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  • Good Radio Shows: Radio Stations

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  • Good Radio Shows: Contribute

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  • Good Radio Shows: 2015 Episodes
    that part of the reason Maria and I generally use the term civil resistance for example is because we find that it has less baggage than using the term nonviolent resistance where people immediately assume that you re arguing from a moral position rather than a strategic or politically efficacious position I think that part of that is nomenclature part of it is just sheer misunderstanding about the power of nonviolent resistance The way that people are taught in school is that Gandhi and King were just wonderful human beings who had very admirable moral qualities and behavior but that they both got assassinated and neither of them really ended up getting what they wanted in the end The nice guys finished last We celebrate warfare we celebrate our war heroes much more even when they fail so it s kind of a strange double standard that occurs with talking about nonviolent resistance and many progressive or radical communities nonviolent resistance is a dirty word because it is equated with passivity or pacification There are arguments out there that nonviolence helps the stat because people are not really willing to engage in truly militant radical action and therefore the state wins I think both of these perspectives that are very skeptical about nonviolent resistance are just not support in the empirical record at all Boss Talk about the challenge of nonviolent movements keeping fringe elements from sparking violence that can bring law enforcement or military power down on an otherwise nonviolent gathering Chenoweth Nonviolent discipline is one of the major challenges of social movements so the question is how do you basically keep a movement nonviolent particularly when it s being provoked into violence by the opponent and there are some useful lessons at least at the tactical level that we can draw from recent cases One comes from the Serbian case actually where many of the fears of violent flanks emerging from within the movement were dealt with by developing marshals who would actually go around in groups and if they saw somebody who was beginning to react violently to police or something along those lines they would immediately surround them and take them over to a line of taxi s where they had arranged for the drivers to take the person into the back seat of the car and drive them about ten miles away so that they couldn t actually disrupt the demonstration Another way to deal with this is actually to explicitly state that the campaign is nonviolent and committed to nonviolent action such that people who don t participate in that way are not members of the campaign and there is a lot of controversy about that of course but it is one way to signal that those that are engaging in violent flank behavior are not actually doing so with the permission of the campaign as a whole Another thing that s been done just to create some impulse control within the campaign as training Many campaigns including campaigns during the Civil Rights Movement in The United States engaged in routine regular training where people prepared themselves to be antagonized into violence by thugs hooligans and the police and they were able to develop in themselves a sense of self restraint and impulse control such that they did not have to react violently when confronted This is not easy Many humans are designed to actually react to violent provocation with self defensive acts of violence and so I m learning that can be a process Those movements that have used training as an active component of doing that have found some success at the tactical level in so doing Peace Talks Radio host Carol Boss talks with Ken Butigan Executive Director of Pace E Bene Carol Boss So Ken when you think of all your years of studying and teaching and practicing nonviolent action is there a story is there an experience that sticks in your mind that really moves you and in a way reinforces your commitment to this work Ken Butigan In 1985 I was involved in a movement that was trying to end the U S War in Central America which had been going on for several years As part of that effort we started a group called The Pledge of Resistance which was 100 000 across The United States who took a pledge to engage in nonviolence action if the U S escalated its military intervention in Central America As part of that at one point I engaged in nonviolent civil disobedience and actually ended up receiving a six week prison sentence I was engaging in nonviolent action at a federal building in San Francisco and they decided to make an example of us I guess There were three of us and then I was sent off to 14 different prisons and eventually landed at Boron Federal Prison in the Mojave Desert in California Basically it s a minimum security prison but they try to keep you in line psychologically We got an orientation from a guard named if you can believe it Sergeant Lord Sergeant Lord had a job to basically put fear of the Lord in us and said that if we stepped out of line in any way we would be sent off to maximum security prison and we would face all kinds of retribution Anyway one day I was walking along in the prison yard and Sergeant Lord came up and said You get up on the ridge and pick up garbage I said Oh okay good I ll do that So I walked up there and about a half hour later as I m picking up trash overlooking the Mojave Desert out in the middle of nowhere this Jeep Cherokee pulls up with tinted windows and the window comes down and it s Sergeant Lord He said What are you doing here I said You told me to come and pick up trash He said

