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  • Good Radio Shows: 2015 Episodes
    and sisters from the black heritage It s something that we re dealing with and even more so on the reservations because rights were only given to our people maybe less than 70 years ago rights as Native Americans or rights as American citizens and a lot of things were brought to us brand new less than that amount of time ago so it s dealing with that And when it s forced upon when I say oppression and I use oppression when a way of life or a way of being or a way of a society is forced upon on normally a peaceful people is how I like to explain oppression onto our people and the roles of men and women have changed completely Kryder Valerie what do you call that huge conflict Siow In my perspective I call it colonization A lot of what we re dealing with are the after effects of colonization more boarding schools unfair treatment policies that have existed to terminate our people and so I see historical trauma too I see that a lot in my own family Kryder Valerie when you say colonization what other conflicts come out of that for people today indigenous people today in the U S Siow I think a lot of it has to do with different interpretations When I think of such things as the way our social structure our government structures I m from Laguna Pueblo and I think about how women have such an integral part in our culture our clans knowledge is passed to the mother But when the Spanish came and later of course Mexican rule and the United States took over I feel like women were pushed out and so I see conflict in that area how the traditional roles of women have changed and try to restore that Kryder Greg Grey Cloud can you talk about being forced into a white way of being Talk more about that Is there anything that people can do that s positive to overcome that feeling Grey Cloud There s many things to overcome that feeling and that oppression from the United States government and the non Native society It comes to our people and our people utilize that oppression and it becomes internalized oppression We use it amongst one another as well The positive thing that we can do is learn It s the new turn of the century and it s a new year and we can all learn learn this education but don t forget about your indigenous way of life Don t forget about your ancestors and the history that our blood carries so learn both I know it s difficult to learn both but the non Natives believe it s a religion whereas we indigenous people believe no it s a way of life It s not a religion It s not something that s practiced It s not something that s sold or shown or boasted about It s something that we as people take seriously and then we can learn both our Native roots what our ancestors left us and we can as well learn the non Native education and we can succeed succeed in their world and succeed in ours but never forgetting both sides so balance Kryder Greg the idea of success is kind of weird because I wonder if there is a white way of success which is forced on you Is there a Native way to succeed and if so what is it Grey Cloud Well I believe the indigenous way of success is there s a lot of different things but being an indigenous person is about what you can do for others not what others can do for you I look at both societies Native and non Native you look at non Native where they re about what other people can provide for you What can you take from the overall people What can you get from them That s so not an aboriginal or indigenous way of thinking whereas we think on the reservations and our people think how can I help you What is it I can help you to do what you need to do what you need to get done Difficult times or hard times times of joy it s all about helping one another and once you help somebody you have success Siow Along with that too I m also thinking about the foreign concept such as blood quantum That s a huge thing for us Prior to outsiders coming in we never had that concept you re this much of this tribe and that has caused a lot of internal conflict among our own people Kryder How do people deal with blood quantum Siow Well right now there are 550 federally recognized tribes and in order to be an enrolled member you have to meet some kind of either blood quantum some kind of measurement of that or either have to prove your ancestry and so being an enrolled member of a tribe they give people what they call benefits and so I think that has caused a lot of conflict because maybe you weren t raised near your community maybe your parents moved There are so many things that can affect that It s inclusive exclusive and you also see people who think if I m a certain blood quantum I can be a part of this tribe and get the benefits So things like that I would say are results as Greg mentioned of oppression and colonization That s just one concept that I see that has created a lot of conflict Kryder Valerie Siow how do you feel about non indigenous people who may have a problem with you or they may deal with you in a way that you don t like Is there some kind of racism by white people or African American or Hispanics towards indigenous people Siow

