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  • Capitol Watch 2016 - Week 6
    them in the shins If you did you d see some land acquisition south of the lake Since the beginning of 2016 more than 40 billion gallons of dirty Lake Okeechobee water has been released eastward into the St Lucie River That water plus drainage from canals in Martin and St Lucie counties and local runoff has pushed the salt out of the estuary and created a plume of black water pushing through the St Lucie Inlet and out into the Atlantic Ocean The discharges are killing the estuary s oysters and sea grasses in an area already suffering ecological calamity Our Florida legislators need to focus on this catastrophe now Public Lands We are still concerned with the public lands bill HB 1075 SB 1290 though some progress has been made insofar as the House version has taken out the language that conservation land acquisition money can be used for pipes and pumps We are working to ensure that the bill in no way harms the state s ability to protect our lands and waters and to ensure that crucial wildlife habitats remain sustainable The Budget With the Session ending on March 11 the proposed Budget numbers are coming into focus The bill number is HB 5001 General Appropriations Act Unfortunately as was the case last year the Legislature is not following the mandate supported by 75 of voters when Amendment 1 passed in 2014 At present although the language of Amendment 1 directs the Legislators to use 33 of real estate transfer fees for land and water conservation our elected leaders are not doing that Amendment 1 revenue is estimated to generate 652 million this year that could be applied to land conservation One third of this figure is approximately 215 million But the House proposes to spend

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/Capitol-Watch-2016---Week-6.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • GARDENERS, AGAIN, PLEASE PLANT MILKWEED FOR THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY
    try to help this beautiful and amazing and unique butterfly It needs all the help we can give it The five native Florida milkweeds are Asclepias incarnata Swamp Milkweed Asclepias perennis Aquatic Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa L Butterfly Weed Asclepias variegata White Milkweed Aclepias viridis Green Antelopehorn Milkweed You can find this list with a description and photos at http monarchwatch org bring back the monarchs milkweed milkweed profiles Your local County Extension Agent is a good source of information about what variety is best for your area The Monarch Joint Venture organization http monarchjointventure org recommends NOT planting a variety of milkweed called Tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica Our non migrating monarch populations south of Orlando will use it but are better off with other native milkweeds Tropical milkweed is popular and commonly available in nurseries Scientific studies are now proving that Tropical milkweed harbors and spreads a serious disease known as O Ophryocystis elektroscirrha that is devastating to monarchs that feed on it They become unable to fly and often die If you already have this milkweed growing on your Florida property trim it back to about six inches throughout the fall and winter or better yet replace it with another and native milkweed All milkweeds are perennials and some can be grown from cuttings Cuttings provide a way of producing new plants in a relatively short time and it avoids some of the difficulties of starting plants from seeds To start cuttings cut the stems underwater then coat the bottom of the stem with a strong rooting hormone The stems should be placed in sand vermiculite or potting soil that is kept continuously moist Cuttings can usually be transplanted in 6 10 weeks Survival is best when cuttings are made from green stems 1 3 inch diameter obtained from

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/GARDENERS%2c-AGAIN%2c-PLEASE-PLANT-MILKWEED-FOR-THE-MONARCH-BUTTERFLY.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • THANK YOU FELLOW FLORIDIANS!
    Energy Everglades Restoration Regional Offices and Programs See what s going on in your region Looking for FWF s Latest News You can find it here Press Releases FWF Activities Florida News Blog Social Media Florida Fish Wildlife News Publication How to Help Support Us Membership Sweepstakes FWF Partners Affiliate Organizations Conservation Allies Friends Donations of Stock Special Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund THANK YOU FELLOW FLORIDIANS Date 04 03 2015 MANY THANKS TO ALL THOSE WHO CONTACTED FLORIDA SENATORS ABOUT FULLY FUNDING THE FLORIDA FOREVER PROGRAM SENATORS ALTMAN JOYNER SOTO AND BRADLEY ALL ASKED FOR MORE MONEY AND WE ARE MAKING PROGRESS WEDNESDAY THE FULL SENATE AGREED TO ADD FUNDING THOUGH STILL SHORT OF WHAT IS NEEDED FOR THE NEXT THREE WEEKS WE WILL NEED TO KEEP TELLING OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS TO DO THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE AND FULLY FUND FLORIDA FOREVER BUT PAT YOURSELVES ON THE BACK YOUR EFFORTS HAVE MADE A HUGE AND POSITIVE DIFFERENCE Please thank the following Senators for listening to the people Senator Thad Altman 850 487 5016 altman thad web flsenate gov Senator Arthenia Joyner 850 487 5019 joyner arthenia web flsenate

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/THANK-YOU-FELLOW-FLORIDIANS!--.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • FWF Partners with Save Our Siesta Sand 2
    region Looking for FWF s Latest News You can find it here Press Releases FWF Activities Florida News Blog Social Media Florida Fish Wildlife News Publication How to Help Support Us Membership Sweepstakes FWF Partners Affiliate Organizations Conservation Allies Friends Donations of Stock Special Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund FWF Partners with Save Our Siesta Sand 2 Date 03 03 2015 We are pleased to announce that we have established a partnership agreement with a group called Save our Siesta Sand SOSS2 in Siesta Key FL The Army Corps is proposing a dredge of Big Pass which would be the first time ever that this inlet has been dredged There is substantial concern that seagrasses and native habitats will be negatively impacted as well as water quality in Sarasota Bay The Army Corps is not currently planning to do an Environmental Impact Statement which would encompass both Big Pass and neighboring inlets The purpose of SOSS2 is to ensure that no harm comes to the environment beaches waterfront property or navigation in Big Pass You can learn more about this group at their website which is www soss2 com Please

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/FWF-Partners-with-Save-Our-Siesta-Sand-2.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • 6TH ANNUAL KIDS WILDLIFE HABITAT CONTEST...COMING UP!
    COMING UP Date 02 08 2015 On Earth Day in April 2015 the Florida Wildlife Federation will award a commemorative plaque and an age suitable gardening book to the Florida kid or kids 12 years old or under who have helped to establish and maintain a habitat for wildlife at home or on school property The habitat will also be featured on our website and in our newsletter Entries close March 31 2015 The Florida Wildlife Federation 2545 Blairstone Pines Drive Tallahassee FL 32301 is dedicated to encouraging young Floridians to be good environmentalists and to care for our native animals and plants We believe that time spent outdoors working on a habitat project is of great value in encouraging young people to learn about nature Experts say that lack of active outdoor play and projects contributes to many childhood health problems It s easy to enter Just tell us how the habitat provides the following four elements food water cover and a place to raise young Send some photos of your habitat preferably with children working there Teachers please note that it is not necessary for schoolyard habitats to be certified by National Wildlife Federation or any other organization

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/6TH-ANNUAL-KIDS-WILDLIFE-HABITAT-CONTEST...COMING-UP-.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Guidance on Use of Funds Dedicated by Amendment 1
    constitutional amendment in Florida history Support for Amendment 1 came from all regions of the state and spanned the political spectrum Florida voters demonstrated yet again their strong support for water and land conservation Ratification of Amendment 1 represents an historic opportunity for water and land conservation Amendment 1 is the largest state conservation funding measure in the history of the United States The Amendment is a clearly written set of priorities for spending documentary stamp taxes on water and land conservation More than 4 2 million Florida voters voted Yes to add these provisions to the Florida Constitution Florida s Water and Land Legacy the Vote Yes on Amendment 1 coalition looks forward to working with Governor Scott and the Florida Legislature to implement Amendment 1 in a manner that is consistent with the intent of the voters Given the over whelming popular mandate demonstrated across our state particularly with a more conservative mid term electorate we know that the Governor and Legislature will seek to faithfully implement the will of the voters The intent of the Water and Land Conservation Amendment as ratified by the voters is to restore spending for a highly successful group of long standing programs authorized in Florida statutes The amendment was drafted so that no implementing legislation is required the Legislature could simply appropriate funds to existing water and land conservation programs Amendment 1 will absorb state spending currently authorized under state law for existing debt service for Preservation 2000 Florida Forever Save our Everglades and Save our Coasts Bonds Amendment 1 will enhance state spending currently authorized through trust funds and other programs approved under state law for o Land Acquisition through the Florida Forever o Conservation Easements through the Rural and Family Lands program o Everglades Restoration o Land acquisition for

