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  • The New Groundwater Sustainability Plans: What's Required and What's Needed 09/02/2015
    for Discounted Hotel Reservations is August 17 2015 Description The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act SGMA was signed into law September 16 2014 and became effective January 1 2015 SGMA requires that approximately 100 high and medium priority basins form Groundwater Sustainability Agencies GSAs that are required to develop new Groundwater Sustainability Plans GSPs by January 31 2020 or 2020 depending upon whether the basin is considered subject to critical conditions of overdraft or not A fundamental key purpose of the new plans is to make conditions in the basin sustainable within 20 years and also to develop planning and forecasting on a 50 year planning horizon The new plans are at a minimum required to include physical characteristics of the aquifer system historical and projected water demands map of existing and potential recharge areas measureable objectives and milestones to achieve sustainability within 20 years monitoring and management and mitigation of overdraft The SGMA also requires that GSAs consider the interests of all beneficial uses and users of groundwater as well as other Groundwater Sustainability Plans GSPs Public outreach and stakeholder involvement is clearly underscored in the SGMA and requires a clear framework of organization and thoughtful processes in place during

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/sgma090215.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • GRA Course: Principles of Groundwater Flow & Transport Modeling - September 9-11, 2015 - San Diego, CA
    and those in the legal community specialized on groundwater issues Participants should have a working knowledge of the principles of groundwater hydrology and be familiar with the PC Windows environment No formal training in computer programming is necessary Course Topics principles and concepts of groundwater modeling overview of groundwater modeling software conceptual model development data collection and preparation model grid design boundary conditions concepts and application implementing rivers lakes recharge drainage and other special situations modeling multiple aquifer systems sensitivity analysis model calibration and verification contaminant transport modeling capture zone analysis nonpoint source pollution modeling Course Instructors Graham E Fogg Ph D is a professor of hydrogeology with the Hydrology Program of the Department of Land Air and Water Resources University of California Davis He received a B S in hydrology at the University of New Hampshire a M S in hydrology from the University of Arizona and a Ph D in geology from The University of Texas at Austin He is currently teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in groundwater hydrology and groundwater modeling His research interests include geologic geostatistical characterization of subsurface heterogeneity mass transport in heterogeneous porous media numerical modeling of groundwater systems and regional system hydrogeology Fogg has 20 years experience characterizing and analyzing groundwater under a diversity of conditions in the southwest and western United States Thomas Harter Ph D received a B S in hydrology from the Universities of Freiburg Germany and a M S in hydrology from the University of Stuttgart Germany He received his Ph D in hydrology with emphasis on subsurface hydrology at the University of Arizona In 1995 he joined the faculty at the Department of Land Air and Water Resources University of California Davis Harter is in charge of the University of California Cooperative Extension Groundwater Hydrology Program His research

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/modeling2015.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • NASA-ISRO SAR Mission Applications Workshop: Linking The Applied Science Community to Mission Data
    assessment urban and structural monitoring permafrost degradation wetlands water level change ocean wind measurements sea ice motion and ship detection sea level rise vegetation disturbances groundwater induced land deformation and agricultural land use The NASA ISRO SAR mission NISAR an L and S band SAR satellite with a global observation plan is engaging the applied science community in annual workshops the second of which will be held in October 2015 This workshop will focus on constructing a 5 year roadmap for developing the suite of products and software to support the needs of the diverse NISAR applied science enduser community and to clearly establish guidelines with regard to Project support of applications and data latency to clearly set expectations To develop this roadmap we will identify current and planned activities for communities of practice groups already using SAR data to support their management or decision making needs and communities of potential groups with ideas or prototypes for using SAR data Workshop participants will identify key activities e g research technology development software or product development training campaigns that can be used to guide NASA and the NISAR project as well as other agencies and private sector investments in the years

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/nasa-isro.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • GRACast Web Seminar - No Surface Water = No Groundwater
    century Building deeper wells is not a solution to a shortage of surface water Developing a water budget and managing water use within that budget is a solution Carl will talk about a number of topics that must be considered when a rational program of water management is developed and he will emphasize that whether the water is above the land surface or below the land surface it is the same water Labeling it groundwater or surface water is a human construct that represents where the water is at that moment in time They are not different sources Register Today Early Registration by October 16 is 75 for Members and 100 for Non Members Registration after October 16 is 100 for Members and 125 for Non Members SPEAKER AND MODERATOR BIOS Carl Hauge retired as Chief Hydrogeologist for the Department of Water Resources in Sacramento Previously he worked in both the South Central and the North Central Region offices on dam site exploration groundwater water management and well standards He has worked on numerous groundwater and surface water studies timber harvest practices earthquake studies and a study of subsidence in a part of San Joaquin Valley in the 1960s In addition to the Department of Water Resources he has worked with Department of Forestry and Fire Control State Board of Forestry and the California Geological Survey MODERATOR BIO Timothy K Parker is Principal Hydrogeologist Parker Groundwater Management California specializing in groundwater resources assessment development and management for public and private sector clients His experience includes water policy analysis strategic water resources planning groundwater management plan development and program implementation regional and project scale groundwater monitoring for quantity and quality and groundwater recharge and storage projects He formerly worked for Schlumberger Water Services bringing advanced oil and gas industry tools and