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL150_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2015 Episodes
    out on my street Is that a police response or is that a government response In Albuquerque that s actually PNM who oversees the lights on the street They are actually the ones who are responsible for it It could be the Department of Municipal Development If it s safety at a park who manages that park It s Parks and Recreation Who lives at that park Who uses the park If individuals who are living in homelessness are using a park to be able to camp there because they have no place to be whose responsibility is it to address the issue of homelessness It s not the police department but it s a public safety issue It s homeless service providers It s a poverty issue It could be a mental illness issue It could be PTSD issue Why are individuals living homelessly Why do they lose their jobs If it s a pan handling issue whose responsibility is it to address pan handling If you give somebody money then of course they ll come back but there are so many opportunities for food around Albuquerque that there are very few hungry people but that becomes a public safety issue to both the community who doesn t want the pan handlers there and somebody standing on a median could be hit They could be injured They could be killed That s a public safety issue So it s not just crime it s all kinds of stuff and how do we define who we draw into the solution If we rely on police to get that homeless person out of the park that homeless person is going to go someplace else How do provide a solution such as Heading Home that Albuquerque has that deals with the underlying condition as to why that person is living homelessly Everybody is their own puzzle and we have to be able to be willing to change the way we address those Ingles It sounds like you re saying that we need to broaden our view and that the police department is not the answer to all of these issues Fischer To me that s the realm we have to work towards if we re really going to get to the idea of community building and a better relationship with law enforcement We need to change our expectations of what we want them to do Ingles Okay and finally say someone in the police department is catching the broadcast what are a couple of steps that would encourage that side to create the synergy that would help the issue of strained relations between citizens and law enforcement Fischer I think if you talk to the command staff the administration you would get Yes we want to do that and then they would do the things they ve always done which is try to get neighborhood associations or people to engage but the difficulty is the frontline officer who says I don t have the time to do that I go from call to call to call to call I m working overtime I m forced into working overtime On my days off I have to go to court Ingles Is it logistically possible to make what seems like a common sense shift in the way that policing is done Fischer The only reason it s not logistically possible is the willingness not to do it to not try You ve got to try You ve got to rethink the way you deploy your resources The persons job who you see in the marked vehicle is to answer calls for service The complication is that there are fewer officers but we still want a police officer to respond when we call The number of officers working a shift in part of the city could be 20 10 I don t know I don t know that answer but it used to be very low How do those frontline officers find the time to do it Instead of saying they re going to do this if we want to build a better community and give you more time two hours a week to work with your community how could you do that and still meet the responsibility of answering calls for service They re probably the ones who have the solution I ve never answered a call for service I don t know what is entailed but I know that the people who are expected to make the change have to be just like the community is The law and frontline officers have to be part of how we define that solution KOB TV s Tom Joles interviews several New Mexico Law Enforcement Officers May 15 2015 at KOB TV Studios Albuquerque New Mexico Officer John Garcia Albuquerque Tom I would add that respect is a huge thing I work the streets a lot I m a bike officer so I m out on the streets a lot One of the things that the street knows is respect I think that s the hardest part is when people come up to you Yes we get a lot of thank you s and good job s but at times we get a lot of Go away We don t want to deal with you They look at us as the enemy when we are here just to help and serve our communities Joles The enemy In your opinion what needs to be done to heal this divide that exists Officer Brian Werley Albuquerque I believe that there is a cooperative team effort that we have to take with the community Law enforcement can t be everywhere at any given time When we re dealing with a situation a lot of times they are the eyes and ears of the community and it takes that cooperation with the community to bring things to light for us to be able to step in and help out Open lines of communication Joles Open lines of communication Anything else Deputy Aaron Schwartz Bernalillo County Well no matter what happens whether it s on the news or the riots or anything like that I believe that only a small portion of society really truly believes we are the enemy I think for the most part society does support us and no matter what happens we re going to put on the uniform every day and do our best on the streets Joles Good Anything else Officer Gardner Finney Santa Fe Citizens Academy The people who participate in that in Santa Fe we often get activists who are not criminals who are not family and friends of police officers Family and friends of cops know how police are and that we re decent folks But activists will often do the Citizens Academy and do a ride along and see what we deal with and by the end of that day of spending a shift with an officer it s a huge change in someone s perception and that s helpful Officer Shermane Carter Albuquerque Just to add to that I think increasing public awareness as to what a police officer does we have a multitude of hats that we wear on a daily basis We are the Mama we are the Daddy we are the counselor we are a safe person that a child talks to so there is a lot to us Joles One last question the media How is the reporting on law enforcement in this state Officer John Garcia Albuquerque I ll just add really quickly A lot of times I think the media dictates a lot what s going on in society and in public and what the public eye sees so I think a lot of that can be bad or good as we re doing now Deputy Autumn Neas Bernalillo County Also it s not compared to the entirety of police encounters One awful issue is not compared to the many positive encounters that we deal with the encounters in general that we deal with even traffic stops Those are encounters as well Officer Brian Werley Albuquerque When we re called to deal with a situation things that are reported to law enforcement professionals can turn into a fluted and dynamic rapidly evolving situation It does take some time to bring everything in and decide how things are going when it comes to that type of situation So media will show the end result of what happened a X Y and Z not showing the entirety of A B and C of what was done first before it ended in the situation how it ended What s also tough too is anyone who is not in law enforcement it s difficult for them to even have a perspective just because they are not trained in our tactics so in a sense it is a very unbiased opinion and it is reporting but a lot of times it s misunderstood what we do and why we do things Joles I want to thank all of you for being here Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with James Ginger CEO of Public Management in Pamplico South Carolina Ginger It s relatively simple the process the flowchart is a relatively simple thing It starts with good policy it continues with training and it continues with good supervision and good discipline Those are the pillars of a good policing process and it sounds almost too simple to be true but that is the approach It has been the approach in virtually every one of these USDOJ consent decrees and settlement agreements That s where they focus on those sorts of things Ingles Well Jim you set up a good what I would call scaffolding for the process saying that programs work with administration work with hiring work with training when you have to bring change through a department Let s say in the hiring process first what are some of the bullet points or the most important things that are generally lacking that are generally in need of change Ginger The answer is we fail to do good solid comprehensive background investigations to make sure that this is not someone who has had six other law enforcement jobs lasted two years in each and now he s he trying to get a law enforcement job in our community That s a huge red flag and the problem actually turns out to be that the argument is made particularly among small police departments is that we don t have the time to do background investigations and we don t have the resources The response to that is you don t have the resources not to If you engage in a practice of negligent hiring and get one or two or three officers in your agency who have been either terminated or allowed to resign in lieu of termination in two or three other police departments before you hired them that s a negligent hire and as a city or a town you re liable for that officer s actions particularly the ones that are similar to what they ve been either fired for in the past or allowed to resign in lieu of termination in the past Recently here in South Carolina we had a 97 million jury verdict against a small town for negligent hiring They had hired an officer who had had seven previous law enforcement employments and been fired from all but one of them or allowed to resign in lieu of termination or fired from all of them but one and the jury was so disgusted with that negligence that they found for the plaintiff in that case to the tune of 97 million The argument that we can t afford to do it is sort of put to bed by that one You can t afford not to unless you happen to have 97 million laying around that you don t need Ingles Yes 97 million can pay for a lot of resources and positions that can do background checks Ginger Exactly so there is really no reason not to do these things but there are 97 million good reasons to do them Ingles Again it strikes me that it s easier to track a candidates technical skills with firearms or with time on a beat or in a department It s more difficult to track a persons emotional map Ginger That s true although we do have even pen and pencil tests now that will at least give you a clue and then seven phone calls in that particular instance would have trigger that as well so it s not like it s that difficult to do Ingles It strikes me that recruiting and hiring on an administrative level really sets the stage for everything Could you talk a little bit about shoring up that process so that people are found for the top of these departments Ginger Well that s another issue entirely Nothing says competency like good leadership but then you need city councils and city executives town councils and town executives who are willing to actually search out the best qualified candidates and bring them into that executive level when they re searching for a new chief of police The flip side of that is that that doesn t accrue to county sheriff s departments Those are elected positions so you get into a whole other set of issues with that in terms of hiring the best folks but from a municipal or town police perspective which is where we tend to have most of our problems It s a commitment on the part of city council it s a commitment on the part of the mayor s office or whoever the chief executive of the city is to truly find the best people not the people who are best politically connected not the people who we know best but the best people we can find The process of hiring a police chief in the United States today is highly competitive from a couple of different angles If you advertise for a chief of police in South Carolina you re probably going to get 150 applications so it s not a lack of competent that s not to say that all 150 are competent candidates It s the willingness and the ability to whittle those out to the three or four or five who are obviously the best qualified and then the wherewithal and the fortitude to pay for those folks because they re becoming like any other CEO position very well compensated in the United States That means that if you want a really good chief of police you re going to have to be willing to pay for him or her to come onboard because they no longer work for 45 000 or 50 000 in most cases Some of these packages are quite substantial That s another issue that is often confronted by city councils and city managers and mayors is well sure this woman is well qualified and we d love to have her but we can t afford to pay her So you wind up maybe five or six or seven folks down the line from the very best qualified candidate simply because you can t afford the signing bonuses and those sorts of things that chiefs of police are starting to get nowadays in this country Ingles I guess that unless somebody on the council makes that 97 million settlement story part of the conversation Ginger Exactly The final analysis in this thing is that it can be very expensive to hire a bad chief of police Peace Talks Radio Host Paul Ingles talks with Greg Saville criminologist police trainer former police officer and author of You In Blue Saville The more the police and community know each other by personal name and work together directly on minor problems and solving problems together the more they do that the better the relations are going to be That s the first place I would go The second place I d go is we need to seriously retool and rethink the training systems for police The training regimes are obsolete out of date and I think they lead to many of the problems We have just written a book about this whole problem called You in Blue and I think that s where we need to go Ingles Well tell me more about that then Tell me more about where the training needs to go where maybe it hasn t been going in recent years Saville Well the interesting thing is that police are very quick to adopt new technologies new military strategies and military equipment but they re very resistant to adopting new training methods new ways to educate and help learners learn So our approach is to say look at the training methodologies look at the way training is done and you discover a rigid militaristic power point driven sage on the stage style of learning sprinkled with war stories and sprinkled with some scenarios that it obsolete and far out of date and leads to more problems than it s worth Modern education has gone leaps and bounds beyond that We need to update and seriously upgrade the way police training is done with modern collaborative community based educational methods What we do is we create a program called problem based learning and we ve been through the Department of Justice for the last seven years and gradually helping police training programs and police academies to update and upgrade their methods That s where we need to go Ingles I was always intrigued in reading some of your materials online about an emphasis on what many of us know and our listeners know if they ve heard our programs before on emotional intelligence

