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  • Could bacteria build better computers? - Futurity
    Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Science and Technology Related Articles Faces show fear and disgust to help eyes see To store more memories we forget the details Telescope snaps gamma ray bursts in orbit Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Could bacteria build better computers University of Leeds right Original Study Posted by Richard Mellor Leeds on May 8 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U LEEDS UK Bacteria that make magnets and wires may someday help build environmentally friendly computers with larger hard drives and faster connections Researchers at the University of Leeds have used a bacterium that eats iron to create a surface of magnets similar to those found in traditional hard drives and wiring As the bacterium ingests the iron it creates tiny magnets within itself In a process akin to potato printing but on a much smaller scale this protein is attached to a gold surface in a checkerboard pattern and placed in a solution containing iron Credit U Leeds The team has also begun to understand how the proteins inside these bacteria collect shape and position these nanomagnets inside their cells As reported in the journal Small the researchers can now replicate this behavior outside the bacteria Led by Sarah Staniland from the School of Physics and Astronomy in a longstanding collaboration with the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology the team hopes to develop a bottom up approach for creating cheaper more environmentally friendly electronics of the future We are quickly reaching the limits of traditional electronic manufacturing as computer components get smaller The machines we ve traditionally used to build them are clumsy at such small scales Nature has provided us with the perfect tool to circumvent this problem says Staniland The magnetic array was created by doctoral student Johanna Galloway who used a protein that creates perfect nanocrystals of magnetite inside the bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum In a process akin to potato printing but on a much smaller scale this protein is attached to a gold surface in a checkerboard pattern and placed in a solution containing iron At a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius similarly sized crystals of magnetite form on the sections of the surface covered by the protein The researchers are now working to reduce the size of these islands of magnets in order to make arrays of single nanomagnets They also plan to vary the magnetic materials that this protein can control These next steps would allow each of these nanomagnets to

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/could-bacteria-build-better-computers/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Low glucose 'delivery' may intensify Alzheimer's - Futurity
    of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Nose swabs confirm H1N1 flu in seals Personality can amp up tinnitus trouble Cocaine use causes feed forward loop Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print We do not know yet whether medicine can restore GLUT1 expression but we believe that targeting the protein may help prevent Alzheimer s from getting worse among individuals predisposed to develop the disease says Berislav Zlokovic Credit iStockphoto Low glucose delivery may intensify Alzheimer s University of Southern California right Original Study Posted by Alison Trinidad USC on March 3 2015 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license A deficiency in the protein that moves glucose across the brain s protective blood brain barrier appears to intensify the neurodegenerative effects of Alzheimer s disease The study done with mice suggests that targeting the protein called GLUT1 could help prevent or slow the effects of Alzheimer s especially among those at risk for the disease The study appears online in Nature Neuroscience Our results suggest that GLUT1 deficiencies at the blood brain barrier are not just symptoms of Alzheimer s but in fact lead to a series of vascular injuries that worsen the effects of the disease says Berislav Zlokovic director of the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute at USC s Keck School of Medicine chair for Alzheimer s disease research and the study s principal investigator We do not know yet whether medicine can restore GLUT1 expression but we believe that targeting the protein may help prevent Alzheimer s from getting worse among individuals predisposed to develop the disease Brain fuel According to the Alzheimer s Association roughly 5 2 million people of all ages in the United States have Alzheimer s a progressive brain disease that causes problems with memory thinking and behavior It is the most common type of dementia a general term for loss of memory and other mental abilities and is projected to affect 16 million Americans over age 65 by 2050 Glucose is the brain s main energy source and GLUT1 helps move it across the blood brain barrier a cellular layer that prevents entry of blood and pathogens into the brain Previous research has shown

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/glucose-brain-alzheimers-867292/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Why our parasitic genes aren't deadly - Futurity
    University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles Stereotypes about aging can make memory slump Potential MD treatment from tarantulas Would a 5 coupon help you stick to exercise Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Why our parasitic genes aren t deadly University of Nottingham right Original Study Posted by Emma Thorne Nottingham on June 21 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license U NOTTINGHAM UK Researchers have discovered why so called jumping genes found in most living organisms don t ultimately kill their hosts The study reveals for the first time how the movement and duplication of segments of DNA known as transposons is regulated This prevents a genomic meltdown and instead enables transposons to live in harmony with their hosts including humans In the 1940s Barbara McClintock discovered transposons and received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1983 Ancient relics of these jumping genes as they are sometimes called make up 50 percent of the DNA in humans They are characterized as jumping because they can change their position within the genome thereby creating or reversing mutations This process known as DNA transposition plays a critical role in creating genetic diversity and enabling species to adapt and evolve Transposons don t just jump from one location to another they usually leave behind a copy of themselves at their original location Left unchecked this would lead to an exponential increase in their numbers Exponential growth is always unsustainable and in the case of transposons they would quickly kill their host Because this doesn t happen clearly some form of regulation is taking place within the genome For a long time scientists have understood that an enzyme called transposase which is critical to the whole transposition process also apparently brings it under control How this actually occurs has however remained a mystery until now For the first time the new study carried out by researchers at The University of Nottingham The University of Cambridge and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Centre in Seattle successfully identified the mechanism through which DNA transposition is regulated Ronald Chalmers professor of molecular and cellular biology at the University of Nottingham says A successful parasite is not fatal to its host but lives in harmony with it It was while doing some biochemistry research that we stumbled upon the solution It was so simple that initially it was hard to appreciate the brilliance of it It was a

