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  • Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes
    people It s still the best institution we have and all of us have a role to play People have a role to play also The solution I think begins with voters sending to Washington more pragmatic result oriented members who are willing to compromise to get things done Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan D Ingles What s your theory about what s ramped up the incivility in political discourse so much Ryan I think it s a lot of different things I think it s a lot of the economic anxiety that s out there I think it always gets pushed on the backburner and we try to blame some other things but I really do think there s a general angst in the country of how are we going to make ends meet as a family or as a small business and that anxiety filters out into the public debate and people are looking for reasons to blame or people to blame for that the level of inequality the food insecurity the energy costs the health care costs or whatever the case may be And so I think a lot of times that income inequality is driving a lot of this and then media on top of it that really preys off of that stress and distress and really wedges you into one camp or the other and that kind of evolution over the past few years has really poisoned the political debate And then there s also the issue of the redistricting process that we have in America where districts have become either really really red or really really blue and so not many members of Congress have to come down to Washington D C from wherever they re from in the country and actually look to make compromise They are more concerned about protecting either their left flank or their right flank in a primary election as opposed to having a general election where they need to appeal to a broader audience and I think that s hurt it Then the gasoline on the fire is in the last year or so has been Citizens United So you take the economic anxiety and stress and the cost of just living today in America with the redistricting issues with the media and with the money in the campaigns and you have a perfect storm of really poisonous political discourse Ingles Isn t compromise and negotiating across aisle taken now as a sign of weakness in this political climate that often becomes a negative campaign ad during a campaign Ryan Yeah I think it is and I think it s because the district that people are representing is so very conservative or very liberal and so your base voters have the most power to either elect your or un elect you and they re the same people for example if you re coming out of a really hard republican district you come down and call Barrack Obama un American socialist fascist whatever the case may be he s not born in America I want to see his birth certificate and all of these things and then all of a sudden Barack Obama has a deal that he s worked out with Speaker Boehner on say for example taxes that person then can t be seen as voting with President Obama because he just got done saying he s an illegitimate President So how are you going to go back to your base voters and say hey well I had to do what was in the best interest of the country It becomes very very difficult to go back to those folks after you ve demonized each other and that s why I think we really just need to tone down the rhetoric a little bit so that there s room for solving some of these problems Ingles Would term limits help any Ryan No I actually think term limits would make things worse because you would have a bunch of people running around who wouldn t know what they were doing because it s so big of an operation just to figure things out I do think the answer really is redistricting reform providing more balanced districts that are closer to 55 45 than they are 65 35 and that would allow for someone to have to reach across the aisle and have to build some consensus and I think I m just fundamentally against term limits too because I think if I as a citizen like my Congressperson and I want to be able to vote for them and you say that person can t run anymore then you re really disenfranchising me So I m fundamentally against that but I think the core of this issue is the redistricting Ingles How do you make headway on the redistricting issue Ryan Well we re doing it in Ohio now There s a group that s putting it on the ballot for what happened in California where you have a citizens board that will redraw the Congressional districts based on having to be contiguous and having to be community based and some other media markets those kinds of things that really would allow a more balanced approach and having citizens involved so if the Republicans are in charge they re not gerrymandering and if the Democrats are in charge they not gerrymandering and actually have citizens who are saying this looks like a district that really culturally and through their media markets and the way that the city and the country have grown this is really a district that makes sense and it may be closer to 50 50 than 60 40 or 70 30 and I think that can end up being very helpful so we re passing a constitutional amendment in Ohio to do that and that can be very very helpful and other states I think need to do that as well There s an opportunity and a momentum gathering around the country and I see it when I m on the book tour or when I go to different events around the country in the mindfulness community in the yoga community of people who are really wanting to get more involved and bring a more peaceful I think approach to the public discourse and recognize that they are not going to agree with their Congressmen or anybody 100 of the time and so I m really hopeful because I ve been meeting people who are really excited