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  • Nanotubes can harm beneficial soil microbes - Futurity
    Columbia University Cornell University Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Erratic ice sheet raising sea levels Why volcanic ash ends up in the jet stream Will gravity offset Antarctic s melting ice sheet Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Nanotubes can harm beneficial soil microbes Purdue University right Original Study Posted by Brian Wallheimer Purdue on January 25 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license PURDUE US Some carbon nanotubes used for strengthening plastics may have an adverse effect on soil microbiology Specifically these raw non functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes were shown to damage the active microbes in low organic soil Ron Turco a professor of agronomy at Purdue University says many of the bacteria affected could be involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling which are critical processes to ensure a fully functional soil There appears to be more negative potential on the active microbial population than we thought says Turco whose findings were published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology The as produced materials could be a negative environmental situation if they are released into low organic soils that could not absorb them Functionalized carbon nanotubes have modifications that create chemical or biological changes to the nanotubes They re often used in medicines and Turco s research showed they had no effect in high organic or low organic soils Non functionalized single walled nanotubes those lacking intentional surface alterations are being added to a variety of products during manufacturing because they can strengthen the material without adding much weight Nanotubes contained in manufacturing waste products may find their way into wastewater treatment plants and bio solids that result from water purification Those bio solids cannot be released into water so they are often discarded by spreading on land adding

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/nanotubes-can-harm-beneficial-soil-microbes/ (2016-02-12)
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  • U.S. forests are crawling with 'yummy' salamanders - Futurity
    Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Satellites find spots where sharks may be overfished Pacific Ocean is an early warning of what s to come Birds fly the coop when climate shifts Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print We found that 1 88 billion salamanders inhabit one district of the Mark Twain National Forest alone which is roughly 1 400 metric tons of biomass For comparison that s equivalent to the biomass found in most whitetail deer in that region says Ray Semlitsch Credit Marshal Hedin Flickr U S forests are crawling with yummy salamanders right Original Study Posted by Jeff Sossamon U Missouri on November 19 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Salamander populations are much larger in some US forests than scientists once thought That s really good news for vertebrates which rely on the amphibians as a major source of food Researchers at the University of Missouri have estimated that the population of salamanders in forested regions of the Missouri Ozarks are 2 4 times higher than originally thought and in other regions of the eastern US may be on average 10 times higher A Southern Redback Salamander in the Ozark Highlands in Missouri Credit Katie O Donnell Our lab works to identify salamanders as an influential part of the forest ecosystem and food chain says Ray Semlitsch a professor of biological sciences Using the latest research methods we calculated the population size of Southern Redback Salamanders in Ozark Forests and their value as a food source We found that 1 88 billion salamanders inhabit one district of the Mark Twain National Forest alone which is roughly 1 400 metric tons of biomass For comparison that s equivalent to the biomass found in most whitetail deer in that region Related Articles On Futurity Tulane University Tree killing hurricanes worsen global warming University of Washington Rare nautilus seen for first time in 30 years Penn State Lone wolves more likely to die of mange There are two methods for estimating abundance One is to simply count salamanders and plot the numbers on a grid

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/forests-salamanders-food-804992/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Salmon boom and bust in extra-long cycles - Futurity
    Sound waters bubble up from turbulent canyon How to debug solar panel design Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Salmon boom and bust in extra long cycles McGill University University of Washington right Original Study Posted by Sandra Hines UW on January 22 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U WASHINGTON US Scientists have known that salmon runs vary by year and by decade but new research reveals huge cycles in stocks that last up to 200 years On the smaller scale there are 30 year to 80 year booms and busts in salmon runs in Alaska and on the West Coast that are driven by the climate pattern known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation The new research shows that those decadal cycles may overlay even more important centuries long conditions or regimes that influence fish productivity The layers in this sediment core will be analyzed for the isotopic signature of nitrogen that salmon accumulate in the ocean and leave behind in lake sediments when they die When there s a lot of such nitrogen it means returning runs during that time period were abundant View larger Credit Lauren Rogers U Washington The researchers found cycles lasting up to 200 years while examining 500 year records of salmon abundance in Southwest Alaska Natural variations in the abundance of spawning salmon are as large as those due to human harvest We ve been able to reconstruct what salmon runs looked like before the start of commercial fishing But rather than finding a flat baseline some sort of long term average run size we ve found that salmon runs fluctuated hugely even before commercial fishing started says Lauren Rogers who did this work while earning her doctorate in aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington and is now a post doctoral researcher with the University of Oslo Norway That these strong or weak periods could persist for sometimes hundreds of years means we need to reconsider what we think of as normal for salmon stocks she says Surprisingly salmon populations in the same regions do not all show the same changes through time It is clear that the salmon returning to different rivers march to the beat of a different slow drummer says Daniel Schindler professor of aquatic and fishery sciences and co author of the paper which appears in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The implications for management are profound Schindler says While it is convenient to assume that ecosystems have a constant static capacity for producing fish or any natural resource our data demonstrate clearly that capacity is anything but stationary Thus management must be ready to reduce harvesting when ecosystems become unexpectedly less productive and allow increased harvesting when ecosystems shift to more productive regimes Management should also allow and probably even encourage fishers to move among rivers to

