archive-org.com » ORG » F » FUTURITY.ORG

Total: 1240

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Robotic ankle moves more like the real thing - Futurity
    of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Study confirms digestive trouble in kids with autism Carbon limits for power plants have healthy side effects Death rates for baby girls spike after typhoons Play Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The ankle is naturally capable of a complicated three dimensional motion but most rigid exoskeletons allow only a single pivot point says Yong Lae Park The new robotic device was designed using soft plastics and composite materials Credit Carnegie Mellon Robotic ankle moves more like the real thing Carnegie Mellon University right Original Study Posted by Byron Spice Carnegie Mellon on January 24 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Engineers have created a soft wearable device that mimics the natural movements of muscles tendons and ligaments of the lower leg They developed the active orthotic device using soft plastics and composite materials instead of a rigid exoskeleton The soft materials combined with pneumatic artificial muscles PAMs lightweight sensors and advanced control software made it possible for the robotic device to achieve natural motions in the ankle Related Articles On Futurity University of Pittsburgh Paralyzed man s mind moves prosthetic arm Stanford University Heart monitor in a bandage Stanford University Fake skin sends pressure signals to brain cells Yong Lae Park an assistant professor of robotics at Carnegie Mellon University Park did the work while a post doctoral researcher at Harvard s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering He says the same approach could be used to create rehabilitative devices for other joints of the body or even to create soft exoskeletons that increase the strength of the wearer The researchers describe the design in the journal Bioinspiration Biomimetics 3 D motion The robotic device would be suitable for aiding people with neuromuscular disorders of the foot and ankle associated with cerebral palsy amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multiple sclerosis or stroke These gait disorders include drop foot in which the forefoot drops because of weakness or paralysis and equinus in which the upward bending motion of the ankle is limited Conventional passive ankle braces can improve gait but long term use can lead to muscle atrophy because of disuse Active powered devices can improve function and also help re educate the neuromuscular system Park says But the limitation of a traditional exoskeleton is that it limits the natural degrees of freedom of the body he adds The ankle is naturally

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/bio-inspired-robotic-ankle-help-rehabilitation/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • How biting bugs use heat sensors to hunt prey - Futurity
    Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Material snags CO2 from natural gas Light skin mutation stems from one ancestor Quilted graphene is also super strong Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The more scientists understand about how insects respond to and sense heat the better they can understand insect migration in response to rising global temperatures and the spread of disease through insect bites Credit Brandeis University How biting bugs use heat sensors to hunt prey Brandeis University right Original Study Posted by Leah Burrows Brandeis on September 20 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license The discovery of a temperature sensor in fruit flies could help scientists understand how mosquitoes and other insects find warm blooded targets like humans This previously unknown molecular sensor belongs to a protein family responsible for sensing tastes and smells These types of sensors are present in disease spreading insects like mosquitoes and tsetse flies The discovery by researchers at Brandeis University is published in the journal Nature Better repellent Related Articles On Futurity Stanford University Earth s iron core is not rock solid University of Nottingham Time in space may stretch worm lifespan University of Texas at Austin Rare mix up results in hybrid butterfly Biting insects such as mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide and heat Notice how mosquitoes always seem to bite where there is the most blood That is because those areas are the warmest says Paul Garrity a professor of biology in the National Center for Behavioral Genomics at Brandeis who co authored the paper If you can find a mosquito s temperature receptor you can potentially produce a more effective repellent or trap Garrity says The discovery of this new temperature receptor in the fruit fly gives scientists an idea of where to look for similar receptors in the mosquito

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/biting-bugs-use-heat-sensors-hunt-prey/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Evolution is actually pretty predictable - Futurity
    be used to determine a predictable evolutionary pattern driven by outside factors Scientists could then pinpoint how the diversity of adaptations seen in the natural world developed even in distantly related animals The researchers carried out a survey of DNA sequences from 29 distantly related insect species the largest sample of organisms yet examined for a single evolutionary trait Fourteen of these species have evolved a nearly identical characteristic due to one external influence they feed on plants that produce cardenolides a class of steroid like cardiotoxins that are a natural defense for plants such as milkweed and dogbane Though separated by 300 million years of evolution these diverse insects which include beetles butterflies and aphids experienced changes to a key protein called sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase or the sodium potassium pump which regulates a cell s crucial sodium to potassium ratio The protein in these insects eventually evolved a resistance to cardenolides which usually cripple the protein s ability to pump potassium into cells and excess sodium out Jianzhi Zhang a University of Michigan professor of ecology and evolutionary biology says that the new study shows that certain traits have a limited number of molecular mechanisms and that numerous distinct species can share the few mechanisms there are As a result it is likely that a cross section of certain organisms can provide insight into the development of other creatures he says The finding of parallel evolution in not two but numerous herbivorous insects increases the significance of the study because such frequent parallelism is extremely unlikely to have happened simply by chance continues Zhang who is familiar with the study but had no role in it It shows that a common molecular mechanism is used by many different insects to defend themselves against the toxins in their food suggesting that perhaps the number of potential mechanisms for achieving this goal is very limited he explains That many different insects independently evolved the same molecular tricks to defend themselves against the same toxin suggests that studying a small number of well chosen model organisms can teach us a lot about other species Yes evolution is predictable to a certain degree 33 mutations Andolfatto and his co authors examined the sodium potassium pump protein because of its well known sensitivity to cardenolides In order to function properly in a wide variety of physiological contexts cells must be able to control levels of potassium and sodium Situated on the cell membrane the protein generates a desired potassium to sodium ratio by pumping three sodium atoms out of the cell for every two potassium atoms it brings in Cardenolides disrupt the exchange of potassium and sodium essentially shutting down the protein says Andolfatto an assistant professor in Princeton s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics The human genome contains four copies of the pump protein and it is a candidate gene for a number of human genetic disorders including salt sensitive hypertension and migraines