about how we could possibly shift the dialogue in the country to a more sane dialogue and doing that by pushing out things like mindfulness and things like yoga and these things that really ground people and balance their nervous systems and calm their amygdala s and allow them to be human beings who can have disagreements without having like a lot of personal venom involved in the whole thing So I m hopeful that that is a country that s not too too far away and I get a lot of inspiration from the people who are out there trying to now get involved in the system to bring about that change and I think that s really really exciting Again I see the marines are implementing mindfulness We ve got the corporations that are doing it We see that the science is really starting to come online in a big way and so the case is being built for us really to move this stuff into these institutions and I think as we do that we can reconnect with those basic American values of self reliance and frugality and being a true conservative in the sense of not wasting our resources and really shifting the way our neighborhoods look and our downtowns look and our transportation systems look and what kind of energy use we have I think this can all change if this motivated group of people get involved in the political process and I see they are and I want to be a part of that Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with Western Washington University communications professor Michael Karlberg and Hakim Bellamy communications director for the Media Literacy Project Karlberg The media system in this country is unique in the Western world in that we ve handed the entire system over to for profit ventures who raise most of their money through advertisements which means the actual business model is manufacturing audiences and selling them to advertisers Within that business model the necessity the imperative financially is to try and manufacture the largest and most affluent audiences possible for the minimal cost In entertainment we see the trends towards say reality TV and so forth which reflect this basically sort of minimal cost maximum audience model which is a form of cheap spectacle In journalism unfortunately it s suffering from the same sort of imperatives not because journalists don t want to do excellent journalism but because the media as a business sort of presses us in that direction For instance television most television journalism has sort of degenerated into just sort of pundits debating from the left and the right which creates another form of cheap spectacle But even in a lot of the reporting that s happening then for instance around the election season it replicates this model It s not critical investigative journalism helping audiences actually understand the facts of the world we live in It s more putting microphones in front of politicians or their spokes people in order to construct again a cheap spectacle Ingles Hakim Bellamy What s good business and what s good governance There s a difference even though it seems like the way it plays out and in current sphere that there s not a difference That government is about somehow minimizing like Michael said resources to maximize output or labor and that shouldn t necessarily in our opinion be the form of government Yet what happens is is the government starts to move more and more into a business like sphere And media is a business It starts to move into this media sphere and it starts to take on those attributes of a well run business versus the attributes of a well run government So what we talk about and see a lot in media criticism and media theory is this idea of media as the fourth branch of government which is an interesting construct but it creates somewhat of a chicken and egg scenario as though media is responding to our need as a people that have governments as a vehicle for government and I think it s the other way around I think it s actually the buying of government or the takeover of government through this kind of corporate media construct So I just wanted to put that out there as an idea because when we start to look at what makes for business and good government we generally start to see two totally different things and even in a current conversation around government that s happening with the general election you hear a lot of this rhetoric about what s good business what s good business what s good business and we just assume as a corporate culture as a capitalist culture we assume that that s what s good for our country and good for democracy and it s sometimes just not so Ingles I guess the media would defend their approach by saying it works People are watching They enjoy it Let s talk a little bit about why people are drawn to it Karlberg Sure So if we think about the main ingredients of the kind of cheap spectacle I m talking about it s basically conflict drama and violence It s the equivalent of sugar salt and fat in junk food So what we have today is a sort of junk food media and of course it appeals to some real appetites that human beings have the same way that sugar salt and fat appeals to appetites we developed in millions of years of evolution and it served us well up to a point Our attentiveness to violence and conflicts also serve us very well in an evolutionary context but they don t serve us well today in a complex modern interdependent world where governance actually requires a lot of intelligence and sophisticated ability to think about issues that are complex and multi faceted So reducing those issues down to simple oppositional binaries doesn t serve the public It doesn t serve the processes of governance Ingles Well and you mentioned quoting from your article Partisan politics is founded on the assumption that human nature is fundamentally self interested