operation and just over two thirds agreed with joining engagements led by NATO Courtesy University of Leeds U LEEDS UK The majority of the British public prefer military coalitions and are opposed to taking military action either alone or alongside the USA and its partners according to a major survey of public attitudes Seven in 10 respondents were opposed to military action as partners of the United States However a similar number felt such action would be acceptable if it were part of a United Nations operation and just over two thirds agreed with joining engagements led by NATO The online survey conducted by researchers at the University of Leeds and University of Strathclyde also found that 74 per cent of people also believe that too little is being spent on equipping the country s armed forces However 68 per cent thought the U K was investing too much in supporting the military activities of the U S A majority 53 per cent also agreed or strongly agreed that Britain was too small a country to be policing the world The study also found 45 per cent thought it would be acceptable for the U K to be part of an E U operation 76 per cent thought it essential for the U K to work with other nations to solve problems such as hunger and climate change 39 per cent believed the U K was sending too much aid to developing countries 36 per cent believed the U K should not concern itself with world affairs but should instead concentrate on domestic matters The results of the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/u-k-public-leery-of-military-action-with-u-s/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Should colleges drop calculators in math class? - Futurity
    University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Bad deeds can tarnish money s value Get a grip It may help you live longer Map shows where entrepreneurs thrive in US Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Should colleges drop calculators in math class University of Pittsburgh right Original Study Posted by B Rose Huber Pittsburgh on November 13 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U PITTSBURGH US Math instructors promoting calculator usage in college classrooms may want to rethink their teaching strategies That s according to Samuel King postdoctoral student in the University of Pittsburgh s Learning Research and Development Center who has proposed the need for further research regarding calculators role in the classroom King has conducted a limited study with undergraduate engineering students published in the British Journal of Educational Technology We really can t assume that calculators are helping students says King The goal is to understand the core concepts during the lecture What we found is that use of calculators isn t necessarily helping in that regard Together with Carol Robinson coauthor and director of the Mathematics Education Centre at Loughborough University in England King examined whether the inherent characteristics of the mathematics questions presented to students facilitated a deep or surface approach to learning Using a limited sample size they interviewed 10 second year undergraduate students enrolled in a competitive engineering program The students were given a number of mathematical questions related to sine waves a mathematical function that describes a smooth repetitive oscillation and were allowed to use calculators to answer them More than half of the students adopted the option of using the calculators to solve the problem Instead of being able to accurately represent or visualize a sine wave these students adopted a trial and error method by entering values into a calculator to determine which of the four answers provided was correct says King It was apparent that the students who adopted this approach had limited understanding of the concept as none of them attempted to sketch the sine wave after they worked

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/should-colleges-drop-calculators-in-math-class/ (2016-02-12)
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  • ‘Bling’ could give data storage a big boost - Futurity
    M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Human brain sizes up harmful acts instantly Fungus pharmacist can cure or kill butterflies How left right brain handoffs happen without a hitch Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Bling could give data storage a big boost Johns Hopkins University right Original Study Posted by Phil Sneiderman JHU on May 7 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license JOHNS HOPKINS US Engineers have uncovered new electrical properties of a material used in computer memory by applying pressure with diamond tipped tools The discovery opens the door to more durable drives discs and computer systems that absorb more data more quickly researchers say The research focused on an inexpensive phase change memory alloy called GST composed of germanium antimony and tellurium The material is already commonly used in rewritable optical media including CD RW and DVD RW discs This phase change memory is more stable than the material used in the current flash drives It works 100 times faster and is rewritable about 100 000 times says lead author Ming Xu a doctoral student in materials science and engineering at Johns Hopkins University Within about five years it could also be used to replace hard drives in computers and give them more memory The work was reported in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences GST is called a phase change material because when exposed to heat it can change from an amorphous state in which the atoms lack an ordered arrangement to a crystalline state in which the atoms are neatly lined up in a long range order In its amorphous state GST is more resistant to electric current In its crystalline state it is less resistant The two phases also reflect light differently allowing the surface of a DVD to be read by a tiny laser The two states correspond to one and zero the alphabet of computer language Although this phase change material has been used for at least two decades the precise mechanics of this switch from one state to another have