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL142_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2015 Episodes
    a debater and all this kind of stuff but she never ran an organization so if I feel her in back of me saying I go like You know what Amy This is hard I think you do and the other thing is I have found people that cope with their lives with death with the living conditions they re in and they still have a sense of humor And getting to know Desmond Tutu as kind of my mentor and particularly after Peter died he was great for me I could say Well maybe we shouldn t do this bakery because we just had a driver shot and killed I mean there were really bad things that happened And he said No no You must do it You can do it When Peter died it was colon cancer at the end I was trying to keep him involved and he said You can do it I think I accepted the challenge I think it s more common than people realize that the need to be positive to fill a void and to go on in honoring that person you lost in some way is a part of us as much if not more than anger and bitterness Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with Easy Nofemela one of the 4 men who served prison time for the mob beating and death of Amy Biehl in 1993 Easy and the others were granted amnesty with the Biehl s supporting the TRC Process He and Ntobeko Peni later worked for the Amy Biehl Foundation in South Africa Paul Ingles I m speaking with Easy Nofemela from South Africa Easy an anthropologist Nancy Shepherd Hughes who was working with you after your release helped get you together with Linda and Peter Biehl Can you tell our listeners something about that meeting Easy Nofemela It was bringing the bridge closer together because Nancy she do a great job What she does was she came to my cottage house and she wanted to speak with me and wanted to ask me some questions Peter is I call Domkulu Domkulu is Grandfather a person who can spoil children A person who understands the situation here in South Africa better than the whites in South Africa A person who is able to care and love Peter he came to my house to talk And we asked Linda to come She was in the States And Linda after I think a week or two weeks she came with Linda and from there we become too close too much and become Makulu and Domkulu and two children two sons myself and Ntobeko Let s forgive and reconcile one another They understand that we had been involved in their daughter s death But the way they handled the environment here in South Africa is really exciting and we see a change Ingles Your many years of collaborating with the Biehl family after being involved with Amy s death have seem extraordinary to many So they understood why it was the way it was and they cared about the steps that needed to be taken to make it better What lessons do you think it all represents for people listening who may be faced with having to resolve big and small conflicts in their own lives Nofemela First there is a respect among the people You are not bigger than another person We are all one and the same If we have a problem we need to talk about it Ingles Once you sit down and talk with another that has a very different experience than you in this case whites and blacks what are some suggestions about talking together better Nofemela People need to talk to other people s what do you call it maybe I can say style or culture Because if you can look in the white aresa a neighbor and maybe another neighbors that doesn t know each other So also they are distant from us That s what we re trying to bring To understand us To understand them If I m fighting with my neighbors that neighbor will try to call these two neighbors to sit down and talk You become now the same person in the same problem that needed to be solved You see Ingles Yes Nofemela Why So they can make sure they understand us And as I said the whites if there is a problem we ll sit down and talk and then it will be better Ingles How is life between whites and blacks in South Africa today Would you say there s been improvement and what needs improving still Nofemela Paul it s a big improvement I m telling you My generation and my parents used to say Stay at home When you see a white person you must run away because they can be disappeared or arrested or be beaten Today our children my children when they see the white person they jump on them There is no fear they love they talk they re laughing You can see when the visitors when they talk with the kids You can see the love you can see the care You can see that the kids will get what they need You see They re understanding Also with visitors coming we talked with them and said Listen now this is not a South African issues and problems in the world This is a world problem that we need to solve I feel we here in South Africa we treat whites and blacks just fine There are whites staying in Guguletu in the township enjoying life We meet and talk There is no problem We need also like an exchange program where we can organize maybe schools or maybe three schools the township schools and overseas or white schools and keep talking to one another When they re talking like asking questions someone stands up and talks when you

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL141_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2013 Episodes
    ANC but how do you celebrate someone who sort of ends a reign like that That s unclear Ingles Well there was a suggestion from one of guests who said they thought that they would release Mandela and that he would be frail and human and not be this myth That remark suggests that maybe the whole idea of releasing him wasn t quite as benevolent as it might have seemed later Richman Well nothing is ever benevolent as they might want it to seem later That was Allister Sparks who is an historian and journalist who talked about that He is a really insightful analyst of South African history and politics He was an important interview Ingles Joe when you talk to so many people about another person inevitably a few things are heard consistently What would you say most all of your interview subjects agreed upon in their assessment or characterization of Nelson Mandela Richman What so many of them would say about Mandela and it s been said so often that it s a bit of a cliché but it s a cliché that I think is true is that what he gave to that moment to the country and to that moment in history was getting out of prison and not feeling bitter not feeling angry but being able to go to the negotiating table to be able to look forward People may disagree about the pros and cons of how that country emerged from that moment but the fact that it emerged basically essentially bloodless and was able to make that transition to democracy was something that no one really expected The tone was set by Mandela s feeling of you don t look back in bitterness you look forward and try to make something better Ingles What was the most unexpected thing you heard about him that maybe isn t part of what you have learned to expect to hear about Nelson Mandela Richman We think now of Mandela as this kind of wonderful grandfather smiling figure and just this loveable old man If you go back in history you re reminded that he was considered a terrorist and by many definitions he was a terrorist in the sense that he led the movement away from non violence to start a bombing campaign and to arm the struggle It s really hard to separate any moment in history from the context in which it happens but it s also important to go back and remember that Mandela was considered a terrorist and he in fact was leading the Umkhonto we Sizwe the armed struggle of the movement History is never as black and white and as easy as we like to think Ingles What does his story offer to inspire and inform the still oppressed people around the globe Richman It s just interesting that before the transition I think everyone would have thought that when South Africa changed it was going to change in an ugly way This was happening around the time of the Rwanda genocide and a lot of people a lot of scholars and historians have pointed out that Rwanda was the case where everyone expected things would happen peacefully and South Africa is where they thought all the bloodshed would happen So as you look back with 20 20 vision of history it s just important to remember that no one expected South Africa to change as peacefully in a sense as it did Peacefully is a relative term It was ugly in so many ways and so many people were killed and there was a lot of fighting among many groups Something happened in that country at that time to allow this huge tectonic shift in that country to happen with relatively little bloodshed There are still so many places where people are fighting for something similar Anytime that there is a movement that in a sense over a long period of time succeeds it s like historical inspiration Ingles Right it s a template it s a possibility Richman You just have to know that it has worked before Ingles What do you think this story has to offer to inspire and inform people just trying to manage any conflict in their lives Richman I think that there is the moment where the ANC sat down with the National Party and Pik Botha who was one of the ministers of the National Party the white ruling party and talked about Mandela giving this whole history of the Afrikaner people That s how he started basically saying I understand your history I understand your issues and I understand where you re coming from That obviously made a huge impact on him because as he said here I am about to sit down at the negotiating table with someone I ve spent two decades thinking of as a terrorist and he had studied me my own grievances and my own history I think there s just something incredibly powerful about understanding your enemy both tactically and strategically but much more than that understanding the other side because nothing is ever simple and black and white and you see the cracks in everyone s stories and everyone s history I think that trying to understand the other side is what Mandela made a point of doing and I think that s a lesson that I take away from this whole history no one is ever so simple You have these preconceived notions about the way that someone is or the way that some history is but when you dig a little more you realize that you were not right There is always something a little more complicated there Peace Talks Radio Host Carol Boss Dorothy Cotton From 1960 to 1972 Dr Cotton was the educational director for Southern Christian Leadership Conference and worked very closely with Dr Martin Luther King Jr Dorothy Cotton There has to be a vision and

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL124_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2013 Episodes
    to donate his things to kids or young people who would really appreciate them because he has very nice things and he took care of his clothes Everything is hanging or folded It s just heartbreaking I went from having a house full of life and energy and love to like nothing Everything is just silence It s almost deadly to be in this house because I m just so used to him and his friends being here or Blair trying to cook or saying Ma take me here or Let s go there He traveled with me We went to Vegas and Orlando and we got to do a lot of fun things together but everything just suddenly stopped and I didn t even have a warning He wasn t sick He was snatched from me We invested all this into our child We invested our time our love everything to make sure he was successful and he wasn t He s lying in the cemetery Boss Annette Nance Holt did you go to support groups Holt Actually when this first happened to me the fire department recommended that I go to a counselor So I went to this counselor about three times in a row and all I could do was cry the whole time until one time she asked me What do you love doing I was like I loved my son I loved doing everything I possible could to make sure he was successful She said What activities were you doing before this I said I was learning to play golf She said Well you should play golf That was it for me that day I could not talk to somebody who told me that golf would solve my problem because golf ain t solved my problem yet So I ended up going to a group called Parents of Murdered Children that s headed by parents who have lost their children to violence There I found other people like me and they could understand what I was going through and not thinking the answer is you might need medicine or you might need to keep coming to this therapist or do some kind of fun thing like golf That wasn t the answer I needed someone to tell me that what I was feeling was okay and that the chest pains and the anxiety were all because of losing my child I have no medical history like that I worried about forgetting things Someone said We forget a lot because we ve been traumatized and people don t look at gun violence survivors as being traumatized We talk about veterans being traumatized We re traumatized here in the City of Chicago Imagine all the young people who are going to be traumatized from what they witness We started a group called Purpose over Pain where a group of parents got together and formed an organization of our own We actually do outreach to parents who have lost their children to violence whether that be providing money for funerals or passes or whatever services they need cemeteries they can afford if they want to cremate buying flowers and just talking to them and saying Hey you can call us anytime you need and eventually get them into the group of Parents of Murdered Children The other two things we do is Common Sense Gun Legislation We ve been to D C we ve been to Springfield and Chicago and even New York with Mayors Against Illegal Guns and The Brady Campaign to Prevent Handgun Violence We ve been everywhere talking about gun violence and how we can change it so that innocent people don t die every day because guns are in the hands of people who shouldn t have them The third thing that we do is actually go out to community groups We go out to high schools and grammar schools and even parent groups and talk about what the long lasting effects of gun violence does to families and communities Boss Annette what do you say to a mother who is going through what you went through the murder of your child Holt Really I can tell them I m sorry because they became part of a sorority they didn t sign up to join I just want to say I m sorry because we failed them If we keep getting more children murdered behind ours we ve failed We ve failed as people as a society as the United States of America We have failed We ve failed to provide the most common right that we should offer people the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness We haven t offered that Boss Annette not everyone can turn their pain out to be active How did you personally make that transition Holt The first day Blair was murdered I think it was a Thursday I remember coming home and I was numb Then the reporters started calling and people started coming by I immediately just set up and started speaking out because I m that kind of person anyway I ve always been the kind of person who has spoken out against things that were unjust and unfair and to have your only child taken from you and a good kid I had to say something because Blair meant so very much to me as I m sure all kids mean a lot to their parents but I just couldn t suffer in silence I really couldn t People thought that the media took advantage of me No they didn t They gave me a voice They gave Blair a voice Blair wasn t just a African American teenager who was a gang banger like they want to tell us Most black kids are gang bangers or drug dealers or not in school Blair was an honor student He was respectful He loved his parents He worked He helped other people