and competitive It s very easy to see how the media that both of you have described targets that but evolutionary scholars would also debate whether that s a complete correct assumption pointing out that much of our evolution shows cooperation as another aspect of human nature Karlberg Absolutely This is a sort of deep underlying issue Our political system and our media system are basically founded on these sort of caricatured models of human nature that we re just selfish and aggressive animals and all the human sciences now are beginning to demonstrate that that s not the case As you said we re wired for competition and cooperation for egoism and altruism And which of these potentials is more fully expressed is actually a function in large part of our social environment which includes our media environment and our political system So we ve constructed political and media systems based on this sort of one dimensional view of human nature The result is that they actually further foster and cultivate our aggressive and competitive sides and set up a sort of negative feedback loop where that s more and more what we hear and see and so that s increasingly sort of what we expect and those aspects of our nature become more and more normalized especially in the public sphere Ingles Let s look at solutions here and Hakim from Media Literacy s standpoint I know media literacy is not just for young people but there s a sharp focus on trying to get this kind of thinking into schools to allow for some critical analysis If you re addressing a group of high school students about being wiser via media consumers elaborate a little bit more on what are the cautionary tales What are you asking them to understand about a world where there s a Fox News that leans to the right and MSNBC that leans to the left and radio talk shows that are far right far left How do you help them understand and what tools of thinking do you offer Bellamy Absolutely We want young people especially to do kind of the age old posture of youth and it s to question authority We don t want them to disrespect authority of course but we do want them to say when they re being told things from any kind of media outlet that you should always do your research and do your homework And they have more tools than ever at their disposal in order to really if they want to receive diversity and multiplicity of perspectives So a lot of times our mechanism for engaging young people is basically showing them all the tools that they have access to and usually that interest right there will do the rest Especially when we can walk into a classroom and ask them all to pull out their iPhones and they immediately think that it s a school they re going to tell us to shut them off and we re like no we actually want you to play with them here because we want you to find out ways to develop your own skills of digging So essentially we re trying to turn most media consumers into their own newsrooms their own reporters investigative reporters and really kind of engage them in this idea of creating media and that was something Michael alluded to earlier When they see things missing in the media things that don t represent them and they can t find them anywhere at that point it s like well are you going to fill the void I think that s where we get a lot of engagement as far as our approach to media literacy education is through the creation part and once we start showing them that they too can create messages which is part of the education process once we show them that they can create messages they understand that all these other messages are just created by people as well Ingles Also isn t another key question asking them to ask the question is there a bias Bellamy Absolutely Rather than saying what is this candidate saying in 30 seconds what are they not saying There s a whole lot you can not say in 30 seconds if you re talking about something as complex as immigration policy There s not a lot of educating you can really do in a short news piece or campaign piece So we first get them engaged in that And then of course yes we start talking about the techniques of persuasion That kind of becomes our roadmap for saying this is what you can use and it s also what can be used on you by media professionals whether they are managing a campaign or selling a product These are the techniques and they vary in sophistication and what can you pull out What can you start to see We develop a whole to use a war metaphor we develop a whole battalion a whole army of conscientious media consumer who are then never watching

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  • Good Radio Shows: Episodes 2014

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    for the city of Manassas He s chairman of the theater department at George Mason University in nearby Fairfax Virginia KEN ELSTON It s a far reaching sort of epic outdoor piece that is part theater part spectacle part halftime show Elston s historical theater troupe Footsteps in Time recreated the unprecedented reunion of veterans from north and south who came together in Manassas on july 21st 1911 50 years to the day after the first major land battle of the Civil War for a celebration of peace and national unity KEN ELSTON With the possible exception of the Persian Wars this is the first time in recorded history that former enemies met on the same battlefield where they once met in mortal combat to affirm peace And that s pretty exciting When you look at the history of the world the U S is unique for a lot of reasons One of those reasons is that we had this terrible four year struggle of the American Civil War and came out of it a stronger nation You now I m from Philadelphia and in Philadelphia we always celebrate the birth of a nation 1776 And it seems to me that