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  • Neighborhood Peacemaking
    their points of view However people usually do really want to vent I do what we call caucusing I ll speak with one side privately the other side sits say in another room Then the second party gets to speak with me too So the venting can occur but the wall doesn t go up between the two people who are trying to work out a solution INGLES What is the success rate in this type of mediation Is there follow up that you can track BENINATO Yes because often I ll tell people if it s not working if you don t think that the agreement that the parties came to is being followed they can call me up and we ll do a follow up session I ve had some follow up sessions but not a lot INGLES If you were trying to talk with folks and imagine a scenario where the neighbor could approach another neighbor and start working this out on their own without calling in a complaint and working out a mediation what tips would you have BENINATO You might try a phone call but if you ve been up all night and you re really upset it s probably not the best time to do it Although you could just say I would like to talk to you about your dog Leave your number your name identify where you live in relationship to the neighbor If they never call you back maybe you d like to write them a very short letter saying I am being disturbed by your dog I would like to talk to you about this so that we could work something out so that we can both live here peacefully Give your contact information and see if the neighbor responds to that INGLES Before you are even exposed to annoyances that might bother you it s important to get to know your neighbors It seems rather simple but does that really help when things like this come up You have a path that isn t blocked by fear or assumptions that you build in your head BENINATO I think that is also a very good idea Try to meet your neighbors whether you see them walking down the street and can introduce yourself or whether you ve just moved into the neighborhood and you make an effort to go to say everybody surrounding you and say Hey I m the new neighbor and I d just like to introduce myself You can open the door so they know who you are The first impression is not of somebody who is coming because they re having a problem but because they really want to get to know you and be part of the neighborhood 0 According to our next guests addressing conflict in our neighborhoods and making them more peaceful places requires patience persistence empathy creative consensus building skills and a willingness to overcome our indifference about the place where we

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL40.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Taken Too Soon: The Cost of War
    like this that has acknowledged the loss of life among civilians contractors and journalists along side of military casualties says Ingles I just felt it was important that people marking Memorial Day in the U S take a moment to contemplate a roll call that goes beyond just our own country s loss All most Americans have heard is that 15 8 30 Iraqis died in a certain incident on a given day These people had names and families just like the men and women of our armed forces It seems appropriate to me to read some of their names The hour long program will contain about 135 names meant to represent the various casualty constituencies A soldier from each state in the U S is included Ingles used Defense Department information for the names of coalition casualties Civilian contractor and journalist names were drawn from press reports and websites devoted to tracking those deaths Ingles put an email call out to members of the Association of Independents in Radio asking for volunteers to help voice the special Within a few days he d heard back from nearly 40 producers who said they d be willing to voice a couple of minutes of names for the program Since the program will consist primarily of a list of names I thought it would sound better to have a variety of voices involved adds Ingles Also I think it will create a sense of how we all are impacted by this loss of life Ingles estimates that the hour long program will contain about 135 names meant to represent the various casualty constituencies Sadly says Ingles a complete reading of names at this pace even with conservative estimates of civilian deaths would require about 400 hours TO RADIO PROGRAM DIRECTORS This program

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL39.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks - The Peace Corps at 45
    much a part of not something someone implanted and then left It was integral in the community s development process It was a wonderful feeling It was not what I was doing it was what people were motivated to do for themselves Arne Vanderburg Returned Peace Corps Volunteer DAVENPORT I went back to Thailand last year with a portion of the Peace Corps called the Crisis Corps which is designed for former Peace Corps volunteers to go back in times of crisis to the countries where they had served I went back with several others to Thailand following the tsunami I started going around a camp with a young Thai woman who was working on her Master s Degree in psychology These were families jammed into little tiny rooms thirteen feet by eighteen feet All of their possessions were on the floor The walls were terribly flimsy there was no place to hang anything I realized visiting those families that for a very small amount of money and with a little bit of effort our group could put together shelves clothes hangers simple things to help people store their belongings off the damp floor In every room in the camp we put a long eight foot shelf with a clothes rod underneath it We built cabinets and shelves I honestly had the feeling that we were doing something that in a small way made their day to day lives a lot better I felt very happy about it Jan Vanderburg Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Anna Skinner Peace Corps Volunteer In Namibia BOSS In talking today with our panel of Peace Corps volunteers they also said that it was a challenge for them to transition to a new culture How has that experience been for you especially these days when it s said that Americans abroad are not as welcomed as they once were and that safety is a concern ANNA SKINNER Peace Corps Volunteer on Duty in Namibia Africa The transition was interesting for me My site is a rather large and developed town where I had a lot of conveniences and a similar lifestyle in many ways to that which I had in the United States I do not feel that I had a lot that I personally needed to adjust to I think that served as an illusion sometimes Even though it looked and felt at times like things were something akin to what I knew on the other side of the ocean my actual work in getting to know the people and culture the way things actually operate threw me I thought this was like home but it really is not like home at all In terms of my safety how I have been perceived here as an American I have felt very welcomed I have felt nothing but curiosity inquisitive perspective from people who are meeting me I can think of two negative comments or experiences that I have had but otherwise people have welcomed me

