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  • Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes
    we mean is a place that has limited access to fresh and healthy foods and not just limited access when it comes to distance Because there is a debate right now about whether food deserts actually exist because people tend to actually live in close enough proximity to a grocery store to get there with the cars that they generally do have access to even if they don t own So we re not talking just about proximity We re talking about the convergence of proximity to healthy food with affordability of that healthy food and accessibility when it comes to the type of healthy food Because if you are a Vietnamese family and your healthy foods look very different than the USDA food pyramid then you may not have very much access Boss Very often when you hear the word food desert paired with that is food insecurity Henderson Yes Boss How big of a problem is this nationally Henderson Oh it s a very big problem nationally I think there was a study done a little while ago that said something like one out of ten people in the country maybe even more than that are food insecure and that s a big deal especially when you look at the fact that the most food insecure homes across the country across the board are African American women led homes So this is a serious problem in communities of color and especially with people with limited incomes Boss Jacqueline Thomas having lived in West Oakland from the early to mid 90s then leaving and returning again you experienced this food insecurity What was it like for you to be living in a food wasteland Jacqueline Thomas It was very difficult especially knowing that I was living in a wasteland or a food wasteland and not having grown up in that dynamic I actually grew up in a place in Santa Rosa which was abundant with foods and farms and so forth around When I came and moved to West Oakland it was somewhat of a shock and it was difficult especially once I became ill it was difficult to maintain my health because it was difficult to get healthy food And that often entailed taking a BART ride and a bus ride or three buses if I did not take the BART to a store where I could actually get the type of foods that I needed And even then having the income to purchase healthier foods was also difficult because it s more expensive for some reason to eat healthy than it is to not eat healthy So a lot of that fell on my children to follow the shopping list and go shopping for me once I was unable to do that Boss It sounds like even with the intention of wanting to eat well it was a tremendous challenge Thomas It was It actually entailed shopping at possibly two to three places in order to get the right balance of foods that we needed We would go to a major grocery store in Emeryville for meats We would go to Chinatown for our vegetables and things like that or for fresh vegetables that we could actually afford Not that the major store didn t have fresh vegetables we could not afford those vegetables there so we would have to go to Chinatown to the venues that had the more affordable fresh vegetables So that entails allocating a nice chunk of your budget for travel just to go shopping Boss Nikki Henderson what was the original approach People s Grocery took to pursue community change that is to improve the health and economy of West Oakland through food Henderson Originally we approached that using urban agriculture first so growing the food then taking that food into enterprises that were led by youth in the community Our first enterprise was the mobile market a market on wheels Then through that enterprise doing health and nutrition demonstrations and nutrition education so that you could raise the demand for healthy food That would then go back and feedback into the enterprise which would create more money to do the production which would create more food and it was a feedback loop that was all eventually supposed to culminate in a grocery store hence the name People s Grocery Boss Can you tell us about the mobile market and what the impact of it was in West Oakland Henderson The mobile market was a converted postal truck that we painted brightly purple and orange with youth with purple and orange t shirts with hip hop music blasting and healthy produce From what I hear this was before my time at People s Grocery but from what I hear we hit every house in West Oakland over the course of the summer and made sure that if they weren t home we went back again So I think one of the greatest successes of the mobile market was that it was an outreach strategy to really introduce People s Grocery to the community so that once we started our produce box which actually is much more effective in getting food to people on a regular basis people knew who we were and they trusted us and they knew that we were actually trying to solve a very serious problem Boss Well tell us about I think you were referring to The Grub Box Henderson Yeah The Grub Box So The Grub Box is a food distribution program that s kind of a fusion community supported agriculture program A community supported agriculture is a system in which customers pay the farmer directly at the beginning of a season and purchase a share so to speak of the farm so that if the farmer suffers from blight or weather or any of the other things that happen that you just can t anticipate when you re growing food then customer is bearing the burden in addition to the farmer So we use that model but we also subsidize that with food from an aggregator who aggregates food from local producers and all of that is outsourced to a farm called Dig Deep Farms Produce which is in the San Leandro area So functionally what that looks like is that if you want to get a produce box you