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  • Concert For Peace Talks
    Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez declared it Peace Talks Day in the city A splendid time was had by all Mary Gauthier Bill Miller and Tish Hinojosa in an All Star finale on Bob Dylan s Knocking on Heaven s Door Mary Gauthier Find out more about Mary at www marygauthier com Bill Miller Visit Bill online at www billmiller net Tish Hinojosa www mundotish com Emcee Paul Ingles Mary Oishi Performs Her Poem Read the text here Don McIver and Gary Glazner perform Give Peace A Chance Tish Hinojosa Mary Gauthier Bill Miller w Carol Boss of Peace Talks City Administrator James Lewis reads the proclamation from Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez declaring it Peace Talks Day Tish Hinojosa Onstage Jon Ghahate Holly Kawakami Richard Mahler and Mary Gauthier at the CD Sales Table in the Kimo Lobby Part of the Kimo Theatre Crowd Mary Bill doing Dylan and Tish Special Thanks to others who donated their time and talent Simon Welter Mimi Peavey Todd Lovato Richard Mahler Rosemarie Deleo Gerri Rodriguez Joanna Garcia Sahreem Luergan Jana Murphy Rogi Riverstone Marilyn Brown Jessica Carr David Hughes Mel Schneider Chris Gelina Nancy Arnold Bekka Martin Rhoda Weill Sarah Malone John Ghahate Nick

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/Concert.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Gallery
    The program featured media analysts and news professionals discussing the role local broadcast media play in informing citizens so they can participate in the democracy ALL PANEL PHOTOS BY GREG JOHNSTON Th e Panel on Radio News included from left Bob McCannon of the New Mexico Media Literacy Project Marcos Martinez of public radio KUNM in Albuquerque moderator Paul Ingles Wally Dean of the Committee of Concerned Journalists and Jayne Bower of WWJ Newsradio 950 in Detroit Before the taping Moderator Paul Ingles right gives some instructions to from left Bob McCannon of the New Mexico Media Literacy Project Anthony Wilson of ABCTV11 in Durham Karen Foss from KSDK TV in St Louis Marcos Martinez of public radio KUNM in Albuquerque Jayne Bower of WWJ Newsradio 950 in Detroit and Wally Dean of the Committee of Concerned Journalists Other photos below include Bob and Anthony on the TV News Panel Wally and Karen on that same panel Moderator Paul Ingles the view from the crowd and the view on stage Over 150 people attended the taping The resulting program was made available to all public radio stations to broadcast More information at www paulingles com democracy shtml Suzanne Kryder is

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/gallery.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Southwest Storytellers
    also share a common interest in the magic and mythology of the American Southwest Their novels stories and plays are grounded in the particulars of place steeped in the landscape and in the ancient cultures of the region This 59 minute program is free to all public radio stations It includes highlights from the panel discussion as well as selected readings from each author s work You must notify the producer of plans to broadcast email paul at paulingles com CD copies are available Click here to hear Part 1 of the program Click here to hear Part 2 of the program Click here to hear Part 3 of the program Click here to view the transcript More on A Celebration of Southwest Storytellers Anaya Hillerman Momaday The panel featuring the three authors was a good humored freewheeling discussion of topics including How each author views his particular ethnicity contributing to his work How they feel they became such gifted storytellers How they write What projects do they have in the works How the September 11th terrorist attacks have impacted their thinking and work Excerpts Rudolfo Anaya I get asked about my inspiration and I tell them that writing is just painful to me painful And nobody wants to hear that They don t want to hear about the pain They just want to hear the trade secrets I say I don t have any trade secrets I tell them to go out and feel some pain and maybe they ll get something done Tony Hillerman jokes about how the New Mexico landscape seeps into his work One critic wrote about my work Hillerman s novels are pretty good in ways but every time you think something s about to happen he stops and describes a cloud Scott Momaday on

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/storyteller1.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Southwest Storytellers
    the major literary traditions of New Mexico the Chicano the Native American and Anglo In their writings Chávez McGarrity and Ortiz are literary realists who depict the many cultures of the Southwest autobiographically authentically and in detail Through their many novels stories plays and poems they celebrate the local landscape and customs of the people and they emphasize the importance of family and unspoiled nature as stays against confusion For this event Jemez Springs resident and Pulitzer prize winner N Scott Momaday served as moderator Hear each author talk about the major themes in their work and respond to audience questions in this engaging 59 minte program Both Ortiz and Chavez read samples of their work while the producers read from McGarrity Bios Denise Chavez Born in Las Cruces New Mexico in 1948 playwright and novelist Denise Chávez studied acting and playwriting at New Mexico State University and the University of New Mexico She is best known for her often anthologized and semi autobiographical short story cycle The Last of the Menu Girls which received the Puerto del Sol Fiction Award in 1966 and for her novel Face of an Ange l which received an American Book Award in 1994 Michael McGarrity The author of eight police procedural novels in the Kevin Kerney series including the Anthony Award nominated Tularosa and the recent Everyone Dies A trained psychotherapist he was recognized as New Mexico Social Worker of the Year in 1980 An honor graduate of the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy and a former deputy sheriff he was honored as Santa Fe s Officer of the Year in 1987 Simon Ortiz Born in 1941 and raised at the Pueblo of Acoma west of Albuquerque Simon Ortiz completed an MFA at the University of Iowa in 1969 He received the 1981