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/why-our-parasitic-genes-arent-deadly/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Can one gene predict a soldier's suicide risk? - Futurity
    alarmingly high says Naomi Sadeh assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University s School of Medicine MED and a psychologist at the National Center for PTSD But researchers still don t know which veterans will turn to suicide and why While risk rises for many reasons PTSD post traumatic stress disorder has emerged as one of the strongest predictors But not every veteran develops PTSD or becomes suicidal Sadeh says Our biggest challenge right now is predicting who is going to attempt suicide we re not really very good at that yet Could a blood test predict suicide risk A new study points to a biomarker that might bring researchers a little closer to the goal of better predicting and perhaps treating PTSD and suicide risk a gene called SKA2 Biomarkers short for biological markers are measurable indicators of health or disease things like blood cholesterol or antibody levels Many biomarkers don t provide a definitive diagnosis of disease but in conjunction with other health information can indicate risk and also possible avenues of treatment Scientists are actively searching for biomarkers that may indicate early signs of diseases like Alzheimer s Parkinson s lung cancer and in this case risk of suicide In the past we ve relied on self reporting to estimate suicide risk veterans telling us when they have depression or symptoms of PTSD says Sadeh The field is looking for more objective measurements and that s where biomarkers come in At first I was skeptical about trying to find a genetic association for anything as complicated as suicide risk because there are so many factors that go into it says Mark Miller associate professor of psychiatry and senior author on the study that is published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry But within the last few years researchers have made many advances in identifying molecular markers that may be linked to suicide SKA2in the spotlight SKA2 emerged as a possible biomarker for suicide risk in 2014 when researchers from Johns Hopkins University compared the brains of people who had died from suicide to those who died from other causes When screening the genomes of people who had died from suicide researchers looked for genes that were methylated tagged with a tiny molecule of one carbon and three hydrogen atoms known as a methyl group differently than in other genome samples Methylation is one of the primary ways that the body or the environment switches genes on and off Researchers found that in the brains of people who had died from suicide the SKA2 gene was methylated in a certain location and thereby switched off That study also found the same changes in SKA2 in the blood of live patients experiencing suicidal thoughts Though researchers still aren t sure exactly what role SKA2 plays in the body or why turning it off might increase risk for suicide studies have shown that it helps regulate the HPA axis a hormonal system that plays a role in our fight or flight

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/veterans-ptsd-suicide-1019022/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Cindy del Rosario-Tapan-Columbia, Author at Futurity
    University in St Louis Yale University University Boston University Brandeis University Brown University California Institute of Technology Cardiff University Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University Columbia University Cornell University Duke University Emory University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University McGill University Michigan State University Monash University National University of Singapore New York University Northwestern University Penn State Princeton University Purdue University Rice University Rutgers University Stanford University Stony Brook University Syracuse University Texas A M University Tulane University University at Buffalo University College London University of Arizona University of California at Irvine University of California Berkeley University of California Davis University of California Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Copenhagen University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University All Articles By Cindy del Rosario Tapan Columbia Columbia University Scientists find 18 new viruses on NYC rats The rats scurrying around New York City are carrying a number of pathogens that could be dangerous to humans READ MORE Columbia University In autism brain doesn t prune extra synapses The brains of children and adolescents with autism reveal a slowdown in how the brain typically trims away extra synapses READ MORE Columbia University Scientists make lung cells from human stem cells

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/author/cindy-del-rosario-tapan/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Gym benefits draw healthy seniors to Medicare - Futurity
    Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Health and Medicine Related Articles For at risk moms nurse visits save lives Overweight women get active when doctors intervene RNA catalogue reveals key to brown fat Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Gym benefits draw healthy seniors to Medicare Brown University right Original Study Posted by David Orenstein Brown on January 17 2012 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license BROWN US Medicare plans aren t allowed to exclude unhealthy and costly seniors but some plans get around the restriction by offering gym memberships to draw in healthier and more profitable members Offering a fitness membership does not mean that you are denying people coverage but you are changing your benefits to appeal selectively to people who are healthy says co author Amal Trivedi a public health professor at Brown University Policymakers intended for Medicare Advantage plans to compete on the basis of improving quality and reducing costs rather than on their ability to attract healthier patients What we found in the study is that offering coverage for fitness membership is a very effective strategy to attract a much healthier population The conclusion reported in the New England Journal of Medicine comes from Trivedi s and lead author Alicia Cooper s statistical comparisons among thousands of patients in 22 Medicare Advantage plans 11 case plans that added fitness club memberships in 2004 or 2005 and 11 similar control plans that didn t The researchers looked at when each plan member enrolled when plans started offering the benefit and what each plan member said about his or her health in the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey from 2006 to 2008 One analysis compared the self reported health of seniors who enrolled in case plans before the fitness club benefit was offered to the health of those who enrolled after the benefit was offered While 29 1 percent of the seniors who enrolled before the benefit was available described themselves to be in excellent or very good health 35 1 percent of the seniors who enrolled after it became available reported that level of health In the before group 56 1 percent reported some limitation to their physical activity but only 45 7 percent in the after group did Also a third of the before group reported difficulty walking compared to just a quarter in the after group Once the Medicare Advantage plans started covering health club