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL37.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks: A Department of Peace?
    government to a broad based approach where we would make the work of peace a national calling and to have it brought into every area of human life And the way that you do that is to create a department that shows the significance and importance of it I mean right now the United States spends over 400 Billion a year for a department that is involved with armaments involved with aggression which is called on to protect our country but the meaning of it has been transformed of late We CAN change the awareness of the need for peace make peace an overarching concern in our society by creating a department which would inform programs at every level of society I think War in Iraq makes it more likely that there s a future for a Department of Peace because people see that our nation through its leadership has the capacity to unleash aggressive war And I think it s alarming many people when they find that a nation has a lack of anchor points to insure that the tendencies toward war are tamed at the bureaucratic and administrative levels of a government A Department of Peace would give a president options A Secretary of Peace would be in on the cabinet meetings talking about the urgency of resolving matters in a nonviolent way and coming up with programs that do just that So war s not inevitable Peace can be inevitable if we work towards it it s just that right now we re not working toward peace Our government is working toward war Heather Wilson Republican Representative from New Mexico No I don t think a Department of Peace is necessary We have a Secretary of State we have a Secretary of Defense we have the US Agency for International Development I think we probably have it covered Steve Pearce Republican Representative from New Mexico I would suspect that a Department of Peace is not going to get a lot of excitement at least on the Republican side I think that Secretary of State Powell has done a very good job of bringing the negotiations on Iraq to the point that I was comfortable that we had every initiative that would arrive at a peaceful solution here So I would be skeptical of a Department of Peace that gives the impression that we re sitting over here as military rogues trying to export capitalism Those things just aren t factual They re not true Chris Griscom founder of The Light Institute and The Nizhoni School For Global Consciousness I m not saying that we can t have laws and heads of state and structures like that we can But there cannot be peace unless we learn what it is to be human at a higher octave But you know what People are spiritual in their hearts and it s not about religions It s about life and death and connection and communication And that s the crux

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL32.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks - Nuclear Disarmament
    the old argument that if they had nuclear weapons they would not need huge armies and conventional weapons and that therefore they could reduce military spending because war was going to be deterred Military expenditure has gone up massively In one year India increased its military spending by more than the total military budget of Pakistan The next year it did it again So what did Pakistan do It further pushed its people into poverty further took money away from development poured it into its military budget and tested more ballistic missiles It is hard to point to any security benefit that has come to either country from having had nuclear weapons That was a lesson that was there to be learned from the history of the Cold War In 1949 when the U S nuclear monopoly was broken by the Soviet Union testing its weapons we did not see them say well ok you have nuclear weapons we have nuclear weapons We know we cannot fight nuclear war because we have a deterrent So let s just stop this nonsense No They started building more and more nuclear weapons which means they were not being deterred They were preparing to fight They thought if we just have enough nuclear weapons in a war we can overwhelm the other side We had this terrible scenario where the U S and the Soviets built many tens of thousands of nuclear weapons An even more important lesson that we ve learned central to this question of deterrence that you asked is that with the end of the Cold War which was now almost fifteen years ago and the disappearance of the Soviet Union and the end of Communism in the Soviet Union as an ideology that the U S sought to confront the weapons have not gone away So what is being deterred There is no enemy anymore The weapons have become autonomous They have taken on a life and logic of their own which goes beyond any possible threat of war between the United States and Russia In a funny sort of way the lessons we can learn from the experiences of the United States have been repeated in the experiences of Pakistan and India The nuclear weapons have only brought conflict more military expenditure and the prospect that countries even when they are supposed to be at peace will keep their nuclear weapons anyway CAROL BOSS Since the Manhattan Project was done in almost complete secrecy would it be correct to say that there was very little public debate over whether the U S should develop these weapons DR ZIA MIAN There was no public debate These things are almost always done in secret No country has announced in advance that it is going to go off and build nuclear weapons not even to its own people often not even to its own government Congress was not told about the Manhattan Project In Great Britain which has been a democracy