here in Manassas Virginia we celebrate the rebirth of a nation ED CLARK I think one of the stories that is sometimes lost at Manassas because the battle being the first battle grabs the nation s attention is this story of reconciliation It s a story Manassas National Battlefield Park superintendent Ed Clark doesn t get to tell as often as he d like ED CLARK Both sides taking up their previous positions and marching across the field instead of this time not in anger and not with bloodshed on their mind but with peace and reconciliation in their mind and instead of meeting with arms they met with handshakes And a very moving and stirring and very meaningful to those veterans More about how the 1911 Peace Jubilee came to be in a few moments But first to appreciate how extraordinary the event was you have to understand what happened during the First Battle of Manassas or Bull Run as it s also known 50 years earlier DRUMS UP AND UNDER ED CLARK At the beginning of the Civil War after Lincoln is elected and Fort Sumter occurs and he calls all the troops I think there was great excitement in both the North and the South for what was coming They ended up meeting here as they said at the time on the plains of Manassas And what both sides endured on that day on that July 21st day shocked the nation CANNON BATTLE SOUNDS KEN ELSTON Families brought their children and their picnic lunches from as far away as DC to sit and watch the spectacle of overwhelming force from the North taking on the ragged band from the South or the plantation owners here believing that the show of southern pride and dedication to state and this new idea of the new Confederate states of America would overwhelm the forces of the Union Certainly no one believed in their heart of hearts at least these people with their picnic lunches that Americans would be killing Americans right in front of their eyes ED CLARK What ended up in a very resounding Confederate victory and humiliating Union defeat shocked the nation This was up until that time in American history the bloodiest day the largest number of casualties in all of American history and it really deflated the notion that this was going to be a glorious quick and relatively bloodless war ED CLARK Soldiers were pining to be there They were afraid that if they missed this one battle they would miss the entire war But when you read those accounts of the soldiers who were there that time and you go back through their diaries and read their letters the tenor of those comments and their perspective changes dramatically And the sights that they witnessed and that they retell really shows how deeply that experience affected those soldiers George Carr Round the Union officer who proclaimed peace with his signal rockets in Raleigh at the end of the war was not at the first battle of Manassas although he too was profoundly affected by his experiences throughout the conflict He was stationed in Manassas for a while later in the war to defend the strategic railroad junction Round became a lawyer in New York and returned to settle in Manassas in 1868 Although some of the locals dismissed him as a carpetbagger at first Round became a pillar of the community KEN ELSTON He named the streets So we re at the corner of Grant and Lee We re at the corner of Grant and Lee so that the two would forever meet in peaceful accord That was very important to him The inscription on his tombstone at Arlington National Cemetery hails Round as the originator of the Peace Jubilee but the idea for the event actually came from D H Russell who was among the last confederate troops to surrender in Greensboro Russell was wounded at first Manassas After the war he became a newspaper editor and civic leader in Anderson South Carolina On January 2 1911 Russell wrote a letter to the editor of the Washington post Bob Root reads from that letter BOB ROOT The 21st day of next July will be the 50th anniversary of the first battle of Manassas and it has occurred to me that it would be a gracious thing and tending to promote peace and good feeling if Congress would make an appropriation to bring together in a national encampment on that celebrated field the survivors of both armies who actually participated in the battle It would be a spectacle that could not take place in any other country on the globe and would have a good effect in promoting the rising tide of peace and

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    trying to get to the other side of the shore and it doesn t matter what boat you get in you just get in and you go and you ll get there as long as you try as long as you re paddling In my personal and professional life I m not so concerned about which boat people get into just the fact that they don t try to overturn the ones next to them So that s really the most important concept is this notion of acceptance not just tolerating enduring and putting up with other people but accepting them and looking over at them in the other boat and being like Hey how are you doing Are you tired Are you accomplishing what you need to accomplish It has nothing to do with my boat It has nothing to do with my journey It is just basically another human being living their life and trying to find their way Kryder Except isn t there a part of many religions that encourages followers to proselytize or to try to gain new members where we are supposed to like drag somebody else s boat over and say hey jump on my boat Mirahmadi Well in Islam we do have a notion of proselytizing but no compulsion It s like saying that we think we have a nicer boat and saying well we have a motor and you re paddling Don t you want a motorized boat instead of a paddle So it s this notion of trying to bring people to what we believe is a better product or a better path but there cannot be