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/Guidance-on-Use-of-Funds-Dedicated-by-Amendment-1.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Florida Wildlife Federation Blog | Conservation, Florida Wildlife
    the transference of pollen from the anthers of one flower to the stigma of another In flowering plants the stigma is on the end of the pistil Once pollen is transferred to the stigma it travels down the pistil to the ovule where fertilization takes place and seeds are produced We usually think of insects such as bees and butterflies when we think of pollination but beetles hummingbirds moths some wasps and flies and even humans are also important in pollen dispersion SCARAB BEETLE ON A PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS Scarab beetles are found throughout the world except for Antarctica Some common ones are the June bug the Japanese beetle and the dung beetle Often brown or black in color tropical varieties can be iridescent or have a metallic sheen like this one above BEETLE ON ASHE MAGNOLIA Beetles are the largest order of insects with over 350 000 species This one on an Ashe magnolia flower is covered with pollen The Ashe magnolia grows well in northern Florida It is a small tree with big flowers and big leaves and has a sweet smell all excellent attractants to pollinators TWIN SPOT SKIPPER ON IRIS Pollinators are attracted through odor shape color and arrangement of the flowers HELICONID BUTTERFLY WITH POLLEN ON PROBOSCIS In invertebrates a proboscis is an elongated tubular mouthpart used for piercing or sucking food During feeding it is extended to reach the nectar of flowers When not in use it is coiled under the head MONARCH BUTTERFLY ON PURPLE THISTLE This monarch butterfly is using its proboscis to extract nectar from a thistle The thistle plant attracts many pollinators including butterflies and hummingbirds HONEYBEE INSIDE BUTTERFLY PEA Worker honey bees non reproductive females are specialized for pollen and nectar collection Their hind legs have a pollen basket that can carry large amounts of pollen back to the colony European honey bees not native to the U S are social bees meaning they share the work of building a nest and caring for the offspring The principle social bees in the Americas are the honey bee and the bumble bee native About 75 percent of all flowering plants on Earth rely on animals to transfer their pollen that makes about one in every three bites you eat says Kristen Potter an insect physiologist at Northern Arizona University In fact bees are so important to flowering crops that captive honeybees are sometimes driven from crop to crop at different times of the year to help pollinate plants around the country However due to a number of factors such as disease habitat loss and pesticides bee colonies are currently on the decline Both feral and captive bees have been threatened by these issues but this is why the native bee species are especially important There are around 4 000 species of native bees in North America according to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation They have been maintaining flora diversity of North America for thousands to millions of years and they re essential to continuing that says Rich Hatfield conservation biologist with the Xerces Society BEE ON BARTRAM S IXIA Some of Florida s native bees are digger bees sweat bees plasterer bees leafcutter bees bumble bees cuckoo bees and carpenter bees Carpenter bees are one of Florida s major pollinators in wild and urban habitats Most native bees are unlikely to sting unless disturbed grabbed or stepped on NATIVE BEE ON BARTRAM S IXIA 2 ULTRAVIOLET VIEW Many flying insects are attracted to ultraviolet light Some flowers use UV light as a come hither beacon In this photo a bee is on top of an anther DIGGER BEE ON RAYLESS SUNFLOWER The females rear their young in soil tunnels underground often close to one another but have no social structure like honeybees In a colony that sometimes number in the hundreds each female digs out nest cells and collects pollen for her young Digger bees visit a wide variety of flowers and are important in pollination What you can do to help pollinators Plant a pollinator garden of native flowering plants with blooms of varying shapes colors and sizes Have something that blooms every month of the year not just spring and fall Plant native host and nectar plants for butterflies from the aster family pea family various passion vines and the milkweed family Some of Florida s native milkweed host plants for monarch butterflies include Asclepias incarnata swamp milkweed A perennis aquatic milkweed and A tuberosa butterfly weed Don t use pesticides and herbicides Provide nesting sites with bundles of hollow plant stems or PVC pipe in a sheltered area of your garden Make a brush pile in your yard and leave old tree stumps and dead trees on your property Do remove hazardous snags Provide a water source For butterflies and bees place rocks or sand in a bird bath bowl that is placed on the ground Sponsor or attend a pollinator workshop in your area Spread the word If you would like to get a workshop going in the Panhandle please contact Bill or Marcia Boothe at 850 643 2583 If you are in another area of Florida contact your local NRCS National Resources Conservation Service office at http www nrcs usda gov wps portal nrcs main fl contact More valuable information on invertebrate protection is at http www xerces org Also an excellent source is the book Planting a Refuge for Wildlife Creating a Backyard Habitat for Florida s Native Animals Thank you to Bill and Marcia Boothe of Nature in Focus for the photos and also the title of this article Their website is at http NatureInFocus com A direct link to their butterfly and skipper photos is at http natureinfocus com galleries butterflies More pollen photos http remf dartmouth edu pollen2 pollen images 3 index html Colorized pollen photos http commons wikimedia org wiki File Misc pollen colorized jpg Pollination Graphics http www blog gurukpo com pollination http corporate britannica com pollination and

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/blog/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Florida Wildlife Federation Wildlife Legacy Club
    Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund Roseate Spoonbill Johnny Villaronga Everglades National Park Florida Wildlife Federation Wildlife Legacy Club Purpose The Wildlife Legacy Club WLC was established in 2007 to recognize a new level of donors to the Florida Wildlife Federation who have made a sizable gift to provide a legacy for wildlife preservation in Florida Wildlife Legacy Members by example or by deed will also be involved in encouraging others to leave a legacy to protect Florida s increasingly threatened wildlife Eligibility for Membership 1 A minimum donation of 5000 or 2 A bequest or other planned giving donation the value of which exceeds 5000 or 3 Being designated an Honorary Wildlife Legacy Member by the FWF Development Committee for exemplary fundraising efforts to protect Florida s wildlife Benefits of Membership 1 Florida Fish and Wildlife News subscription 2 Weekly updates Capital Watch regarding critical wildlife and conservation issues during the legislative session 3 Special invitations to upcoming outdoor recreation and conservation events and wildlife workshops 4 An annual high quality wildlife calendar 5 Free seasonal wildlife note cards 6 Discounts at the FWF Nature Store featuring Florida specific books and DVDs on landscaping gardening fishing wildlife identification children s products artwork music and more 7 Special invitations to field trips and guided tours to some of Florida s remaining wild places Duties of Membership 1 To tell others about the work of the FWF and to invite others to join the Wildlife Legacy Club and 2 To help identify special needs for wildlife protection and or to participate in wildlife preservation initiatives Designation of Donation Wildlife Legacy Members may designate the purpose of their gift to include 1 Funding the day to day operations of the Florida Wildlife Federation 2 Funding FWF

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/Membership/Wildlife-Legacy-Club.aspx (2016-05-01)
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