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL29.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks - The Death Penalty
    enough force that his glasses big heavy plastic prison issue glasses bounced off landed on his chest and then fell on the floor And then he didn t move again It seemed pretty violent to me INGLES Clearly Steve Earle and others believe that executing criminals does not model nonviolent conflict resolution Yet 37 states in the US still have the death penalty Polls on the issue indicate a nation split and the figures depend on how the question is asked Typically if asked Do you favor or oppose the death penalty for persons convicted of premeditated murder lately 65 to 70 say yes they favor the death penalty The number of those in favor of that question has been downtrending in recent years from its high of 80 in 1994 When asked Do you favor the death penalty or prefer to see it replaced with life imprisonment with no hope for parole and the prisoner working to raise money for the vicitims families generally 55 to 60 favor the alternative strategy offered in the question A few other facts of the 820 executions in the US since 1976 about two out of three were conducted in only five states Texas Virginia Missouri Florida and Oklahoma Texas leads the other states in number of killings In figures from late 2002 there were about 3 697 prisoners carrying death sentences in the 37 states that still have the death penalty In some of those states legislatures are debating the issue One state that grappled with it recently was New Mexico in its 2005 legislative session In hearings Representatives heard many of the arguments against the death penalty that we re hearing from Steve Earle today But they also heard from death penalty supporters Reporter Deborah Martinez gathered some of that testimony for us Interviewer Paul Ingles DEBORAH MARTINEZ REPORTER Lawmakers heard from people like Mike Bowen a retired state police officer who spoke on behalf of law enforcement MIKE BOWEN We in the law enforcement community believe that the death penalty works And we believe that it is a deterrent It has been proven to us As Mr Martinez mentioned especially during the prison riot of 1980 And on behalf of those men and women who work in what as been described as these rat holes out there and those of us who had the honor and the privilege of working with officers of the caliber of Gerald Klein we ask you to kill this bill Thank you DEBORAH MARTINEZ Donna McNevin s father was shot dead at a KOA campground She spoke out in favor of the current law warning that repealing it would invite killers to New Mexico DONNA MCNEVIN Will we be telling murderers from other states to come to our state because they will not be held responsible for the actions that they have chosen to take Are we saying it s OK to brutally murder Are we telling them that New Mexico has just given them

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL26.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks King's Path To Nonviolence
    actually be more tuned in to the beauty the diversity the different colors the rainbow this potpourri of vibrancy that is the human family I was just curious what you thought your father s foremost concerns would be in today s world and the challenges for him YOLANDA KING I have to always say before I answer questions like that that my father was ahead of his time when he was with us Who knows where his focus would be It s hard to say But I certainly believe that one of the things that he would be most concerned about is the fact that we continue to be so bent on using militarism to solve every problem that we have That s one of the things that I know he would be focusing on reminding us so strongly that this has just never worked All it does is create vengeance and vindictiveness I know that would be an issue as well as the fact that the gulf between the haves and the have nots still remains far too large Those two issues he was championing at the end of his days And unfortunately we continue to be plagued by them Do you consider the work that you do an evolution from his work YOLANDA KING I do I do One of the programs that I m most proud of that is relatively recent launching through my company Higher Ground Productions is the Inner Peace Circles where we work with people on a monthly basis we offer a tele class and actually share with people the principles that I feel are really invaluable if one is going to attain a place of inner peace Because my father was trying to take us as a nation as a planet this place of peace this place of brotherhood and sisterhood this world house he was trying to create where people could live together in peace and justice and with the kind of respect and appreciation for each other I think we re not going to ever get there if more and more of us until more and more of us really understand how important and what our responsibility is to find our own place of inner peace and to deepen that peace Because I truly believe that it reverberates where if you are able to carry that place and embody that place of peace then it obviously contributes to wherever you find yourself in your home in your workplace in your community in every aspect of your life And if more and more of us our really committed to doing that I think it could make a real difference on the planet Where my father was trying to take us as a nation and as a planet was this place of peace this place of brotherhood and sisterhood this world house that he was trying to create where people could live together in peace and justice and with respect and appreciation for

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL23-24.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Peace Talks - Tempering Travel Rage
    acknowledge it means you have to face it and admit that Yes I have Road Rage even if I don t have a ticket and I haven t gotten into any fights with anybody I still have Road Rage and I m aggressive The second step is that you have to be a witness to yourself when you drive You sort of split your mind into two so you can observe the you that is driving Then you begin to discover that you re not as good a driver as you think and you also begin to observe when you start to get hot under the collar so you can anticipate in advance and have more of a chance to do something about it And the last step is to modify So on any trip you pick one thing to focus on whether it s emotional or outward behavioral whether it s following too close or getting mad when someone tries to get in or closing the gap when someone wants to get in ahead of me So you begin to work with each of these and become more rational Dr Leon James Road Rage and Agressive Driving by Dr Leon James and Dr Diane Kahl James One of the things that I recommend when you suddenly feel like you re going to explode is to make funny noises It could be animal noises or just strange noises anything at all that requires a lot of energy some people say you can just start breathing in a certain way In the first ten seconds just before you re going to explode you need to control that in any way that you can and breathing is important And also you need to watch your hands whether they tighten around the wheel so you try to relax the hands By the time that first ten seconds has gone by that adrenaline is much less intense and then you are able to give yourself a pep talk Then you have to be prepared with your new philosophy of driving less aggressively Talk about how a car is really like an enclosed capsule that makes us feel separate and somewhat invincible when we re in traffic James Driver annonymity and driver alienation go together because when you re enclosed in your capsule all by yourself you also have an opportunity to become alienated so that you begin to think negatively about all the drivers around you Therefore we no longer have a highway community but we have a warfare going on That s one of the reasons I don t like dark tinited windows because you can t see the other driver you have no idea what s going on What is that other driver doing Are they looking at me Are they not Are they looking ahead That s not a good feeling because driving is a cooperative process So rather than feel more isolated I think what we need to do is

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL15.html (2016-02-13)
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