compulsion in that so it s a really fine line between educating people about an alternative and forcing them to accept that alternative I don t think it s really a Jewish phenomenon It s mostly Christian and Muslim s having that understanding that you can preach the word of God and helping to bring people to that word but you can t shove it down their throat and I think that s important for both our communities to be wary of Kryder Hedieh what one or two action items or just suggestions maybe to reflect on can you offer to our listeners around this really big issue of interfaith tolerance Mirahmadi Get to know your Muslim neighbors Attend a local Mosque Find out how you can feed the homeless together celebrate Thanksgiving together We re hoping in our International Cultural Center to do a Thanksgiving promotion where we ask people to spend Thanksgiving with people that they don t normally break bread with I think again as I mentioned earlier the notions of what it means to be American needs to be people of all faiths and I would like to see people reaching beyond their own doors and their own communities to get to know people of other faiths and other traditions So that s an important action item to me And to respond to media in a very simple way when you see an article that you think is truly offensive to people of any faith send a comment blog about it Facebook about it that you dislike the article that it was offensive and it was inappropriate Write to CNN when you think a piece is inappropriate I think if we start to challenge the media to be a little more responsible they may listen Nurit Peled Elhanan talks with Peace Talks Radio host Suzanne Kryder Suzanne Kryder You ve used the word heterophobia Talk about that What is that Nurit Peled Elhanan Heterophobia is a phobia from strangers It s the fear of strangers I used it because I think you become racist when you don t know anything about the other and then you become very afraid phobic about the other and then you become hateful and aggressive towards the other I believe that in Israel and also in America people are educated in heterophobia the other the horrible other the Muslim masses those blacks those yellows and it is all a product really of ignorance and of course of political motivations but which enhance ignorance and lack of communication of free communication with the other and that leads to racism Kryder What do you see as a solution to that Elhanan Well I think the solution of course is in education because I don t think children are born racist or heterophobic I ll give you an example I was on sabbatical in London several times and I could see my son s classes He was in a neighborhood school and there were many many children from many countries and faiths and nationalities Every nationality that was represented in the class was studied and the class went to all the prayer houses of everybody and they learned the history of everybody and a little bit about the writings of everybody about the blessings of everybody I never heard any child calling the other or referring to another by this black guy this Arab guy this Chinese I want to go to my Chinese friend It never happened They all had first names and that was it and I was amazed by it because it shows that children normally accept other people They don t care about differences Racism is really the product of a very profound thorough and sophisticated education so we can do the other way around if we want to Kryder But when do we need to get started on that because if children don t have it naturally at what point do young adults or adults take it on and own it and what can we do about that Elhanan I think children are educated in their homes from a very very tender age to see the other as negative stereotypes we and them and we are better than them we are white they are black and so on and so forth So they

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    and the pity of war The poetry is in the pity All a poet can do today is warn and that is why true poets must be truthful I often wonder if Britten was familiar with this comment and if he saw his urgent need for pacifism his need to take a stand against war if he saw the need for composers and artists to take social and political stands with their work so that their artistic work would make a difference Jane Ellen talks with Peace Talks Radio host Paul Ingles about Tippett s A Child of Our Time Ellen And then we move to yet another British composer Michael Tippett who would serve jail time for his stand on pacifism during World War II He had lifelong humanitarian and pacifist beliefs which were simply unshakeable and it led him to make a personal statement during 1943 saying that no artist should ever be conscripted or forced to serve any sort of military time Part of this was as a way of declaring his status as a conscientious objector He was 38 years old at the time and really not due to be called up for military service but to accept that official statement he would have had to give up his current teaching job as well as have other things taken away from him by taking this lower status as a conscientious objector Friends of his encouraged him not to do this that it was silly it was senseless he was too old to serve anyway but he insisted on making the statement and because of this he was actually thrown into jail and served three months Tippett was also the first openly gay composer so he was very much a controversial figure both socially and musically He would push the boundaries a bit further when he decided to write an oratorio in which he would musically make his statements about the need for peace by using African American spirituals in the context of 20th century classical music being written by an Englishman The piece he chose to write he would title A Child of Our Time and it was influenced by actual political events A polish teenager who was only 17 years old had been sent to Paris by his Jewish family in 1938 hoping to keep him safe When he found that his family had been deported by the Nazis to Poland fearing for their safety and in anger over the entire situation this teenager shot a German diplomat All of this set in motion a terrible event called Kristallnacht in which Nazis tore apart Jewish shops and the homes of Jews in protest for the murder of one of their own Not many people recognized that this refuge teenager was actually the child of our time about whom Tippett was going to write Ingles So from A Child of Our Time what would like us to hear Ellen I can t resist choosing one of