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/gym-benefits-draw-healthy-seniors-to-medicare/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Arsenic in well water runs deep in Vietnam - Futurity
    University of Florida University of Illinois University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Leeds University of Maryland University of Melbourne University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Queensland University of Rochester University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Toronto University of Virginia University of Warwick University of Washington University of York Vanderbilt University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Why volcanic ash ends up in the jet stream To feed the world oceans need more care Soot hits Arctic ice with double whammy Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print Arsenic in well water runs deep in Vietnam Stanford University right Original Study Posted by Dan Stober Stanford on August 12 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license STANFORD US An estimated 100 million people in South Asia have been exposed to groundwater contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic which is linked to cancer and other health risks Drilling deeper wells the dig deep strategy has become common in the search for clean water that is used for drinking agriculture and industry but new research shows that even deep wells might not be arsenic free Scientists reviewed 42 000 well measurements taken throughout the multi aquifer system of Vietnam s Mekong Delta the southern tip of Vietnam and the specific area of study In an area spanning more than 1 000 square kilometers 386 square miles arsenic was found in nearly 900 deep wells Laura Erban lead author of the study on arsenic in groundwater in Vietnam samples a well in the Mekong Delta Credit Stanford Historically deep wells often tested arsenic free says Laura Erban a doctoral student in environmental Earth system science at Stanford University and the lead author of the study However contaminated deep wells are being reported more often in parts of West Bengal Bangladesh and the Red River Delta in northern Vietnam In some cases the wells were contaminated when deep pumping projects inadvertently transported shallow arsenic or other substances that help mobilize arsenic to greater depths But in the Mekong Delta it appears there s an entirely different and previously unsuspected process contaminating deep wells As reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences when water is heavily pumped from an aquifer surrounding clay layers compact and water is expelled as the land sinks If this expelled water contains substances such as arsenic the groundwater can become contaminated Land subsidence the gradual sinking of land due to excessive pumping is common in delta environments and can be measured Buried clays may be analogous to dirty sponges releasing contaminated water when squeezed during pumping Erban says By analyzing satellite radar observations of the area the

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/arsenic-in-well-water-runs-deep-in-vietnam/ (2016-02-12)
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  • After Sandy, barrier system is polluted but intact - Futurity
    University Washington University in St Louis Yale University Earth and Environment Related Articles Solar energy solution buried in the mud Digging deep for clues to Asian water crisis Can mangrove forests save coastal areas Play Share This Article facebook twitter Action googleplus Google linkedin LinkedIn pinterest Pinterest reddit Reddit Stumbleupon mail Email Print The sand largely took the blow says researcher Jamie Austin Like a good barricade the barrier system absorbed the significant blow but held Credit Oliver Rich Flickr font by Vernon Adams After Sandy barrier system is polluted but intact Stony Brook University University of Texas at Austin Posted by Kimberly Berger Texas on December 13 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4 0 International license Hurricane Sandy didn t seriously damage the offshore barrier system that controls erosion on Long Island report scientists Long term concerns remain about the effects on the region of sea level rise pollutants churned up by the storm within back barrier estuaries and the damage closer to shore The findings presented at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union are based on pre storm survey data compared with post storm data acquired through a collaborative rapid response science mission to the south shore of Long Island John Goff and Beth Christensen on the R V Seawolf outside Manhattan while shipping out to the sites of their offshore survey in January 2013 Credit U Texas at Austin The purpose of the mission conducted last January was to assess the post Sandy health of the offshore barrier system that protects the New York Harbor and southwestern Long Island region against damage from future storms Related Articles On Futurity Texas A M University In Beijing weather and pollution are a deadly combo New York University Calories on the menu but does anyone care Washington University in St Louis Are flood levels in U S midwest 5 feet too low The team conducted marine geophysical surveys of the seafloor and shallow subsurface to map the sedimentary impact of the hurricane on the beach barrier systems of selected bay inlet and nearshore areas of portions of the south shore of Long Island Using a CHIRP compressed high intensity radar pulse sonar system and an even higher frequency seafloor mapping system supplied by Stony Brook University the scientists used two research vessels to profile the seafloor and upper sediment layers of the ocean bottom They surveyed three representative segments of the shoreface that protects Long Island each segment about 15 meters deep one mile offshore and roughly six square miles in size The storm they found did not significantly erode these sampled segments of shoreface The shape of the bedforms that make up the barrier system did not change a whole lot says co principal investigator John Goff of the Institute for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin Where we might have expected to see significant erosion based on long term history not a lot happened nothing that ate into

    Original URL path: http://www.futurity.org/sandy-barrier-systems-polluted-intact/ (2016-02-12)
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