can order with us and then on Tuesdays and Fridays you can choose what size bag of groceries that you get and it s all fresh and local produce Boss In terms of purchasing that as a consumer it s affordable for any resident that would like it Henderson Yeah we actually just debuted our new pricing system So you can pay ten dollars for a five pound bag of food You can pay fifteen dollars for a ten pound bag of food twenty dollars for a fifteen pound bag of food and twenty five dollars for a twenty pound bag of food Boss Tell us for a moment something about Dig Deep Farms Henderson Dig Deep Farms Produce is a really really wonderful program It s fiscally sponsored by the Sherriff s Activity League in the Ashland Cherryland of California and it s a program whose goal is to create an alternative way for youth in the community to engage instead of being on the streets So many of the people that work there people of color African Americans and Latino s the goal is actually for community benefit So we wanted to find a farm that actually shared our social justice values and we were very very happy to find them so that we could work with them Boss So it s really working with so call vulnerable youth Henderson Yes Boss It seems that People s Grocery does a lot of collaboration and forms partnerships and the one that you have with Dig Deep Farms seems to be spreading I know you ve called the health and the wealth Do you think part of what people s grocery is doing is extending community in a sense Henderson I would definitely say so and with things like The Grub Box you can see it really obviously but I would also say that it goes between communities as well because one of the symptoms of being an organization like People s Grocery is that it s not just people that are vulnerable and in food insecure communities that like us It s people that are actually very food secure who care very much that down the street from their house is a community that s really food insecure So I think that we do a lot of bridging of social capital as well when those who are more privileged come and see what we do and really really want to figure out ways to support us Peace Talks Radio Host Carol Boss talks with Amy Anixter Scott and Vitoria Apodaca of The Fiestas Project in Santa Barbara Martineztown Albuquerque New Mexico Carol Boss Amy Anixter Scott there are different ways of thinking about peace You mentioned to me seeing the film 10 Questions for the Dalai Lama and he was asked about the conflict in the Middle East and what can be done to make peace there and you told me his response Amy Anixter Scott His response was more picnics and more festivals Boss What did you think when you were watching that film and heard that response That s probably not a response we might think the Dalai Lama would give to such a question Scott It resonated with me It surprised me I didn t expect that But from the work in community with community that I ve had the opportunity to be involved with and what you ll hear more of during this discussion it made sense Boss So in way when you walked out did you think that was kind of a profound remark for him to make One might take it as whimsical coming from the Dalai Lama because he can be whimsical Scott He can be The Dalai Lama through this film and other things that I ve seen of his presentations and readings he s approachable He is really about personal relationships about individual happiness happiness and practice in action with others in community So when he responded to the question more picnics and festivals it meant to me why not sit in community with people share food break bread watch our children play get to know each other discuss things in our community or in a safe place or maybe it s not so safe Maybe that was to have more picnics and festivals in the Gaza Strip But how do we come together Coming together around food can create a peaceful environment Boss Well I thought about the phrase coming to the table together which we ve certainly heard in regards to diplomatic efforts one side negotiating with the other making peace agreements So any thoughts on that and how you see that as a metaphor and how this meshes with your project and about the communities you ve worked with Scott Well it s interesting that you say coming together at the table I mean there are summits yes and in fact the Dalai Lama has said we should have more picnics and less summits I mean summits are important The World Food Summit many places for people to come together to discuss policy and action points But when I talk about coming to the table I mean who can sit at the table Who has access to the table Who can bring food to the table or if you don t have food can you come to the table and share food with someone So there are opportunities To me the table means access it means opportunity it means equity it means healthy food to share our stories our needs and how we can work together to achieve our aims in community Boss So how does all this mesh with your Fiestas project Scott Well it meshes on several different levels I work with the Office for Community Health I work in community I work with community partners like Veronica Apodaca and others in Santa Barbara Martineztown Here we have a community that is really in the middle of Albuquerque very close to downtown a couple of miles away from the university next to the largest high school in the community It was once an agricultural community There are Acequias Those are small irrigation channels that run throughout the community They re now dried up through urban development These Acequia s were actually shut down but there is still some farming going on there small gardens It s a food desert There is little access to affordable and nutritious and culturally relevant food in this community It s a food