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/salmon-boom-and-bust-in-extra-long-cycles/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Glynis Smalley-Monash, Author at Futurity
    Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Glynis Smalley Monash Monash University A new Aceh emerges 10 years after tsunami Most people in Aceh who survived a devastating tsunami in 2004 says conditions are better than they had been before the disaster READ MORE Monash University To fix human health focus on ecosystems Thinking of humans as separate from ecosystems is making us sick according to a new study citing antibiotic resistance and obesity as examples READ MORE Monash University Why climate debates get people so angry Antagonizing climate change skeptics won t change how they see the issue say researchers READ MORE Monash University Dash of turmeric with breakfast improves memory People in the early stages of diabetes may want to spice up their breakfast with a little turmeric READ MORE Monash University Just a little bit of dairy may cut your risk of stroke One serving of dairy every day may be enough to ward off heart disease or stroke even in communities where dairy is not a traditional part of the diet READ MORE Monash University Detector could vastly improve night vision goggles Researchers have developed a light detector that could revolutionize chemical sensing equipment and night vision technology READ MORE Monash University Scientists are a step closer to making blood cells on demand By watching how zebrafish embryos develop scientists are starting to unravel the mystery of how the human body produces blood stem cells READ MORE Monash University Wormy pills might fend off autoimmune diseases Scientists have identified peptides from parasitic hookworms that can calm the body s immune response READ MORE Monash University University of York Higher soda tax may help consumers tighten their belt A soft drink tax might be an effective way to combat obesity generating an annual weight losses of up to 3 64 kilograms or eight pounds experts predict READ MORE Monash University Healthy eaters are big consumers of medical care The idea that a

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/monash-smalley/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Cost of chemo can be 43 times higher for uninsured - Futurity
    University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Better births after a few parenting classes Mouse model opens window into Parkinson s Could brown fat help control diabetes Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Patients with Medicare and private insurance don t pay the sticker price of health care says Stacie Dusetzina They pay a discounted rate However uninsured patients don t have the bargaining power or they may not try to negotiate for a better price Credit iStockphoto Cost of chemo can be 43 times higher for uninsured University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill right Original Study Posted by Thania Benios UNC on April 14 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Uninsured cancer patients are paying anywhere from two to 43 times what Medicare would pay for chemotherapy drugs A new study shows that Medicare recipients private insurance patients and the uninsured all pay different prices for the same treatment Researchers reviewed newly available Medicare data on what physicians charged for chemotherapy drugs delivered intravenously in 2012 Uninsured patients who did not negotiate the billed amounts could expect to pay 6 711 for an infusion of the colorectal cancer drug oxaliplatin In contrast patients with Medicare and private health plans only pay 3 090 and 3 616 for the same drug respectively Paying full cost Although uninsured cancer patients paid on average two times more than Medicare paid for expensive chemotherapy drugs very high payment differences were seen for drugs that were quite inexpensive on Medicare For example carboplatin was estimated at 26 for one infusion with Medicare but the estimate for uninsured patients was 1 124 The work published in the journal Health Affairs comes at a time when transparency in health care costs and the cost of specialty drugs has never been greater The key issue is that millions of no and low income earners are paying full cost for prescription drugs without financially viable options for coverage or federal subsidies No bargaining power Patients with Medicare and private insurance don t pay the sticker price of health care says Stacie Dusetzina assistant professor in the Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill They pay a discounted rate However uninsured patients don t have the bargaining power or they may not try to negotiate for a better price In addition to estimating costs for infused

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/chemotherapy-insurance-health-care-costs-897122/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Do global college rankings harm students? - Futurity
    Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Website brings Middle East close to home How transgender policy sets off gender panic Getting engaged turns tweets from I to we Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Do global college rankings harm students Michigan State University right Original Study Posted by Andy Henion Michigan State on August 19 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license MICHIGAN STATE US A new study suggests higher education ranking systems could be creating competition just for the sake of it and at a time when universities are struggling financially Global rankings that emphasize science and technology research such as the Academic Rankings of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University have become increasingly popular and influential during the past decade says Brendan Cantwell lead author and assistant professor of educational administration at Michigan State University As a result researchers have begun to examine whether the rankings are creating increased inequality between and within universities Cantwell s study suggests higher education policies to achieve world class status are channeling more state and federal money to a select group of large research universities and away from efforts such as President s Obama s college completion agenda that aim to make a college degree achievable for all Americans Both of those policy agendas are occurring simultaneously the push to have top notch universities and a system of open access that allows students from all backgrounds to get an education Cantwell says I m not saying those are incompatible but you have finite resources and how you choose to allocate those resources affects one or the other of those goals The trend of universities competing for elite status on global ranking systems has become deeply entrenched in the United States and is now occurring worldwide including in China Germany Netherlands

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/do-global-college-rankings-harm-students/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Low wages cost taxpayers $153 billion a year - Futurity
    University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Society and Culture Related Articles Strong loonie sends Canadian shoppers across the border God s beliefs mirror our own Got milk Humans did 5 000 years ago Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print When companies pay too little for workers to provide for their families workers rely on public assistance programs to meet their basic needs says Ken Jacobs Credit evelynishere Flickr Low wages cost taxpayers 153 billion a year University of California Berkeley right Original Study Posted by UC Berkeley on April 16 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Persistent low wages cost US taxpayers approximately 153 billion every year in public support to working families according to a new report that details for the first time the state by state costs Following decades of wage cuts and health benefits rollbacks more than half of all state and federal spending on public assistance programs 56 percent now goes to working families researchers say When companies pay too little for workers to provide for their families workers rely on public assistance programs to meet their basic needs says Ken Jacobs chair of the Center for Labor Research and Education at University of California Berkeley and coauthor of the report This creates significant cost to the states Big spenders The report analyzed state spending for Medicaid Children s Health Insurance Program and Temporary Aid to Needy Families TANF and federal spending for those programs and food stamps SNAP and the Earned Income Tax Credit EITC The study also reports that On average 52 percent of state public assistance spending supports working families with costs as high as 3 7 billion in California 3 3 billion in New York and 2 billion in Texas Reliance on public assistance can be found among workers in a diverse range of occupations including frontline fast food workers 52 percent childcare workers 46 percent home care workers 48 percent and part time college faculty 25 percent From 2003 to 2013 wage growth remained flat or negative for the entire bottom 70 percent of workers in the United States Jacobs says Over the same time the share of non elderly

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/public-assistance-wages-taxpayers-899062/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Christmas trash gets a second chance - Futurity
    at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Database tracks 200 years of jellyfish Climate policy not change worries farmers most Fishing is still good near California s protected waters Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Christmas trash gets a second chance University of Warwick Posted by Peter Dunn Warwick on December 24 2010 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U WARWICK UK Most plastic packaging on gifts is almost impossible to recycle A new technique could process 100 percent of household plastics instead of the tiny fraction currently recycled Sorting household plastic and putting it into the recycling bin doesn t guarantee it won t end up in a landfill Typically only 12 percent of such waste is truly recycled Such materials are often simply too time consuming to separate and often objects are made of more than one plastic making the job even more challenging However University of Warwick engineers have come up with a simple process that can cope with every piece of plastic waste and can even break some polymers such as polystyrene back down to their original monomers styrene

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/give-christmas-trash-a-second-chance/ (2016-02-12)
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