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL145_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2013 Episodes
    Movement in America When clergy and laymen concerned about the War in Vietnam asked him if he would come to Riverside Church he felt that that was just the kind of setting and situation that he needed Ingles Dr Harding were there in fact poverty programs being defunded to finance the war in Congress Harding I am not close enough to that documentation to be able to speak with intelligence about that now My comment that I would make on that is that throughout world history it has been very very clear that it is literally impossible for a country to be an imperial force in the world and at the same moment to tend to the needs of its own poorest people Ingles He didn t hold back Dr King He exposed the ugliest underbelly of the Vietnam War by offering details about what our troops were doing to the population in the South and the North in order to beat back the North Vietnamese These were descriptions that at the time in 1967 were unbeknownst to most Americans When we look for relevance in this speech to people s every day struggle with conflict there seems to be a lot to offer in these lines which follow Dr King s suggestion of empathy Harding He was speaking out of the context that comes from all of the great villages teachings Essentially he was saying have we not been taught to treat others as we would want to be treated ourselves We are all God s children Have we not been taught that that means that we are called upon to feel with others especially the deep pain that they are experiencing and especially when our own country is without justification becoming the major source of that pain King was essentially asking people to take the religion seriously He was saying there must be another way to deal with our enemies Ingles Well he goes from specific to general He does take the speech to five points to follow to end the war but then he broadens the scope One of the more powerful lines is We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing oriented society to a person oriented society He even refers to machines and computers profit motives property rights considered more important than people These words spoken by Dr King in 1967 prompt the question these many years later is there any hopeful sign that we ve even slowed a bit to the approach of the spiritual death that he referred to Harding No what I find is that there are a lot of younger people who have become very thing oriented as you know and we have made it much too easy for them to become thing oriented and to spend even so much of their time looking at things that they no longer look at other human beings but at the same moment Paul I find coming out of that whole situation also