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/evolution-is-actually-pretty-predictable/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RNA sets the ‘rhythm’ for protein folding - Futurity
    sized ankles hint first primates lived in trees Bigger brain for those who self reflect Crystal structure could push the limits of solar cells Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print RNA sets the rhythm for protein folding Stanford University right Original Study Posted by Max McClure Stanford on January 31 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license STANFORD US Music doesn t go along at a single mechanical speed Notes of various lengths mix to create a specific complex rhythm New research suggests protein synthesis works the same way The sequence of events is elegant proteins are assembled when ribosomes match mRNA sequences up with specific tRNA molecules Those tRNAs carry specific amino acids that link together in a chain to form a specific protein But multiple RNA sequences can encode the same amino acid some that are translated quickly and some slowly Although they all result in proteins with identical composition the choice of mRNA sequence can dramatically change the rate at which the protein is made Research from Stanford University biology Professor Judith Frydman and researcher Sebastian Pechmann now reveals that this protein synthesis rhythm may be evolutionarily adjusted to control the folding of the new protein chain as it emerges from the ribosome The finding may explain how RNA sequences define the final folded form of a protein a fundamental problem in molecular biology since proteins need to fold in order to function For around 50 years there has been a conceptual gap between the sequence and the final structure says Pechmann a postdoctoral scholar in the Frydman Lab There s been the sense that there s much more information in the sequence than can be deciphered at the moment Setting a tune Published online in advance of print in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology the paper analyzes 10 closely related yeast species as a model Both fast optimal and slow non optimal codons are evolutionarily conserved consistently appearing in particular parts of the mRNA transcript where they appear to strategically slow down or speed up translation What they are doing is setting a tune for protein folding says Frydman The tRNA molecules are cloverleaf shaped twists of RNA that float freely in the cell until called into action by a ribosome The stem of the clover is linked to an amino acid while the leaf s middle lobe recognizes the three nucleotide mRNA sequence or codon that corresponds to that amino acid This genetic code is partially redundant Some amino acids are encoded by as many as six different codons But these sequences while specifying the same amino acid aren t all equally available Almost all amino acids can be specified by either a fast available tRNA molecule or a slow rare one giving the cell the option of using RNA sequence to regulate translation speed An idea has been around for years that

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/rna-sets-the-%e2%80%98rhythm%e2%80%99-for-protein-folding/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Teeth alter date of grassy diet for pre-humans - Futurity
    Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles For identification lend me your ears Last meals show birds used to be less diverse Ultracold atoms heat up quantum research Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Above a fragment of a hominin tooth from Woranso Mille Afar Ethiopia one of 152 tooth fragments sampled for isotope analysis to find evidence of diet change Credit Yohannes Haile Selassie Cleveland Museum of Natural History Teeth alter date of grassy diet for pre humans Johns Hopkins University right Original Study Posted by Arthur Hirsch Johns Hopkins on September 16 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Fossilized teeth suggest that our primate ancestors began adding grass based food to their diets about 400 000 years earlier than experts once thought The finding means early hominins took this important step one of several in that approximate time period toward becoming Homo sapiens 3 8 million years ago The shift in eating habits would have broadened our ancestors horizons and improved their species capacity for survival says geologist Naomi Levin of Johns Hopkins University who led the research She and colleagues describe the work online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Leaving the trees You can then range wider Levin says of the hominins broadening of their diets to include grasses and their roots and also insects or animals that ate grass You can be in more places more resilient to habitat change and thus more likely to survive she says Previously hominin diets focused on foods from trees and shrubs At roughly the same time as the dietary change during the Pliocene era 2 6 million to 5 3 million years ago human precursors were starting to come down out of the trees and travel on two feet on the ground A refined sense for when the dietary changes took place among early humans in relation to changes in our ability to be bipedal and terrestrial will help us understand our evolutionary story says Levin an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences Hominin jaw from Ethiopia dates back 2 8 million years This research reveals surprising insights into the interactions between morphology and behavior among Pliocene primates says coauthor Yohannes Haile Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History The results not only show an earlier

