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  • Wildlife Habitat Program
    Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund Wildlife Habitat Program The Florida Wildlife Federation in concert with National Wildlife Federation is offering all Florida residents an opportunity to take part in the Wildlife Habitat Program The goal is to promote and expand gardening in Florida Created in 1993 the nationwide program has certified the gardening efforts of people at over 171 112 sites in the country 11 255 plus are in Florida including more than 4925 schools of which more than 418 are in Florida There are 69 certified Communities in the nation 9 of which are in Florida The program has been updated and renewed Fresh information and publications are now available to help Floridians of all ages and backgrounds to discover the wonders of nature right in their own backyards Florida is one of the fastest growing states in America and our wildlife habitat is shrinking at an alarming rate Each time a developer replaces undeveloped land with lots for dwellings or commercial activities creatures that once lived on that land must find other space that will support their needs In urban areas especially pockets of terrain suitable for sustaining animal life will help to ameliorate this displacement Wildlife needs four basic elements food water cover and a place to raise their young These things can be accomplished on a piece of ground as small as three by eight feet The methods for planning for and providing these basic elements can be simple and inexpensive or as elaborate as the property owner chooses A side benefit to gardening with native plants is they need less water fertilizer and insecticide than exotic plants and so are kind to the environment and require less care to thrive Trading time consuming lawn care

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/Habitat/Wildlife-Habitat-Program.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Habitat Legacy Photos
    of Stock Special Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund HABITAT PHOTO GALLERY Photo Gallery Annex Habitat of Karen Sutliffe Oakland Park FL Dragon Fly Dragon Fly Baby Blue Jay Blue Jay Habitat of Carole Tebay Milton FL Habitat Habitat of Deborah Biesbrock Milton FL Deer Habitat of Wendy Kaplan Tamarac FL Great Egret Hawk Anhinga with Clownfish Habitat of Mike McInnes Sunrise FL Opossum Habitat of Roxanne Snyder and Sandra Stone Titusville FL Sandhill Cranes Habitat of Cheryl Budnik Frostproof FL Great Blue Heron Anhinga with fish Eastern Meadowlark Hen Mallards Florida softshell turtle Anhinga Zachary s Habitat Orlando FL Zachary 11 years old who created and maintains this habitat Gulf fritillary on zinnia Giant swallowtail on milkweed Monarch on milkweed Monarch chrysallis Queen on milkweed White peacock on passion vine Habitat of Rebecca Brooks Merritt Island FL Pipevine swallowtail and chrysalis Pipevine swallowtail caterpillars Gulf fritillary Giant swallowtail Monarch caterpillar Zebra longwing Habitat of Wayne and Jan May Clewiston FL Blue Jay Gray Cat Bird White winged Dove Yellow throated Warbler Purple Martin Brown headed Cow Birds Sandhill Cranes Cooper s Hawk Habitat of Wendy Stout Safety Harbour FL Certified Habitat Sign Pileated Woodpecker Wildlflowers Armadillo Habitat of Holly Gosinski Sarasota FL Tadpoles Water feature Black racer Gulf fritillary Red bellied woodpeckers Blue jay Habitat of Gina Beardmore Sarasota FL Deer Sandhill Cranes Fulvous Whistling Ducks Tri colored heron with a bluegill a friendly squirrel Anhinga drying wings Pileated woodpecker Hawk Great egret Habitat of Lynn Harding Sarasota bobcat Habitat of Jerry Dobak Possum Hollow Hallandale turtle opossum red bellied woodpecker giant swallowtail raccoon raccoon raccoon opossum Habitat of Scot DiStefano Fort Lauderdale birdbath with visitor opossum great horned owl land crab pileated woodpecker red bellied woodpecker The Dreyer Family

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/Habitat/Habitat-Legacy-Photos.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Habitat Photo Gallery
    Releases FWF Activities Florida News Blog Social Media Florida Fish Wildlife News Publication How to Help Support Us Membership Sweepstakes FWF Partners Affiliate Organizations Conservation Allies Friends Donations of Stock Special Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund PHOTO GALLERY ANNEX The gallery below contains of photos of National Wildlife Federation certified wildlife habitats in Florida If you would like to share

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/Habitat/Photo-Gallery.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • FWF Wildlife Habitat Videos
    Restoration Regional Offices and Programs See what s going on in your region Looking for FWF s Latest News You can find it here Press Releases FWF Activities Florida News Blog Social Media Florida Fish Wildlife News Publication How to Help Support Us Membership Sweepstakes FWF Partners Affiliate Organizations Conservation Allies Friends Donations of Stock Special Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/Habitat/Habitat-Videos.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Launched to Reverse Decline of Pollinators
    to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of pollinators During the announcement Mrs Obama asked one of the children participating in a harvest of the White House Kitchen Garden What do pollinators do The young man said They spread pollen around Pollinators are essential for a healthy ecosystem and for productive agriculture By spreading pollen around they fertilize plants resulting in seeds and fruits Pollinators are responsible for 1 out of 3 bites of food we take each day and yet pollinators are in decline due to loss of habitat disease pesticide use changing weather patterns and other factors By all of us working together we can help to revive the health of honeybees native bees beetles butterflies including the monarch hummingbirds certain bats and other pollinators across America What you can do to help pollinators 1 Plant a pollinator garden at your home local school or community park of native flowering plants with blooms of varying shapes colors and sizes Include something that blooms every month 2 Plant native host and nectar plants for butterflies from the aster family pea family various passion vines and the milkweed family Some of Florida s native milkweed host plants for monarch butterflies include Asclepias incarnata swamp milkweed A perennis aquatic milkweed and A tuberosa butterfly weed 3 Create a healthy habitat Don t use pesticides and herbicides 4 Provide nesting sites with bundles of hollow plant stems or PVC pipe in a sheltered area of your garden Make a brush pile in your yard and leave old tree stumps and dead trees on your property 5 Provide a water source For butterflies and bees place rocks or sand in a bird bath bowl that is placed on the ground 6 Support businesses that support pollinators

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/Million-Pollinator-Garden-Challenge-Launched-to-Reverse-Decline-of-Pollinators.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Good News For Wildlife Habitats
    A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund Good News For Wildlife Habitats Date 10 04 2009 There is good news for wildlife habitat owners and others who want to plant and maintain their yards in a manner beneficial to wild life even though it might not comply with homeowners association or municipal rules Florida law now supports your efforts On June 30 2009 Governor Charlie Crist signed Senate Bill 2080 also called the Water Rights Bill One of the provisions in the bill states that any landscape that fits the 9 principles of Florida friendly planting use the right plant in the right place water efficiently fertilize appropriately mulch attract wildlife manage yard pests responsibly recycle reduce storm water runoff and protect the waterfront supersedes and takes precedence over all other municipal county and homeowner association rules ordinances or laws The reasoning behind the introduction and passage of this bill lies in the fact that lawn and landscape irrigation uses a tremendous amount of water in Florida seriously impacting the Floridan aquifer which provides the state s drinking water and feeds its springs and other ecosystems The state would like residents to be encouraged and supported to have the kind of yard that utilizes those 9 landscaping principles Those principles are encapsulated in National Wildlife Federation s wildlife habitat certification program which is actively supported and promoted by Florida Wildlife Federation with Florida specific information on our website www fwfonline org and also available by writing or telephoning us Lawn grasses are thirsty pesticides in our yards are damaging to our children s and pets health and eventually wind up in our waterways Florida Wildlife Federation is not recommending wholesale ripping out of Florida lawns but suggests that ways can be found to reduce the amount of turf