desert Often when we think about food deserts we think about a rural community Many communities in Albuquerque people may have to drive 100 hundred miles roundtrip to be able to access food But here is a community where the ability to access food is not based on some of it is based on mileage but it s based on are there community stores Can people afford food What types of food is accessible There are fast food stores in this community a few small community stores which support the community Boss Some listening to this conversation might ask why aren t there decent grocery stores in Martineztown Apodaca I believe that it s zoning It s our neighborhood We are a little village within the city We did have grocery stores in Martineztown They were family run We do have a couple of spots like the Chili Connection and Manuel s grocery store but those don t really have the full range that a big grocery store would have So I believe that with this project I think that it s going to help us to identify a good way to bring in a need effect grocery store to our neighborhood whether it be using our fresh produce grown in our community garden if it s employing our neighbors or residents but I believe that it should be conceptualized by our residents Boss Do communities in the food desert category ever petition food companies to place better stores in the neighborhood Apodaca Within our sector development plan our community came together and it s in the process of being approved to find a space where we can create a marketplace where local residents can bring in their business And the idea is to have a little coop a fresh fruit stand So I believe that our neighborhood we are a food desert but we don t want some big old entity coming in like Amy had said but bringing culturally relevant food things that we re used to growing eating and gathering around And using our voice our neighborhood association is asking our residents what they want and that s what we ve identified So we want to be able to take that and roll with it but roll with it in a constructive way in the sense that they are going to construct the idea of what they would like their grocery store to look like their participation in it and not to just bring in some big old mass market but something that will promote local commerce where you ll always see your neighbor shopping in the same spot that you are Scott To bring in a large grocery store or medium sized grocery store into a community means that there is a store there but do people have the economic means to access this food Can they pay for it Can they afford it We look at our elders and many individuals across age groups What do we pay for Do we pay for food or am I going to pay for the medicine that I need Or what about the gas bill that s gone up Or what about my children s clothing People make choices every day so having a store doesn t mean that they would have the opportunity to purchase food There are fast food stores in Santa Barbara Martineztown People have access to that kind of food and it s cheap Is it nutritious No Is it fast and is it easy because they re working several jobs Fiestas is going to address the food desert in this community in Santa Barbara Martineztown by bring people together bringing women together to be able to share information ideas stories and hopes to have conversations where they can discuss not only the problems that are happening in their lives and in their community s life but to talk about solutions Solutions are addressed by having a safe and peaceful place or table to sit down and talk about what s happening in our community We believe in this community I don t live in this community Veronica does The women that I work with the women that I partner are in this community and the community association They re strong voices They re people who have lived there for years There are immigrants There are people who are just moving into the community We think we ll find some solutions We don t have all the solutions yet but we think we ll find some of the solutions Boss Why aren t men an essential part of this project What is it about gathering the women Scott Well men are part of the project and they re being interviewed They ll be hearing about the information They re part of these families They re part of the extended families Women are often the nutritional gatekeepers in the family They are the ones who are the nexus They are the central person in the family that does

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL108_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes
    him that specifically says he was jumping with joy but I know he was such a peace man that I m sure he was very happy about it Thinking of the symbol I call it the chameleon like symbol because it was originally anti nukes and then it went to anti war the Vietnam War then Greenpeace picked it up and used the symbol added their little bit to it Civil Rights the Women Strike for Peace all these organizations Even more recently CODEPINK has used the symbol I don t know if he thought back then that that many people and that many organizations would pick it up and use it but it certainly proved to be a very powerful image Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with Leigh Golterman manager of PEACE PLEASE a peace symbol apparel online store Ingles Leigh Golterman manages an organization called Peace Please Leigh thanks for talking with me on Peace Talks Radio today Golterman Hey it s my pleasure Thank you Paul Ingles Leigh is it fair to say that you ve had an important relationship with the peace symbol for some time now Golterman You know I guess you could say that It s interesting I ve been in the corporate world and doing all those things and back in 2000 I went over to the Middle East to Jerusalem to try and find a way to combine the internet and peace and I came back actually I was scheduled to come back to New York on September 11 2001 and at that point the drums of war started beating and that s when the foundations of Peace Please kind of came together Ingles So you actually were held up because of September 11th Golterman I was I was I was flying back that evening and didn t end up coming back I guess for about three or four days or something like that Ingles So tell us then what you were moved to do in about 2002 or so Golterman Sure well you know after September 11th and with the Afghan War and such all of a sudden drums were beating for Iraq so I was protesting just as an individual and I realized that all the signs were quite angry using expletives and such and I thought you know if we want to do something positive if we want to create peace or stop a war we need to get some positive messages out there So I put Peace Please on the front and created a shirt one with the Jefferson quote and one with the earth on it with a peace symbol over it and people responded to them Like me they were looking for some positivity out there in kind of a dark time Ingles What was that Jefferson quote Golterman The Jefferson quote said Peace and friendship with all mankind is our wisest policy and I wish that we may be permitted to pursue it Ingles Nice Was there really an absence of the peace symbol itself in rallies at that time Golterman You know there was I have to say that I think I really brought it to the streets here in New York in any case and actually in Washington D C Like I say the messages and such were all really quite negative quite angry and certainly there was reason to be angry but the peace symbol outside the old hippies with their 60s shirts or such that was about that time So when I made those shirts I remember one rally we sold 600 shirts in about two hours I think there was just a dearth of anything that people could bring out with that kind of symbol with that message Ingles Well I m looking at your website and some of the items you ve offered through the years t shirts that say Peace is Active Peace is a Decision Here s one that says Let s Try Peace with the peace symbol and the white dove of peace over the globe as you mentioned Israeli Palestinian flags that say Support Sanity Justice Peace Life What else War Off Peace On You ve had some fun with this it looks like Golterman We have We have Over time different messages seem to resonate depending on what was going on We have our peace army shirt that says War is not the way and some of those other shirts that you mentioned just trying to get different messages out at different times I remember when we did one in English and Arabic which just said Enough At that point I think that was probably five years on into the war we were all feeling like we were banging our heads on the wall a little bit and nothing was happening I think that brought out the frustration It was a hugely popular shirt at that moment Ingles Yeah Of course there are t shirts and bumper stickers and buttons I m looking at your website I don t know if all of these items are still available but you ve had an indoor outdoor peace light a peace tote bag mirror art necklaces and pendants and sterling rings What have been top sellers Golterman The peace light is hugely popular I remember people would keep sending me emails and say We re trying to find a peace light What can we do And I would always instruct them to take a hanger and take some lights and string them around it and finally after about a couple of years of that I said I think we need to do something to make it easier for folks so we introduced the light as an LED and low electricity usage It s been hugely popular Simply the sterling pendants it s interesting that back when I started this I would walk the New York Trade Show just trying to find a peace symbol

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL109_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes
    wait for several days If a message was carried by a courier it would take weeks for them to leave Kabul go through India take a boat and go to Europe to deliver something Today everything is almost instantaneous You have to be on edge and you have to be ready for the immediate event that could take place or the immediate response that is required or the immediate solution that you have to offer to a problem But of course there are times when you enter negotiations in which they are not always instantaneous They take time They need preparation They need a lot of shuttle diplomacy They need a lot of thinking They need a lot of knowledge You tap into all the pools of knowledge that exist because no one diplomat or no one negotiator knows everything about any given issue So today someone who negotiates with Afghanistan has to rely on dozens of experts in so many different fields in order to then sit at a table and start talking to another side It has become that complex but we also have the benefit of having so much information and so much knowledge that is accessible now that wasn t so easily accessible back then Kryder Cross cultural issues really complicate negotiations as well You were the Afghan Ambassador to Canada and then to France What kinds of issues came up in each of those countries that were especially challenging or different based on the culture How did you learn how to adapt your style to the different cultures Samad I had the added advantage of having been exposed to Western societies and Western languages as I mentioned to you earlier because I grew up partially in a Western society But each Western society is different I cannot compare Canada to the United States or France to the UK or Italy What a diplomat does first of all is get to know his or her