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/hominin-teeth-grass-1004422-2/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cheaper membrane filters natural gas and oil - Futurity
    Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Vibrating glove could teach you Braille Pull very fast and graphene paper gets brittle Your brain tissue changes when you learn to navigate Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print You need hydrogen in order to sweeten crudes says Benjamin A Wilhite We can use our membrane right now as a hydrogen purifier which is valuable because hydrogen is extremely useful in the refining industry Credit oil derricks via Shutterstock Cheaper membrane filters natural gas and oil Texas A M University right Original Study Posted by Timothy Schnettler Texas A M on May 14 2014 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Engineers have developed a new gas separation membrane that could make extracting impurities from oil and natural gases easier and less expensive Jaime C Grunlan and Benjamin A Wilhite of Texas A M University report the findings in Advanced Materials They have also filed a patent for this technology due to its commercial potential We use a simple polymer based film to remove the impurities and it has the promise of a less expensive method for producing purer oil says Wilhite associate professor in the department of chemical engineering It is all polymer and we are able to get performances comparable to really expensive materials such as mixed matrix membranes and zeolites The technology is separating gases adds Grunlan associate professor in the mechanical engineering department Gas where they mine it is impure and contains different poison gases you don t want If you run gas through this membrane what comes out is much purer than what went in on the other side Related Articles On Futurity University at Buffalo Rainbow polymer reveals true colors Penn State Edible film can kill pathogens on meat Iowa State University Is Saudi Arabia s oil water loop a warning The membrane that Grunlan and Wilhite have developed is a layer by layer polymer coating that is comprised of alternating individual layers of common low cost polyelectrolytes The coating can be made by dipping or spraying making it very easy to apply to existing gas separation systems These films separate molecules based on size the smaller ones such as hydrogen pass through while larger ones such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen are

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/gas-separation-membrane-oil-crude/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 'Bionic' limb moves like natural leg - Futurity
    University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Barcodes reveal insects hidden habits Smoke from fires fueled 2011 tornado outbreak To protect your phone this system learns how you tap Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Bionic limb moves like natural leg Vanderbilt University Posted by David Salisbury VU on August 18 2011 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license VANDERBILT U US A new prosthetic design is the first to include powered knee and ankle joints that move in unison making it much easier for an amputee to walk sit stand and climb It also allows amputees to walk without the leg dragging gait characteristic of conventional artificial legs The device designed by engineers at Vanderbilt University uses the latest advances in computer sensor electric motor and battery technology to give it bionic capabilities It comes equipped with sensors that monitor its user s motion and has microprocessors programmed to use this data to predict what the person is trying to do and operate the device in ways that facilitate these movements Mechanical engineer Michael Goldfarb right and amputee Craig Hutto who is testing out the new bionic leg developed at Vanderbilt University John Russell Vanderbilt When its working it s totally different from my current prosthetic says Craig Hutto the 23 year old amputee who has been testing the leg for several years A passive leg is always a step behind me The Vanderbilt leg is only a split second behind The bionic leg is the result of a seven year research effort directed by Michael Goldfarb a professor of mechanical engineering With out latest model we have validated our hypothesis that the right technology was available to make a lower limb prosthetic with powered knee and ankle joints says Goldfarb Our device illustrates the progress we are making at integrating man and machine The prosthesis is designed for daily life Studies have shown that users equipped with the device naturally walk 25 percent faster on level surfaces than when they use passive lower limb prosthetics That is because it takes users 30 to 40 percent less of their own energy to operate Going up and down slopes is one of the hardest things to do with a conventional leg says Hutto So I have to be conscious of where I go because I can get very tired walking up an down slopes But that won t be a problem with the powered

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/bionic-limb-moves-like-natural-leg/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Binary stars have a fatal attraction - Futurity
    Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles 500 million year old gene gets 2nd chance How to build a better giant atom trap Twinkle twinkle Early stars came in pairs Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Binary stars have a fatal attraction University of Texas at Austin Posted by Tim Green U Texas on July 15 2011 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U TEXAS AUSTIN US A pair of burnt out stars spiraling into one another at breakneck speeds will merge and possibly explode as a supernova in about 900 000 years The two white dwarfs orbiting each other in just 13 minutes and circling at 370 miles per second 180 times faster than the fastest jet on Earth will be used by scientists to test Einstein s theory of relativity and the origin of some peculiar supernovae These stars are whipping around each other so fast they are literally distorting the fabric of space says J J Hermes a graduate student working with Don Winget professor of astronomy at University of Texas Austin As J J and I watched the first data come in seeing the eclipses and light variations easily in the raw data we were elated Winget says The importance of this object was immediately clear to us This system will give us a chance to test the theory of general relativity in two ways by detecting the gravitational radiation from this system directly using space missions like LISA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and by measuring the rate of the decay of the orbital period as the two objects spiral together This research will be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters The brighter white dwarf contains about a quarter of the Sun s mass compacted into a Neptune sized ball while its companion has more than half the mass of the Sun and is Earth sized A penny made of this white dwarf s material would weigh about 1 000 pounds on Earth Their mutual gravitational pull is so strong that it deforms the lower mass star by three percent If the Earth bulged by the same amount there would be tides 120 miles

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/binary-stars-have-a-fatal-attraction/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •