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  • Bird robot sticks landing to perch on palm - Futurity
    Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Formula for pi turns up in quantum mechanics Will self driving cars make us queasy Webcam shows why birds sing Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Bird robot sticks landing to perch on palm University of Illinois Posted by Rick Kubetz Illinois on May 8 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U ILLINOIS US Researchers have duplicated the control functions that let birds successfully perform a soft landing in this case perching on a human hand We believe we have the first demonstration of autonomous robotic flight of a bird like micro aerial vehicle MAV perching on a human hand states Soon Jo Chung an assistant professor in the aerospace engineering department at the University of Illinois httpv www youtube com watch v 2QqTcQ1BxIs Because the wings of ornithopters birds or aircraft with flapping wings are inherently capable of being reoriented this capability can be used for controlling and maneuvering the aircraft in a gliding phase thereby eliminating the need for additional traditional actuators Gliding is an effective way to conserve energy while soaring descending and landing The driving philosophy behind the work is that the maneuverability and control efficiency of avian flight can be replicated by applying their actuation and control principles to advanced MAVs designed on the size scale of small birds explains Aditya Paranjape a postdoctoral scholar working on this project We have developed an articulated wing based concept for an agile robotic aircraft inspired by birds Paranjape adds Of all maneuvers executed by flapping wing aircraft in a gliding phase a perched landing is arguably the most challenging Birds routinely use perching to land on objects such as tree branches power wires or building ledges According to the researchers there are two factors that make perching challenging to engineer the maneuver s duration is very short on the same order as the aircraft dynamics and the high level of position accuracy is required for a successful perched landing Our aerial robot concept lacks a vertical tail for improved agility similar to birds which renders it dynamically unstable and exacerbates both of these factors Paranjape says We choose a perching maneuver to demonstrate the capabilities of

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/bird-robot-sticks-landing-to-perch-on-palm/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Experts raise doubts about California's solar rebates - Futurity
    VU on April 13 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Since 2007 California has had one of the most aggressive incentive programs in the country for putting solar electric panels on the rooftops of homes and businesses Its 2 2 billion California Solar Initiative CSI has provided a per watt rebate for installing residential and commercial photovoltaic systems During this period the solar industry in the state has experienced double digit growth and to date has installed more than 245 000 systems capable of producing 2 365 megawatts of electricity As a result CSI has been widely touted as a major success However in a new study computer scientists carefully crunched the numbers and the results suggests rebates are not the most effective approach Instead they recommend a program to provide systems to low income households at little or no cost would have done more to stimulate the adoption of rooftop solar systems The problem with assessing the success of programs like CSI is that you need to compare them with what would have happened in the same world without the incentives says Yevgeniy Vorobeychik a computer science professor at Vanderbilt University Of course that is impossible so you need to use techniques like our data driven agent based modeling methodology that analyze the data and make predictions on how it would behave under different circumstances Vorobeychik and colleagues used CSI data on rooftop solar installations from May 2007 to April 2013 in San Diego County for their analysis This included detailed information on 8 500 projects including system size reported cost incentive amount whether system was purchased or leased installation date location and acreage of the lot and size of the home Modest adoption rates Based on data from May 2007 to April 2011 the analysts used methods developed in the field of machine learning to create a model of the relative importance that two factors economic benefit and peer influence play on an individual s decision to install a rooftop solar system In this case they used the number of existing installations in an area as the measure of peer influence Then they tested the accuracy of their model by predicting the pattern of adoption from May 2011 to April 2013 To test the effectiveness of financial subsidies on the market the researchers looked at a range of incentives from zero to eight times the actual the level They were surprised to find very little difference in adoption rates between no subsidy and the actual subsidy Increasing the subsidy rate did increase the number of adoptees but even at the highest level the effect was extremely modest Despite the fact that policymakers have paid overwhelming attention to increasing the economic benefits by reducing costs to get people to adopt solar technology our analysis indicates that this has much less effect than generally perceived says Vorobeychik That is what the data is telling us Buying vs leasing One of the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/california-solar-initiative-896542/ (2016-02-12)
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  • To stay in familiar waters, fish keep moving - Futurity
    compiled 43 years of data related to the movement of 128 million animals from 360 species living around North America including commercial staples such as lobster shrimp and cod They found that 70 percent of shifts in animals depth and 74 percent of changes in latitude correlated with regional scale fluctuations in ocean temperature If we follow the temperature which is easier to predict that provides a method to predict where the species will be too says first author Malin Pinsky a former Princeton postdoctoral researcher in ecology and evolutionary biology who is now an assistant professor of ecology and evolution at Rutgers University Climate changes at different rates and in different directions in different places he says Animals are basically being exposed to different changes in temperature The researchers compiled survey data collected from 1968 to 2011 by American and Canadian fishery research centers and government panels The surveys recorded surface and bottom temperatures as well as the complete mass of animals in nine areas central to North American fisheries the Aleutian Islands the eastern Bering Sea the Gulf of Alaska the West Coast from Washington to California the Gulf Coast from Louisiana to Mexico the Northeast coast from North Carolina to Maine the coast of Nova Scotia the southern Gulf of St Lawrence and the Atlantic Ocean east of Newfoundland Details of the surveys revealed that sea creatures adhere to a complex mosaic of local climate velocities the researchers reported On average changes in temperature for North America moved north a mere 4 5 miles per decade but in parts of Newfoundland that pace was a speedier 38 miles north per decade In areas off the US West Coast temperatures shifted south at 30 miles per decade while in the Gulf of Mexico velocities varied from 19 miles south to 11 miles north per decade Animal movements were just as motley As a whole species shifted an average of 5 miles north per decade but 45 percent of animal specific populations swam south Cod off Newfoundland moved 37 miles north per decade while lobster in the northeastern United States went the same direction at 43 miles per decade On the other hand pink shrimp a staple of Gulf Coast fisheries migrated south 41 miles per decade the researchers found Finely detailed movement Daniel Pauly a professor of fisheries at the University of British Columbia says that the researchers reveal finer details of marine movements that are crucial for preservation and commercial fishing yet often get lost in the global scale models typically used to predict how fish will respond to altered environs Pauly is familiar with the Princeton research but had no role in it Regional factors such as wind can actually counteract warmer water and result in cooler seas as is the case off the coasts of California and Peru Pauly says In addition fish are extremely sensitive to even slight temperature changes and will quickly seek ideal locales which can appear like erratic shifts in distribution

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/stay-familiar-waters-marine-life-move/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Steve Hinnefeld-Indiana, Author at Futurity
    Western Reserve University Columbia University Cornell University Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Steve Hinnefeld Indiana Indiana University Hormones for cattle stick around in streams Growth promoting hormones given to cattle may linger in the environment at higher concentrations and for longer durations than previously thought READ MORE Indiana University Skeleton turns snake evolution on its head The evolution of the snake s elongated legless body appears to be the exact opposite of what scientists have long assumed READ MORE Indiana University Link between Neanderthals and humans is still missing A new Indiana University study of dental fossils finds none fit the expected profile of an ancestor of both Neanderthals and modern humans READ MORE Indiana University Higher temps push turtles away from home turf Turtles struggling to keep up with rising temperatures are being forced to widen their geographic range but new real estate may Read More Indiana University Rock gas fuels eternal flame behind waterfall INDIANA U US Natural gas in underground rock layers can seep to the surface sometimes in quantities abundant enough to Read More Indiana University Totally unexpected switch may suppress tumors INDIANA U US Scientists have found a way to change the structure of a protein so it can enter Read More Indiana University Even in remote spots chemicals lurk in trees INDIANA U US Scientists have found that flame retardant chemicals show up as environmental pollutants all over the world Read More Indiana University US consumers aren t sold on plug in cars INDIANA U US The Obama administration s goal of putting a million plug in electric vehicles on the roads by 2015 Read More Indiana University New clues to Darwin s abominable mystery INDIANA U US Scientists offer a more detailed explanation for the sudden appearance and rapid spread of flowering plants Read More Indiana University Snakes struggle to keep pace with climate INDIANA U

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/indiana-hinnefeld/ (2016-02-12)
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  • One plant yields 3 clues to biofuel crops - Futurity
    googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print One plant yields 3 clues to biofuel crops Iowa State University right Original Study Posted by Mike Krapfl Iowa State on May 14 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license IOWA STATE US Knowing the function of three plant proteins could help scientists raise seed oil yield in crops a potential windfall for the bioeconomy The analysis of gene activity by researchers at Iowa State University and determination of protein structures by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences independently identified three related proteins that appear to be involved in fatty acid metabolism The researchers used thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana as the model plant The research groups then joined forces to test this hypothesis demonstrating a role of these proteins in regulating the amounts and types of fatty acids accumulated in plants The researchers also showed that the action of the proteins is very sensitive to temperature and that this feature may play an important role in how plants mitigate temperature stress using fatty acids The discovery is published online in the journal Nature This work has major implications for modulating the fatty acid profiles in plants which is terribly important not only to sustainable food production and nutrition but now also to biorenewable chemicals and fuels says corresponding author Joseph Noel a professor and director of the Jack H Skirball Center for Chemical Biology and Proteomics at the Salk Institute and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Because very high energy molecules such as fatty acids are created in the plant using the energy of the sun these types of molecules may ultimately provide the most cost effective and efficient sources for biorenewable products adds Iowa State genetic professor Eve Syrkin Wurtele also a corresponding author of the study Although the researchers now understand that the three proteins dubbed fatty acid binding proteins one two and three or FAP1 FAP2 and FAP3 are involved in fatty acid accumulation in plant tissues such as leaves and seeds Wurtele says researchers still don t understand the physical mechanism these proteins employ at the molecular level That knowledge will ultimately allow the two collaborating research groups to predictably engineer better functions in plants To identify the proteins function in plants Wurtele s research group used its expertise in molecular biology and bioinformatics the application of computer technologies to biological studies One tool the Iowa State researchers used was MetaOmGraph software they developed to analyze large sets of public data about the patterns of gene activity under different developmental environmental and genetic changes The software revealed that the expression patterns of the FAP genes resemble those of genes encoding enzymes of fatty acid synthesis The analyses also showed that the accumulation of two of the proteins is highest in the regions of the plant where the greatest amount of oil is produced These clues led the researchers to predict that