environment and that environment means not only history but it means society it means economy and everything that makes up a country as complex as it is and no one should claim to know everything about a country or be an expert in anything The boundaries of knowledge are beyond our reach and it s a good thing What you have to do is strengthen your knowledge base then your job is to connect and that s where cross culturalism comes into play using your country s baggage and whatever makes your country identifiable or seen and perceived by the other side as being different You go in and try to tell people that you re not so different actually that we have a lot to share and a lot in common A diplomat s job is actually to create those bonds and those bridges and those connectivity s and those areas where we come together whether as human beings or as entities whether national entities or cultural entities or ethnic entities whatever it might be So you have to explain I come from a culture from a society from a background that is already complex Afghanistan is a multi ethnic society multi lingual society It has 5 000 years of history It s an old ancient land that has gone through a lot You have to explain that to people Canada was extremely interested in what was happening in Afghanistan because Afghanistan became Canada s number one foreign policy issues while I was there as ambassador I made a point of being the voice and the face of Afghanistan I engaged the Canadian s to the extent that I could at all levels from grassroots to the top of the government I think that that s what I believe is a diplomat s job While doing so you also bring up issues You deal with all kinds of events that take place on a daily basis good and bad policy issues decisions that have to be taken strategic decisions as well as tactical decisions A diplomat s job a negotiators job is of course working within the confines of another country as to respect the limits that exist without stepping overboard but offer the viewpoint that is necessary Kryder Ambassador Samad I wanted to ask you who some of the experts in diplomacy and international relations are who you really respect but I m also curious what you learned from your father about diplomacy Samad Probably not enough I should have probably learned much more but I still am in learning mode and will continue to be But I believe that I ve always been fascinated by history and historical figures and especially figures who had to deal with complexities and crises and conflict and challenges and how they dealt with it Some dealt with it with those adversities successfully and some didn t and so I think that what I have done over the years is look at these figures and what they faced and how they faced what they went through I m still amazed by how difficult it is to be a leader It really is a challenging task and I think that the general public really doesn t sometimes appreciate that as much as they should I think there is so much pressure on leaders nowadays whether they are political leaders or whether they are leaders in the private sector There is a lot of pressure so you have to build character I ve looked at character as well I ve tried to see what character traits make a good leader or a bad leader That brings me to my own family My father and both my grandfather s who both were diplomats actually at some point One was a career diplomat and the other wasn t I saw character traits that I hope have impacted me I think that integrity is very important I think that being purposeful in life having a purpose a cause

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  • Mary Oishi's predawn sorority
    her AIDS orphaned grandchildren do without her and i m troubled too and get up and worry the water into a pot of tea at two a m i sip slowly on hot tears and keep company with my sisters and pray i do not fall prey to all that passes for sanity in this world pray that i stay madly loving without succumbing to the madness slip my prayer

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  • Untitled Document
    of your ancestry peace is being able to get health care for you and your family every time you need it peace is free and fresh drinking water peace is knowing that the food you eat is not infused with chemicals that will cause you cancer or with genes that may mutate future generations peace is no child cowering before a raging or addicted parent peace is no child having to keep an adult s dirty secret peace is no child going hungry peace is no child without a sheltered and secure place to sleep peace is never having to become a refugee peace is never having your home bulldozed or commandeered by eminent domain peace is never worrying about being displaced peace is uninterrupted sleep peace is loving whomever you love regardless of gender yours or theirs peace is growing old with respect peace is no citizen anywhere ever having to suffer or die for the decisions of those in government peace is no draftboards no economic blackmail to become a murderer martyr peace is being content in your own body peace is never walking on eggshells peace is no censorship peace is no self censorship peace is no curfews peace is no border patrols peace is no weapons mass or singular peace is no electric chairs no lethal injections no hangings no lynchings no firing squads no death row peace is no vigilanteeism institutional or spontaneous peace is no chains physical or psychological peace is no violence in policy in actions in language in feelings or in thoughts peace is sharing the earth humbly with other species peace is fertile soil and breathable air peace is living in a society where human needs matter more than the profits of a greedy few peace is knowing you don t

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