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    U S Vietnam War Veterans Al Plapp and Tommy Laughlin who both went back to Vietnam on a healing journey with Soldier s Heart Carol Boss Al did you ever think about returning to Vietnam I m interested in your reasons for why you would want to return Al Plapp Well I d always wondered about the people I had a picture of a little girl on my wall every since I came back that I d taken over there that I fell in love with at the orphanage where I worked at I named her Sarah So I always had that on my wall to think about the people About four years ago I met Dr Tick and Kate and Dr Fisher at a conference and they were speaking about this journey back and when I heard that I thought I ve got to do it I ve got to go back I talked to my wife about it and we agreed and last October we went back Boss What motivated you Plapp Primarily because I wanted to reconnect with the people I wanted to reconnect with the culture I still am and was at that time confused about our own culture I couldn t understand all the aggression that we have here all the anger that we have here that they didn t have over there even during war When I returned over there they were the same They don t have the anger they don t have the PTSD The culture shock was coming back here not going there Boss Tommy had you had thoughts about returning to Vietnam Tommy Laughlin Not for many many years decades People started going back I think in the 90s veterans started going back and that evolved I thought about it When I was over there in 67 I recognized it as a very beautiful place Even though we might have considered it Third World I thought it was beautiful I thought the people were very clean and industrious I didn t really think that it required a lot of change But in any case I was taken by the beauty of it despite the circumstances In that sense I always thought it would be a nice place to be a tourist in peace time But after people started going back you still have the anxiety and that fear You spent basically a year in a dangerous situation so I couldn t really conceive of going back without being armed until I went to a workshop with Dr Ed Tick He had what he terms a spiritual approach to recovery from these issues I had recognized during some of my hospital stays at the VA the spiritual side of me and probably others as well wasn t being addressed at all and I went looking for help in the hospital spiritually Even though I don t have a faith base or a particular religion I recognized there was something lacking there

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    military activity from that measure If the U S were no advance we estimate it would be 1 8 trillion Kryder So Clyde let s take this down to the individual level and think about the average listener for our program What can they do Are there any behavior changes they can make in terms of making the United States more peaceful McConaghy Keep your kids at school longer is number one because the level of enrollment in high school is one of the strongest correlating drivers correlating relationship drivers between peace and society So it s not whether or not they go to tertiary institutions and university and college it s actually how long kids stay at school That s probably number one Number two that actually is a very very strong driver maybe not at the domestic level with your neighbor but is corruption in society which is not a big factor in the U S as it is in many many other countries but that s actually a very very strong driver for a lack of peacefulness as well But the other thing is and your point is a good one that it is bringing it down to the local level It s getting on with literally your neighbor across the fence a little bit differently and actually starting at you could say peace begins at home So if peace begins at home within the home then with your immediate neighbors then with your suburbs and then with your football teams and that sort of thing so the degree of cohesion And at a global level we measure the relationships of neighboring countries Indeed at a local level we know that the relationships with neighboring people and indeed other multicultural groups within society does actually make for a more peaceful society Clyde McConaghy Bio Clyde McConaghy is a Board Director for the Institute for Economics Peace and has been involved with the development of the Global Peace Index since its inception in 2007 He is group managing director of a group of publicly listed and private companies in the technology film making venture capital and charity sectors He is a board director of an Australian Stock Exchange listed technology company and has served as a board director on a London Stock Exchange listed company in the field of global business analysis Clyde McConaghy has two decades of global business management experience holds two university degrees Bachelor of Business The Cranfield MBA and has lived in Australia Germany China and the United Kingdom Peace Talks Radio host Suzanne Kryder talks with