archive-org.com » ORG » G » GRAC.ORG

Total: 141

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • GRA-Cast Web Seminar on 5/8/2013: Quantitative Analysis & Visualization of Conceptual Site Models
    advances in 1 4 dioxane remediation The regulatory policy for 1 4 dioxane cleanup levels and drinking water advisory levels varies widely among U S states and countries around the world In 2010 US EPA published a toxicological review of 1 4 dioxane recommending a steeper cancer slope factor effectively lowering the drinking water advisory level for 1 4 dioxane Accordingly California and Illinois lowered their drinking water guidance levels to 1 µg L while Massachusetts set their guidance at 0 3 µg L The Groundwater Resources Association of California is proud to present a 90 minute webinar on this important and challenging contaminant by Thomas Mohr on June 4th at 12 PM Pacific Standard Time 7 00p GMT The topical agenda for the webinar is listed below information for registration is posted online at http www grac org dioxane AGENDA Outline for the 1 4 Dioxane Webinar by Thomas Mohr 1 Contaminant Archeology of 1 4 Dioxane Uses and Occurrence The Role of Solvent Stabilizers in Chlorinated Solvents Direct Uses of 1 4 Dioxane and its Occurrence in By products Occurrence of 1 4 Dioxane in Recycled Water and Drinking Water 2 Chemical Properties of 1 4 Dioxane Governing Fate and Transport Chemical Structures of 1 4 Dioxane and Physical and Chemical Properties of 1 4 Dioxane Fate and Transport of 1 4 Dioxane Overview of Intrinsic Biodegradability Bacterial Strains Direct Metabolism Co Metabolism Fungi and Evidence for Occurrence Under Ambient Conditions 3 Laboratory Analysis of 1 4 Dioxane Challenges and Solutions Comparison of Laboratory Methods for 1 4 Dioxane Analysis 4 Field Examples Plume Dynamics and 1 4 Dioxane Treatment Challenges and Cost s Relative Rates of Migration Consequences of Late Discovery of 1 4 Dioxane at a Solvent Release Site Consequences of 1 4 Dioxane in Recycled Water 1 4 Dioxane remediation in the unsaturated zone 5 Myth busting Common misconceptions about 1 4 Dioxane 1 4 Dioxane Was a Stabilizer for 1 1 1 TCA and other chlorinated solvents 1 4 Dioxane Occurs Naturally in Chicken Shrimp Tomatoes and other Foods There s No Federal State Standard the Regulator Won t Require 1 4 Dioxane Cleanup 1 4 Dioxane is a Good Candidate for Natural Attenuation The Monitoring Well Network Designed to Delineate the Chlorinated Solvent Plume is Sufficient to Characterize 1 4 Dioxane And more send your questions in advance SPEAKER BIO Thomas Mohr works at the Santa Clara Valley Water District as Senior Hydrogeologist where he manages county wide groundwater monitoring and salt and nutrient management plans and was previously the District s Solvents and Toxics Cleanup Liaison He was the principal investigator for the District s Study of Potential for Groundwater Contamination from Past Dry Cleaner Operations in Santa Clara County and was the District s project manager on a major perchlorate case that impacted hundreds of domestic wells Mohr is the principal author of the book Environmental Investigation and Remediation 1 4 dioxane and Other Solvent Stabilizers in the Environment Mohr DiGuiseppi

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/qavcast.asp (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Managed Aquifer Recharge in the Urban Environment Symposium - May 22-23, 2013 - Burlingame, CA
    and risk management for these different uses with different levels of human exposure Risk assessments have also been performed at several other stormwater harvesting locations where water quality data allow as a means of testing the broader applicability of the methodology When completed the work will inform a stormwater masterplan for Adelaide which currently projects 60Mm3 yr 16M gallons yr of stormwater harvesting and will provide generic guidance on methods to evaluate alternative candidates for safe use of stormwater harvesting systems including those involving managed aquifer recharge Optional Dinner Presentation on May 22 at 8PM Managed aquifer recharge in Australia drivers and progress In Australia infiltration basins and sand dams commenced in the 1970 s to sustain irrigation in rural coastal areas and the recharged volume has remained stable since at about 40 Mm3 yr 10Mg yr In Australian cities managed aquifer recharge is still in its infancy with 30 small projects contributing about 20 Mm3 yr 5Mg yr to urban water supplies and potential for more than 250 Mm3 yr 66Mg yr This could reach 25 of total supples in several cities predominantly through recycling of treated sewage effluent and stormwater via fresh and brackish aquifers In resource industries current groundwater replenishment is nearly 20 Mm3 yr 5Mg yr and expected to quadruple To underpin advances seven initiatives were identified and these are in various stages of maturity They are provision of maps and information on aquifers local demonstration projects development of technical skills guidelines to protect human health and the environment coherent water allocation policies improved integration of water resources management functions and reform in urban water supply planning Novel features of progress in each area will be described briefly with an emphasis on two of the most innovative elements These are the risk based water quality guidelines on managed aquifer recharge developed and published jointly by Commonwealth and State Governments in 2009 as part of the National Water Quality Management Strategy and the water allocation policy framework with tradeable entitlements to recharge credits Symposium Focus Please join us for a 1 5 day technical and policy symposium focusing on managed aquifer recharge in the urban environment The Symposium will be co presented by ReNUWIt Re inventing the Nation s Urban Water Infrastructure an interdisciplinary multi institution National Science Foundation engineering research center with the goal to change update and improve the ways in which urban water is managed http urbanwatererc org Symposium collaborators include Stanford s Water in the West program http www stanford edu group waterinthewest and the Berkeley Water Center http bwc berkeley edu The Symposium will emphasize the growing range of approaches to the capture and recharge of urban stormwater recharge of aquifers with reclaimed water reduction of the footprint and energy needs for recharge and water quality issues associated with managed aquifer recharge Additionally the Symposium will examine technical and policy challenges related to current and planned small and large scale projects as well as strategies for increasing managed aquifer recharge to help