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/storyteller2.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Southwest Storytellers
    struggles over collective memory as they explore the alternative narratives and cultural connections that have evolved out of their respective communities and histories Like the previous two panels says producer Paul Ingles this one was casual and good natured I think listeners who enjoy these authors and even those who haven t read them yet will be intrigued with the discussion The program was recorded by Nola Daves Moses N Scott Momaday was moderator at the original event Judy Goldberg hosts the radio special University of New Mexico English professor Dr Elizabeth Archuleta collaborated with Ingles to write the script The program was produced by Albuquerque s Good Radio Shows Inc with support from the New Mexico Humanities Council and KUNM Good Radio Shows Inc is a non profit media organization which produces programs to inspire inform and improve the human condition To find out how you can help support these programs visit www goodradioshows org Bios Demetria Martínez was born in Albuquerque and raised by her parents and grandmother in Tucson Arizona She has worked as a free lance journalist but she is best known for her novel Mother Tongue which won the 1994 Western States Award for Fiction She has also written several books of poetry the latest being Breathing between the Lines Her journalism has covered controversial issues such as abortion and immigration and her creative writing continues to include strong political messages Rina Naranjo Swentzell was born in Santa Clara Pueblo New Mexico in 1939 She is the older sister of well known modern sculptor and poet Nora Naranjo Morse as well as the mother of celebrated potter Roxanne Swentzell Her work includes a children s book Children of Clay A Family of Pueblo Potters and her writing also appears in magazines scholarly journals and edited

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/storyteller3.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Top Stories
    the shelter that had taken him in a 7 year old was having trouble with his 2 year old brother a Vietnamese woman was struggling with an impending arranged marriage We strung these short stories together with little narration or editing and well people seemed to like it After the first show we were flooded with positive calls some saying we should do it regularly We were able to do one more but lack of funding forced us to put the project on hold Thanks to a grant from the City of Albuquerque s Urban Enhancement Trust Fund Our Top Stories returned in 2004 We re brought together 4 students and 4 community volunteers matched them with professional trainers and taught them how to do the interviews and the editing to create the final programs Click on a show to hear it in RealAudio Show 1 Show 2 Show 3 Show 4 Show 5 Show 6 Show 7 Show 8 Show 9 Show 10 KUNM News Director Marcos Martinez shows trainees a video on interviewing Our student staff Kimani Nagurski New Futures High Nick Kerwin Sandia High Damien Flo res Albuquerque High Kimberly Kreitinger La Cueva High Our community volunteers Julie Jordan Bob Davey Carol Boss Jamila Davey Rogi Riverstone Kenna Josephene Along with trainers Paul Ingles Todd Lovato Tristan Clum and Marcos Martinez we created 8 shows in 2004 5 Here s one recent response from a listener This show was fantastic There was a disclaimer of sorts at the beginning which said that this was not going to be the equivalent of the riveting mass media news and boy were you right This was so much better When I listen to mass media news I try hard to only listen with partial attention I want the highlights and

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/TopStories.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • PRN PeaceTalks Radio Schedule
    Radio Special 1 8 2009 Peace Talks Radio Special 1 15 Martin Luther King Jr s Path to Nonviolence 1 22 Peaceful Parenting PART 1 PART 2 1 29 Native Wisdom in Parenting and Peacemaking PART ONE PART TWO 2 5 Crime Punishment and Forgiveness PART 1 PART 2 2 12 Peacemaking Through Arts and Parks in Neighborhoods 2 19 The Peacemaking Challenge of the Rainbow Gatherings 2 26 New Episode To Be Determined From Sept 09 3 5 New Episode To Be Determined From Oct 09 3 12 New Episode To Be Determined From Nov 09 3 19 New Episode To Be Determined From Jan 10 3 26 Youth Mediation and Anti Bullying Programs 3 20 PART 1 PART 2 4 2 New Episode To Be Determined From Feb 10 4 9 Making Peace With Ourselves in Troubled Times 4 16 New Episode To Be Determined From March 10 4 23 The Dalai Lama in Seattle 2008 4 30 The Peace Message of Star Trek 5 7 New Episode To Be Determined From April 10 5 14 2003 Peace Talks Radio Special 5 21 Nonviolent Communication with Marshall Rosenberg 5 28 Taken Too Soon The Cost of War Memorial Day Special 6 4 New Episode To Be Determined From May 10 6 11 Reducing Consumer Conflict and Workplace Conflict PART 1 PART 2 6 18 2007 Peace Talks Radio Special 6 25 New Episode To Be Determined from June 10 2009 Episodes 6 19 The Dalai Lama in Our Time 6 26 The Neuroscience of Compassion 7 3 John Lennon and Yoko Ono s Peace Work 7 10 Creative Nonviolent Actions for Peace 7 17 Ralph Bunche A Profile in Peace 7 24 Climate Change and Conflict 8 7 Peacemaking Elders PART 1 PART 2 8 14 Teaching Peace

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/PRNSchedule.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes
    brought it abreast as scientific realism The abolition of war is no longer an ethical question to be pondered solely by learned philosophers and ecclesiastics but a hardcore one for the decision of the masses whose survival is the issue Kryder Paul what about the General MacArthur quote is important to you Chappell Basically what he is saying is that the issue of ending war is now an issue of human survival If you look at the struggle to achieve women s rights or the struggle to achieve civil rights or the struggle to abolish slavery those were very important issues but the world wasn t going to end if slavery wasn t abolished The world wasn t going to end if civil rights or women s rights weren t achieved But the issues we re dealing with now war nuclear weapons environmental destruction these issues threaten human survival So we have to act with increased urgency and determination to solve these problems in a very timely way Kryder Paul it seems like some anti war folks have an attitude that any soldier anybody who serves in the military is pro war and what their purpose and their inner motivation is to seek war What s your take on that Chappell Well I think that people in power control people by dividing people People in power want people in the peace movement to see the soldiers and the military as enemies They want people in the military to see the peace movement as enemies They want liberals to see republicans as enemies and conservatives to see liberals as enemies One thing I realized is how much all these people really have in common I think that I am an example of somebody who joined the military and I know many people who joined the military thinking that the military is going to make the world safer and the military is going to promote peace If you look at President Bush or President Obama they both say that the military is promoting freedom and the military is promoting democracy and the military is making the world safer If you look at WWII when recruitment was very high when people were eagerly being drafted you had this sense that people in the military were going to defeat Hitler and defeat Imperial Japan and create world peace The military if you look at their whole recruiting strategy they never say you have to kill anybody If you look at the Navy s new motto it s A global force for good If you look at how they recruit they recruit appealing to people s ideals and appealing to people s yearning for self improvement getting disciplined getting college money The problem with appealing to people s ideals is you get a lot of people in your organization who are idealistic So a lot of people in the military join thinking they re going to make the world safer They re going to help the women in Afghanistan They re going to help the people in Iraq Certainly not all of the people in the military join with those kinds of intentions Like any large organization you have people with bad motives But if you recognize what many of their intentions are we have to offer a better security paradigm We have to offer a better way to make the country and the planet safe without using war because war in many ways is a very old archaic and counterproductive method If you look at the New Zealand Army for example they perform missions of humanitarian aid disaster relief and protecting animals from poachers If the purpose of the American military is to protect the American people the best way to protect the American people is to help people around the world through natural disaster relief through humanitarian relief humanitarian aid and those kinds of things If you look at how the military is now if you get rid of the military you ll end up with basically private armies There are people right now who want the military to become completely privatized If you look at Blackwater The Rise of the World s Most Powerful Mercenary Army the change in how war is waged where we have more civilian contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan than actual soldiers You could imagine a very dangerous situation where the military actually becomes privatized If we had a draft right now we wouldn t be in any wars in the Middle East or if we were there would be vast public opposition and that is exactly why there is no draft The people who waged war realized that if you have a draft in the 21st century Americans are really going to start wondering about this whole war system So to summarize I would say that I am an example and there are many examples of soldiers that I know who have good intentions and that s a chance for peace people to actually reach out to them and dialogue with them In addition to that we have to offer a new security paradigm a new way to make our country safe that is more effective and less counterproductive than more Kryder Paul your book describes seven muscles that we need develop in order to end war The muscles are like weapons of peace They are hope empathy appreciation conscience reason discipline and curiosity With empathy if we think about our listeners let s say they want to dedicate four hours on a Saturday afternoon to ending war What are two specific action steps they could do to strengthen the muscle of empathy Chappell I think that empathy has to be strengthened through training and through practice I think that so much of the dialogue in our country is very divisive and polarizing and demonizing of each side One thing I explain to people especially when I do peace leadership training is try to imagine yourself talking to somebody who has the complete opposite viewpoint of you How would you have empathy for that person How would you not get angry How would you not lose your temper How would you even have empathy That s a very difficult thing to do especially when you re talking about very controversial issues That s what King and Gandhi and Nelson Madela and others were able to do so well One thing I say just a practical thing people can do is if you re talking to anybody who has the opposing viewpoint it is so important to listen and be respectful If all you do is listen and be respectful that is an important victory I don t think there has ever been anyone in human history who has seriously said I hate it when people listen to me I hate it when people respect me I can t stand it when people listen to me or respect me Everybody likes to be listened to Everybody likes to be respected So when you listen to people and you are respectful you make a very strong impression on them especially in a culture like ours where there is so little respect and so little listening If you listen to somebody about a controversial issue like war you have one viewpoint they have the opposite viewpoint and if you listen to that person they ll walk away from the conversation and they might say wow those peace people we don t see eye to eye but they are really nice people That person actually listened to me My own wife doesn t listen to me My children don t listen to me Nobody listens to me Kryder I get what you mean by listening I can see people listening Break it down What is being respectful What are our listeners doing or not doing Chappell Well that s what I m trying to get to is basically is people ask me then How do you listen to people The key to listening is you have to have empathy If you don t have empathy for somebody you can t really hear what they re saying Even if the person has the most outrageous viewpoint you can imagine if you empathize with the person that s when you begin to understand where they re coming from If you look at Martin Luther King Jr he was getting dozens of death threats a day his house was bombed he was arrested multiple times he was eventually killed but you never saw him talk about the people who were pressing him in this demonizing dehumanizing way that you see liberals talk about conservatives and vice versa He had much more right to demonize his opponents If you look at Frederick Douglas who came out of slavery you didn t hear him using that demonizing dehumanizing language of white people If you look at Gandhi how he talked about the British he didn t talk about the British in this demonizing way Of course he had much more right to because look at the conditions he was living in Look at the conditions that King was living in or look at Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela was in jail for 27 years and he was actually able to win the hearts and minds of some of his prison guards through having a respectful attitude towards them The thing about waging peace is that you respect them as a human being and you recognize that in this struggle your opponent is ignorant your opponent is hatred your opponent is greed your opponent is misunderstanding You want to attack their hatred and defeat it You want to attack their ignorance You want to attack their misunderstandings How do you do that effectively If you hate them back or if you demonize them you actually magnify their hatred By respecting them it opens a doorway where you can directly attack their hatred and attack their ignorance You can t convert everybody from that opposing point of view but as King and Mandela and Frederick Douglas and Susan B Anthony and many others showed you can convert quite a number and enough to create critical mass in how people think Peace Talks Radio Host Suzanne Kryder talks with former soldier Erik Gustafson founder of EPIC The Education for Peace in Iraq Center Kryder Was there anything in your experience serving in the military that changed how you viewed war and peace and maybe could have been a precursor to the work since you ve done since then Gustafson Well absolutely I mean it was the 91 Gulf War I know a lot of people celebrate Colin Powell and the Powell Doctrine because Americans came home and we lost very few guys in that war Of the guys that we lost it was mostly from friendly fire incidents or from accidents vehicle accidents and things like that It is a good thing that so few Americans died in the 91 Gulf War but I saw the other side of the Powell Doctrine and that was the number of Iraqis who were killed You had a dictatorship You had conscripts These were Iraqis who didn t choose to serve they had to serve They were deployed It they had gone against their orders they would have been killed and they were in Kuwait and then with the U S military coming in with overwhelming firepower 42 days of a very intensive air war that killed so many Iraqis that probably given the opportunity would have turned and fled One of the worse cases was seeing the aftermath of the Highway of Death This was the exodus of the Iraqi military out of Kuwait when they expected an amphibious assault and also when the ground forces moved in That