Steve Killelea Founder of the Institute for Economics and Peace Suzanne Kryder Steve you ve created enormously successful businesses Why should business care about peace Steve Killelea Business needs to care about peace because I think in many ways it s a lost dimension of one of the things which affect its markets For example we ve done work which has analyzed the global economy and what we found from that is that if we look at last year 2010 8 trillion were lost through violence Now it s very very hard to imagine a world which is actually 100 peaceful but I think we could all imagine a world which is let s say 25 more peaceful and that would equate to 2 trillion Now just to try and put that into some sort of perspective that would be enough to pay off Greece Ireland Portugal s debt It would be enough to fund the carbon emissions the 20 by 2020 carbon emissions which the EU is after It would also be enough to pay the Millennium Development Goals and also leave 1 trillion over for additional economic expansion Now if we look at that and analyze that further and look what would the impact of that be on the U S economy it s approximately 1 4 trillion just for the U S economy alone Kryder Isn t there sort of an underlying belief that war is good for the economy though Killelea War is good for some sections of the economy in just the same way as crime is also good for some sections of the economy There are other parts of the economy which suffer substantial losses from war or from violence Now this is not to say that let s make a moral judgment that we don t need police or that we don t need an army We certainly need a strong robust army but the question is what is the size and what is it trying to accomplish Kryder President Eisenhower talked about a Military Industrial Complex that a lot of the economy was building up around the military What s your vision of a peace industrial economy How could we develop that Killelea Well we came up with a concept of the peace industries and we all know what the Military Industrial complex is A lot of people know the size of it and its relevance to the economy even the major companies within it but if I talk to you about peace industries well most people would start to think about maybe some NGOs maybe some Buddhist monks selling incense or something like that but actually peace industries are all those companies and businesses whose markets actually expand with increasing peacefulness and whose cost structures decrease Now we did a survey with the UN Global Compact and they did a survey of their Chief Executive Officers and CFOs who were members and they ve got some thousands as members in the survey sample 80 believed the size of their markets increase with increased peacefulness and 79 believed their costs actually decreased as you increase peace Kryder Why would the costs decrease Killelea Well there s a whole lot of inherent friction trapped in an economy because of violence I ll just give you a couple of really classic examples One we ll think about shopping Now if you

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2011 Episodes
    a disagreement with someone I had a tendency to start the discussion with poking my finger in their chest and look you SOB and oddly enough that very seldom resulted in a satisfactory result Through AVP I learned I can t say I learned but it made me aware that if I start the conversation with looking for a solution rather than a victory that I was more likely to find a solution Boss Were you able to then practice the skills that you learned and developed in the workshops Were you able to actually use them in the prison itself Irons Yeah Like most things that we learn it takes practice I didn t leave the first workshop all cured and all better but I learned some techniques and it made me aware of the need to approach things differently Boss What did you think for the first time Alex when you went to a workshop or one of those groups Did you think hey that s for me I want to be a part of this James Alexander I could not believe that people actually cared about people in prison When you find someone to treat you like a human being not like you are just someone to be thrown away it has an impact on you Carol and it had a great impact on me Boss What would you say was one of the more valuable skills that you learned and were able to use Alexander I would actually say assertive communication Boss Can you explain that Alexander Well being able to stand or sit across from an individual look them in the eye and understand that they are not your superior as far as being better than you Just because they may have more money in their bank account they may have a better suit and tie they may know how to shoot a basketball like Michael Jordan or say a speech like President Obama it doesn t mean that they are a better human being than you are So if you start from the place that you are equal with the person you re talking to and you are valued just as they are valued you are loved just as they are loved by their family and friends if you enter into a conversation from that perspective it s difficult to be angry to be violent not to hear that other person Boss What were some of the things that you saw and heard at the very beginning that most struck you along with the fact that you couldn t believe people could care so much about people in prison Alexander For me it was the exercises where you learn about the different triggers or things that you know get people angry I ve been out of prison for two months and I see anger as I m driving on a highway I drive kind of slowly now because I really respect and value human

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL98_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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