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/%e2%80%98bling%e2%80%99-could-give-data-storage-a-big-boost/ (2016-02-12)
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  • First boson laser could save power - Futurity
    on May 24 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license STANFORD US Scientists have demonstrated a revolutionary electrically driven polariton laser that could significantly improve the efficiency of lasers The physics powering lasers has remained relatively unchanged through 50 years of use The new system however makes use of the unique physical properties of bosons subatomic particles that scientists have attempted to incorporate into lasers for decades We ve solidified our physical understanding and now it s time we think about how to put these lasers into practice says physicist Na Young Kim a member of the Stanford University team which was led by Yoshihisa Yamamoto professor of electrical engineering and of applied physics This is an exciting era to imagine how this new physics can lead to novel engineering Electrically driven polariton lasers Kim says would operate using one hundredth of the power of conventional lasers and could one day be used in many places from consumer goods to quantum computers The findings are published in Nature Einstein s prediction All lasers are based on Einstein s principle of stimulated emission Charged particles such as electrons exist in discontinuous energy levels like rungs on a ladder An electron provided with enough energy can become excited and jump up to a higher energy level Excited electrons can spontaneously fall down to an available lower energy level shooting off the difference in energy as a bit of light called a photon The amount of time that passes before an excited electron drops down and releases a photon is usually random However Einstein predicted that if an electron in an upper energy level was exposed to a photon with proper energy the electron would instantly fall down and release a second photon identical to the first one A laser keeps this process going by continually providing energy for electrons to move into higher energy levels As more and more electrons are stimulated to release photons the additional photons stimulate more and more electrons Some of the photons are allowed to escape from the device to serve a purpose such as reading data off a CD or etching a circuit board The process however is inefficient There is a hard limit to the number of electrons that can inhabit a given energy level at any given time and conventional lasers waste energy unnecessarily exciting electrons to higher energy levels even when the lower levels are too full to accept the excited electrons when they fall Exciting excitons Kim s polariton laser however pairs electrons with so called holes to form another type of particle an exciton A hole is a gap where an electron could exist in a structure and is treated by physicists as a real separate particle These excitons are bosons and an unlimited number of them can inhabit any given energy level Using bosons in lasers has been a scientific goal for decades but Yamamoto s team is the first to successfully

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/first-boson-laser-could-save-power/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 'Swiss Army knife' helps turn algae into biofuel - Futurity
    University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Atomically thin sheets share pucker trait Mammoth found on Michigan farm was likely butchered Genome reveals why coffee is so awesome Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Scientists have built a protein that streamlines the process of making biofuel from algae The multifunctional protein we ve built can be compared to a Swiss Army knife says Raul Gonzalez Esquer From known existing parts we ve built a new protein that does several essential functions Credit Christian Kitazume Flickr Swiss Army knife helps turn algae into biofuel Michigan State University right Original Study Posted by Layne Cameron Michigan State on September 22 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Scientists have figured out a way to streamline the molecular machinery that turns cyanobacteria also known as blue green algae into biofuels They fabricated a synthetic protein that not only improves the assembly of the carbon fixing factory of cyanobacteria but also provides a proof of concept for a device that might improve plant photosynthesis The multifunctional protein we ve built can be compared to a Swiss Army knife says Raul Gonzalez Esquer a doctoral researcher at Michigan State University From known existing parts we ve built a new protein that does several essential functions Why biofuel should eat wastewater Gonzalez Esquer worked with Cheryl Kerfeld professor of structural bioengineering who studies bacterial microcompartments BMCs to build the protein BMCs are self assembling cellular organs that perform myriad metabolic functions and in a sense are molecular factories with many different pieces of machinery The scientists modernized the factory by updating the carboxysome a particularly complex BMC that requires a series of interactions involving at least six gene products The result is a metabolic core that takes CO2 out of the atmosphere and converts it into sugar To streamline the process the scientists created a hybrid protein in cyanobacteria organisms that have many potential uses for making green chemicals or biofuels The new protein described in the current issue of Plant Cell replaces four gene products yet still supports photosynthesis Reducing the number of genes needed to build carboxysomes should facilitate the transfer of carboxysomes into plants The installation should help plants ability to fix carbon dioxide Improving their capacity to remove CO2 from the atmosphere

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/swiss-army-knife-biofuel-1009542/ (2016-02-12)
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