exodus on that highway I forget what the highway is but the highway between Kuwait City going back to Basra was just completely almost every vehicle was destroyed and an unknown number of Iraqis died when they were leaving when they were in retreat That to me always bothered me and it really told me that sometimes decisions made at the highest level can have terrible consequences for so many in terms of costing lives Kryder We re speaking with Erik Gustafson Erik tell us what you ve done since your military service around promoting peace Gustafson Well when I got out of the service I went on to the University of Wisconsin in Madison and became an activist on a lot of human rights issues For years I mostly focused on East Timor But then in the summer of 1997 I had an opportunity to travel to Iraq on a humanitarian fact finding mission and what I witnessed firsthand was a war that had never really ended With the cease fire agreement in 1991 Saddam Hussein s regime was left intact left in power The agreement with the UN was that he had to completely eliminate his weapons of mass destruction program but there was no way to completely verify that he had done so International sanctions remained in place and those sanctions were doing far more to harm ordinary Iraqis than they were harming the regime or compelling it to come clean with the UN What I saw was basically a war that had gone from the frontlines of traditional battlefields into people s homes into hospitals into the streets and cities of Iraq affecting ordinary civilians while the regime was able to consolidate power and stay in power because the people became so much more dependent on the regime I just saw what I felt was a terrible policy and so that compelled me when I came back from that mission to go on the lecture tour talk with Americans as a veteran of the 91 Gulf War and try to get Americans to recognize that the conflict wasn t over that there was still a price being paid by ordinary Iraqis and that fundamental changes needed to happen in U S policy After that I ended up moving to Washington D C and I formed the Education for Peace in Iraq Center in 1998 with the mission of improving humanitarian conditions for all Iraqis and bringing an end to conflict there Kryder The acronym is EPIC Education for Peace in Iraq Center In full disclosure that s how you and I met I was here in 2005 and volunteered to work with EPIC for a month Where did the germ where did the seed of this idea for EPIC come from Gustafson My approach to the work has always been through solidarity work I think for me a lot of my political socialization happened as an activist on the campus at the U of W in Madison Certainly I formed some of my views when I was in the service and even before then but I think a lot of my views about how to effect social change came together as an activist at Madison Because of my experience with East Timor Action Network I saw how effective only a dozen chapters of activists scattered around the country and how much of an impact that small network could have on U S policy when it came to Indonesia and East Timor I wanted to be able to apply the same lessons to creating social change around U S Iraq policy That s really where the idea came from My ideas about solidarity work is that part of it is that if you want to be effective you have to know how to create change in Washington D C but secondly you have to always stay in contact with the people who your mission serves In this case it was the people of Iraq I ve always spent time developing and forming friendships with the Iraqi Diaspora Iraqi Americans here but also always looking at opportunities to get to know Iraqis in Iraq as well What they share with me has always informed the work that we do Kryder Tell us about a success in Washington in terms of your advocacy work Gustafson Well one of the early successes we had was to get the story of the humanitarian crisis under international sanctions in the regime into newspapers There was a complete blackout In fact The New York Times refused to run any of these stories that looked at the humanitarian consequences of international sanctions There was an editorial decision made at the highest level that it was because of the regime not because of international sanctions so they flat out refused My twin brother Jeff wrote a letter to The New York Times shortly after a UNICEF report came out that basically said that between 1991 and 1998 there were as many excess deaths among children under the age of five as 500 000 That was the upward estimate that UNICEF was making at the time He wrote a letter to The New York Times The letter editor actually changed his letter and attributed that statistic to Saddam Hussein s regime and ran the letter that way We immediately activated our base and just put enormous pressure on The New York Times to publish a correction and eventually they agreed to run a new letter without changing it so we were able to get that letter in Not too long after Stephen Kinzer ran a series of three stories about the humanitarian situation in Iraq It was the first time that we finally broke through that wall and we started to get stories about the humanitarian situation At the same time Denis Halliday resigned from the UN He was in charge of the Oil for Food program in Iraq and we worked with other groups here in Washington to have him testify The combination of that and other things actually led to the Clinton Administration raising the cap on

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL107_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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