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/one-plant-yields-3-clues-to-biofuel-crops/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Credit unions have clout with farmers - Futurity
    Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Efforts to stop western wildfires misplaced Coral growth bands reflect Pacific s climate swings Climate s impact will move from Arctic to tropics Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Credit unions have clout with farmers Stanford University Posted by Stanford on June 6 2011 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license STANFORD US Because of their considerable influence among farmers in developing countries credit unions should be included in efforts to improve agricultural sustainability Most people tend to think that technology information flows to farmers through a direct pipeline from scientists but that isn t true says lead author Ellen McCullough a former research fellow at Stanford University now at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation To better understand how farmers decide to adopt new technologies researchers interviewed growers farm credit unions and agricultural experts in the Yaqui Valley in Sonora Mexico the birthplace of the green revolution in wheat and one of Mexico s most productive breadbaskets Matson has been working in the Yaqui Valley for nearly 20 years to determine how science can inform agricultural policy in an area grappling with the kinds of environmental challenges that plague other intensive farming regions While Yaqui Valley supplies most of Mexico s wheat the environmental costs are high Valley farms pollute local drinking water wreck coastal ecosystems and foul the air with particulates that cause a variety of diseases If scientists want to offer solutions to manage these environmental impacts they need to understand what influences farmers decisions about technology and production strategies McCullough says The study co authored by Pamela Matson professor of environmental studies at Stanford is published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences In Yaqui Valley credit unions hold sway among the majority of farmers In addition to providing loans crop insurance fertilizer and seed credit unions have taken over the government s role in providing technical expertise and management advice Valley growers also have

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/credit-unions-have-clout-with-farmers/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Rising food prices harm nutrition - Futurity
    University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Estimated costs of ER care too low Heroin painkiller addictions go hand in hand Pregnant smokers get subpar help to quit Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Rising food prices harm nutrition Washington University in St Louis Posted by Jessica Martin WUSTL on April 26 2011 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license WASHINGTON U ST LOUIS US The rising cost of food especially fruits and vegetables has a critical impact on nutrition intake especially in but not excluded to emerging countries Coupled with the financial crisis high food prices can take a significant toll on nutrition especially in developing countries says Lora Iannotti public health expert and professor

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/rising-food-prices-harm-nutrition/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Absent breast milk protein may signal cancer - Futurity
    of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Are those tiny gold particles bad for you Spread of HIV spikes in times before war Cystic fibrosis bacteria fight MRSA Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Absent breast milk protein may signal cancer Princeton University University at Buffalo right Original Study Posted by Ellen Goldbaum Buffalo on October 25 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U BUFFALO PRINCETON US A protein necessary for lactation inhibits the critical cellular transition that is an early indicator of breast cancer and its spread new research shows This is the first confirmed report that this protein called Elf5 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer explains Satrajit Sinha associate professor of biochemistry in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and a corresponding author on the paper with Yibin Kang in the department of molecular biology at Princeton University The researchers say the findings provide new avenues to pursue in treating and diagnosing breast cancer and possibly cancers of other organs as well The paper published in Nature Cell Biology includes findings from both animal and human breast cancer models Under normal circumstances Elf5 is a transcription factor that controls the genes that allow for milk production But when the researchers used knockout mice in whom Elf5 was removed they found more than just an inability to produce milk They found that epithelial cells in the mammary glands also became more mesenchymal that is more like stem cells an early harbinger of cancer Sinha says We found that when Elf5 levels are low or absent epithelial cells become more like stem cells morphing into mesenchymal cells changing their shape and appearance and migrating elsewhere in the body says Sinha This is how cancer spreads Elf5 keeps normal breast cells in their current shape and restricts their movement says lead author Rumela Chakrabarti who was previously a postdoctoral researcher in Sinha s lab and now works in the lab of Yibin Kang a molecular biology professor at Princeton She found that the protein accomplishes this by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition by directly repressing transcription of Snail2 a master regulator of mammary stem cells known to trigger the EMT Elf5 keeps Snail2 repressed but once Elf5 is lost then there is nothing to repress Snail 2 she explains Earlier diagnosis The paper notes that Elf5

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/absent-breast-milk-protein-may-signal-cancer/ (2016-02-12)
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