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/Good-News-For-Wildlife-Habitats.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • The Decline of The Pollinators
    Donations Programs FWF Photo Contest Create A Wildlife Habitat GreenStar Certification Sweepstakes FWF Scholarship Fund The Decline of The Pollinators Date 10 04 2009 By Patricia Pearson Florida Wildlife Federation Habitat Coordinator Every third bite we consume in our diet is dependent on the honeybee to pollinate that food according to Zac Browning vice president of the American Beekeeping Federation Beekeepers on the East Coast are reporting losses of more than 70 of the bees in commercial hives and those declines are mirrored in the wild bee populations Such declines have brought about a whole new industry beekeepers who rent out their bees to pollinate orange groves apple orchards nut trees and other pollinator dependent crops Pollination dependent crops include soybeans cotton grapes almonds apples oranges strawberries peanuts peaches blueberries all of which are Florida crops not to mention the things we grow in our home veggie gardens Some pollination can be done by wind or water or birds and bats but the great proportion of it depends on honeybees Florida s losses of bees are the same as other states on the East Coast and the causes are poorly understood They include introduced parasites such as the varoa mite loss of habitat and pesticides and too much monoculture on large agricultural lands Aerial application of pesticides or crop dusting widely practiced in Florida is a particular hazard for honeybees What can we do as Florida residents to help in this alarming situation Plant and cultivate native wildflowers These will provide wild bees with the nectar they need Do not use pesticides particularly those that have warnings that they are highly toxic to honeybees on the packaging Do use sprays of insecticidal soaps rotenone and the bacterial insecticide Thuricide instead of dusts if you must treat pests on your plants

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/The-Decline-of-The-Pollinators.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • CLIMATE CHANGE AND GARDENING
    for transportation and energy to save us Gardeners might be justified in doing that as it wasn t hobby gardening that caused the problems we face However there are other avenues we can take and even home gardeners can help turn global warming around No matter who caused it or how it was caused it will affect us all so perhaps we can be a part of the solution Trees Cherish them if you have them plant them if you don t Shade trees can reduce energy consumption by air conditioners up to 70 Trees also absorb and store carbon dioxide CO2 the gas primarily responsible for global warming One tree can remove a ton of CO2 from the atmosphere in its lifetime Gas powered yard tools Minimize their use They use fossil fuels and emit pollution Human power behind a lawn mower or clippers or weeding by hand is much kinder to the environment Just replacing some of your lawn with mulched shrubbery beds and native wildflower gardens will cut down on lawn mower CO2 emissions as well as noise pollution and also provide some wonderful exercise There are many resources online which can help you find and identify native plants Go to Google and type in Florida native plants and you will be amazed at all the resources out there FWF also sells several Florida Specific gardening books in the Florida Nature Store Plant only natives in new plantings Native plants are our best weapon in precluding invasive non native plant intrusions Natives usually need less water and fertilizer than exotic non native plants Florida natives can usually withstand heat and water shortages better than exotic plants Heavier downpours and more intense storms associated with global warming will lead to flooding in some vulnerable areas but wider drought and heat wave conditions may well lead to more residential yard watering restrictions in others As a side benefit native plants afford the best food for native wildlife and birds Ask your local nursery if you have questions as to whether a plant is native to Florida There are many good books available see below for some sources Rain barrels and wise watering It s time to consider some simple old fashioned ways to conserve water as well as new ways Rain barrels are becoming more widespread as householders are discovering the joys of always having a guilt free water supply on hand If roof water isn t captured as in rain barrels it may go to waste as regards your watering needs There are very decorative barrels on the market and treatment to preclude mosquito breeding in them is easy Water mornings and evenings only as mid day watering results in much evaporation loss and use drip irrigation for the same reason Mulching is an important component of water conservation for plantings Your local nursery will have many choices of materials for mulch however a good home grown one is grass clippings and raked leaves which also saves gas

    Original URL path: http://www.fwfonline.org/News-and-Pressroom/CLIMATE-CHANGE-AND-GARDENING.aspx (2016-05-01)
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