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/gracast/gracast102115.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • GRACast Web Seminar - Transition to Online Well Completion Report Submissions to the California Department of Water Resources
    construct a new well or modify or destroy and existing well These reports are the primary source of information for hydrogeologic investigations in the state Historically these reports have been submitted on paper and DWR has about 800 000 of them on file Beginning in October 2015 drillers will be able to submit WCRs online This presents an overview of DWR s well completion report program summarizes the history of the well completion reporting process and demonstrates the new Online System for Well Completion Reports Recent changes to the California Water Code governing the confidentiality of the reports will also be discussed Register Today Early Registration by October 23 is 75 for Members and 100 for Non Members Registration after October 23 is 100 for Members and 125 for Non Members SPEAKER BIO Eric Senter is a Senior Engineering Geologist with the California Department of Water Resources in the Division of Statewide Integrated Water Management s Data Publication Exchange and Management Section Eric graduated with his Bachelor of Science in Geology from UC Davis This GRACast will use a conference call for audio and WebEx to display the presentation slides Each registration is allowed access via one phone line and

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/gracast/gracast102815.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • Naturally Occurring Compounds of Regulatory Concern Symposium 11/18-19/2015
    California groundwater Metals such as chromium arsenic and uranium are naturally occurring and are commonly detected in groundwater at problematic concentrations Recent studies also show that nitrate and perchlorate accumulate naturally in arid climates such as the American Southwest Even many organic compounds such as benzene methane and tert butyl ether TBA a gasoline oxygenate are naturally occurring in California groundwater While these compounds are naturally occurring the compounds may become mobilized or exhibit increased concentrations as a result of human activities For example naturally occurring dissolved salts once largely sequestered in fine grained sediment in the San Joaquin Valley have been mobilized by changes in vertical hydraulic gradients brought on by decades of irrigation and groundwater pumping Exposure of stable trivalent chromium to oxidizing agents converts trivalent chromium to more mobile toxic hexavalent chromium which is also naturally occurring Injection of oxygenated recharge water in Aquifer Storage and Recovery ASR projects can dissolve arsenic bearing minerals thereby increasing dissolved arsenic concentrations in the recovered groundwater Some of these compounds may pose health risks while other naturally occurring compounds are objectionable due to taste and odor Naturally occurring substances such as dissolved iron and manganese TDS calcium and magnesium hardness sulfate algae dissolved organic matter and hydrogen polysulfide from chlorination of sulfide bearing water can impart objectionable taste or odor to water supplies Aesthetic impacts such as these can be particularly troublesome for water purveyors who strive to provide drinking water at the lowest possible cost This symposium will focus on the occurrence forensic evaluation toxicology and regulation of naturally occurring chemical compounds in California groundwater Particular attention will be focused on sustainable management practices that help ensure that these constituents remain below evolving threshold concentration limits Session 1 Dissolved metals and radionuclides e g chromium arsenic uranium selenium Session

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/nocrc2015.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • San Francisco Bay Area Branch News and Events - California Groundwater Resources Association
    person Please RSVP by Monday November 30 2015 Register now by credit card online or mail payment checks payable to PEMA to PEMA c o Eric Sandberg 1436 2nd Street PMB 250 Napa CA 94579 Register Now Donate a raffle item and receive special recognition at the event Sponsor the Event Event Sponsorships cost of 200 and include your company logo on all promotional materials and displays including a shared

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/branches/sanfrancisco120315.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • GRACast Web Seminar - Accessing Funding for Groundwater Under Proposition 1
    to partially fund water storage projects such as local and regional surface storage groundwater storage and cleanup and reservoir reoperation Bond funds will go to â public benefitsâ of projects such as improved water quality flood control habitat restoration and emergency response Regional Water Reliability 810 million Provides funding for water conservation storm water capture and other programs that increase local and regional water supplies and provide other benefits Speakers will provide an overview of the timing and availability of funding for each Prop 1 program relevant to groundwater Speakers will also highlight anticipated application requirements and discuss venues for obtaining more information about specific Prop 1 programs Register Today Early Registration by December 4 is 75 for Members and 100 for Non Members Registration after December 4 is 100 for Members and 125 for Non Members SPEAKER AND MODERATOR BIOS Tracie Billington PE Chief of Financial Assistance BranchDepartment of Water Resources Integrated Regional Water Management IRWM Division Ms Billington manages a variety of water management grant programs including the Integrated Regional Water Management Grant Program She has worked for DWR since 2000 Prior to joining DWR Ms Billington worked in the hazardous waste field She has an Environmental Resource Engineering degree from Humboldt State University and is a registered Civil Engineer Joe Karkoski PE Supervising Water Resources Control Engineer State Water Resources Control Board Mr Karkoski is manager of the Bond Section in the Division of Financial Assistance for the State Water Resources Control Board Mr Karkoski s section is responsible for developing project selection guidelines developing project recommendations in coordination with other agencies State Water Board programs and regional water boards establishing grant agreements for selected projects and providing project oversight to ensure the successful completion of grants Funds and programs include Groundwater Sustainability Storm Water Clean Beaches

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/gracast/gracast120915.asp (2016-05-02)
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