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL129_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2015 Episodes
    And it was true In that moment I didn t have to believe the terror and so it was possible to feel all the physiological reactions and all of the contractions in the mind and say okay this is just fear Byron Katie Author 1000 Names for Joy on CHALLENGING YOUR OWN THOUGHTS The Work is a way to identify and question the thoughts that cause all the suffering in the world Everyone s suffering and anyone can do The Work if they re open to it So let s say for example I believed he doesn t care about me The first question is Is it true So I m beginning to question the thought He doesn t care about me The second question Can I absolutely know that it s true he doesn t care about me And then I notice how the mind begins to flood me with proof and images to convince me that it s true and just to notice and wait and to allow another answer to surface And then that third question How do you react when you believe that thought And the fourth question Who would you be without that thought Then I invite people to turn it around to the opposite He doesn t care about me The opposite would be I don t care about me and that s a mind blower It s like how can I expect people to care about me if I don t even care about me Then I find the ways that I don t care about me and it wakes me up to them and I m shocked And then another opposite or turn around would be I don t care about him and I begin to identify where that s true and then immediately I m awake to it and my behavior changes and it s nothing I have to do So my behavior with that person and everyone it radically shifts because we re working on original cause and mind is original cause Mind is cause Sadness is always a sign that you re believing a stressful thought that isn t true for you Conventional wisdom says differently but the truth is that sadness isn t rational it isn t a natural response and it can t ever help you It just indicates the loss of reality the loss of the awareness of love Former Army Captain Author Paul Chappell on EMPATHIZING WITH THE OTHER So the thing about waging peace is that you respect others as human beings and your opponent is ignorance hatred greed misunderstanding and you want to attack those things and defeat those things If you hate the people exhibiting these characteristics hate them back or if you demonize them you actually magnify their hatred Because if you look at Martin Luther King Jr he was getting dozens of death threats a day his house was bombed he was arrested multiple times he was eventually killed but

    Original URL path: http://www.goodradioshows.org/peaceTalksL152_transcript.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Good Radio Shows: 2010 Episodes

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