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL123_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2013 Episodes
    the mother of this young girl that died I was ordered pre trial and on parole not to have any contact with her and I ve never tried to contact her I just pray in my own right that she s found healing There s sort of a void there I know that may sound selfish on my part but I hope that they found healing and there s not something more that could have been done there I caused harm that you can t repair There s really nothing I can do to bring that other than try to live my life as an example and hopefully maybe deter somebody else from going down the same road that I did Boss Tell us what happened in that circle The leader of that circle did a pre interview with you and you accepted full accountability for what happened Weathers Yeah I never tried to shun responsibility for what I had done We had the preemptive circles amongst my own family and he kind of laid down the ground rules speak to each other with respect and wanted to make sure that I was in a place where I was going to accept responsibility and be present at the circle whichever way that might have gone If the victim s family is going to be angry and need to vent that anger an offender somebody in that position needs to be able to sit there and there s not really a response that needs to be given but if that s what brings healing then those things need to be able to be said I do remember a victim s family telling me about the tears that were cried and the hurt that was caused and it was a long process of listening to that and not being able to have an answer for that really hurt because there wasn t really anything I could say at that point in time that was going to make a difference Boss Well how did you feel when you were hearing the victim s family the victim who was injured who was also there Weathers I felt horrible To come into a place as the bad guy to come in to sit in a room as the person that caused harm and to go face to face with people that you ve directly hurt and people that you ve indirectly hurt Police officers are at the scenes of DUI crashes and they re exposed to traumatic injury night after night Unfortunately we have here in New Mexico a high rate of DUI related crashes and deaths and it takes a toll on law enforcement Judges and district attorneys are in constant contact with victims and with people that are hurt by this All these things being faced with this and this person going there was another couple that were in a car next to where we crashed and they had a young boy in the car who was traumatized because he saw the whole thing and so just an eye opener This wasn t just a carload of young people that were too drunk to be on the road It wasn t just a two car accident This crime affected a large number of people and as a ripple effect it affected the whole community Seeing that large scale effect on people was really heartbreaking to me And on the other side of that coin with the other victim s family they were very very open in their forgiveness of me and in talking to me and saying I hope that you can pick up the pieces and live after this Here I m the person that caused this harm and these people are crying and putting their arms around me by the time this thing was over Peace Talks Radio Host Carol Boss talks with Deon Young graduate of Ralph Bunche High School in West Oakland CA and Eric Butler Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth RJOY facilitator at Ralph Bunche High School Deon Young So my experience before arriving at Ralph Bunche was very how can I say dangerous very dangerous I was very into the streets a little too much I was getting in a lot of trouble I went to jail and a whole lot of stuff The reason why they sent me to Ralph Bunche was because I had got shot at at Oakland Tech They didn t want me at their school no more so they sent me there I was low on credits Carol Boss Okay so you got shot at What were some of the reasons that you were in jail Young I had got caught with a gun Boss Okay What was your attitude when you first arrived at Ralph Bunche Young My attitude was to do something with my life not to just be like everybody else It was like a new start Boss Eric Eric Butler Yes The program is managed by Eric Butler who sat next to Dion in the studio Boss Can you describe the school for us Butler Ralph Bunche is a continuation high school and here in Oakland it would almost be fair for me to say it s the place where the contemporary high schools send the kids that they deem as problem kids It s a place where they send the throw aways It s about 70 African American and 30 Latino Boss What did you find when you arrived over a year ago Butler Well the first thing that I realized was we have two security guards on campus and it s not hard to notice that when the kids are entering into the school they re being wanded down like they re at the airport I put myself in their shoes and I thought that I probably would be aggravated if I had to be frisked every day of my school career They got that unwelcoming

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  • Good Radio Shows: Episodes 2014

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    Original URL path: /episodes_09.htm (2016-02-13)


  • Good Radio Shows: 2008 Episodes

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    Original URL path: /peaceTalksL69.htm (2016-02-13)


  • Good Radio Shows: 2009 Episodes

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    Original URL path: /peaceTalksL70.htm (2016-02-13)




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