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/aquiferrecharge.asp (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • GRA-Cast Web Seminar on 6/4/2013: 1,4-Dioxane – the Emerging Contaminant that Keeps On Emerging
    recent and important technical advances in 1 4 dioxane remediation The regulatory policy for 1 4 dioxane cleanup levels and drinking water advisory levels varies widely among U S states and countries around the world In 2010 US EPA published a toxicological review of 1 4 dioxane recommending a steeper cancer slope factor effectively lowering the drinking water advisory level for 1 4 dioxane Accordingly California and Illinois lowered their drinking water guidance levels to 1 µg L while Massachusetts set their guidance at 0 3 µg L The Groundwater Resources Association of California is proud to present a 90 minute webinar on this important and challenging contaminant by Thomas Moh r on June 4th at 12 PM Pacific Standard Time 7 00p GMT The topical agenda for the webinar is listed below Outline for the 1 4 Dioxane Webinar by Thomas Mohr 1 Contaminant Archeology of 1 4 Dioxane Uses and Occurrence The Role of Solvent Stabilizers in Chlorinated Solvents Direct Uses of 1 4 Dioxane and its Occurrence in By products Occurrence of 1 4 Dioxane in Recycled Water and Drinking Water 2 Chemical Properties of 1 4 Dioxane Governing Fate and Transport Chemical Structures of 1 4 Dioxane and Physical and Chemical Properties of 1 4 Dioxane Fate and Transport of 1 4 Dioxane Overview of Intrinsic Biodegradability Bacterial Strains Direct Metabolism Co Metabolism Fungi and Evidence for Occurrence Under Ambient Conditions 3 Laboratory Analysis of 1 4 Dioxane Challenges and Solutions Comparison of Laboratory Methods for 1 4 Dioxane Analysis 4 Field Examples Plume Dynamics and 1 4 Dioxane Treatment Challenges and Cost s Relative Rates of Migration Consequences of Late Discovery of 1 4 Dioxane at a Solvent Release Site Consequences of 1 4 Dioxane in Recycled Water 1 4 Dioxane remediation in the unsaturated zone 5 Myth busting Common misconceptions about 1 4 Dioxane 1 4 Dioxane Was a Stabilizer for 1 1 1 TCA and other chlorinated solvents 1 4 Dioxane Occurs Naturally in Chicken Shrimp Tomatoes and other Foods There s No Federal State Standard the Regulator Won t Require 1 4 Dioxane Cleanup 1 4 Dioxane is a Good Candidate for Natural Attenuation The Monitoring Well Network Designed to Delineate the Chlorinated Solvent Plume is Sufficient to Characterize 1 4 Dioxane And more send your questions in advance 6 Q A and Discussion SPEAKER BIO Thomas Mohr works at the Santa Clara Valley Water District as Senior Hydrogeologist where he manages county wide groundwater monitoring and salt and nutrient management plans and was previously the District s Solvents and Toxics Cleanup Liaison He was the principal investigator for the District s Study of Potential for Groundwater Contamination from Past Dry Cleaner Operations in Santa Clara County and was the District s project manager on a major perchlorate case that impacted hundreds of domestic wells Mohr is the principal author of the book Environmental Investigation and Remediation 1 4 dioxane and Other Solvent Stabilizers in the Environment Mohr DiGuiseppi Stickney published by

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dioxane.asp (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Collaborative Leadership: Negotiating Relationships to Improve Groundwater Planning Workshop - November 4, 2013 - Sacramento, CA
    flood protection groundwater conservation wetlands fire fuels management public safety and forest carnivores His areas of expertise include conflict assessment and resolution collaborative visioning strategic planning technical joint fact finding and facilitation and collaborative leadership training His work has involved a wide range of forums including executive bodies and summits citizens advisory committees multi year consensus building projects large scale public engagement events and science intensive workshops Dorian has been with the Center since 2007 and has co led its Professional Development Series He is on the National Roster of Environmental Dispute Resolution and Consensus Building Professionals and a member of IAP2 Northern California Chapter the National Coalition for Dialogue and Deliberation Mediators Beyond Borders the American Society for Public Administration and other professional associations Dr Fougères completed his PhD at UC Berkeley in 2005 after spending six years working on the political ecology of coral reefs and mangroves in Indonesia Celeste Cantú joined the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority SAWPA five years ago and has been working on the crest to coast corner to corner Integrated Regional Watershed Management Plan called One Water One Watershed OWOW that addresses all water related issues joins all entities and hundreds of stakeholders seeking to create a new vision of sustainability for the Santa Ana River Watershed SAWPA owns the Inland Empire Brine Line a utility that collects salt from the upper watershed groundwater to improve water quality in the Santa Ana River and benefits the lower watershed Celeste served as the Executive Director for the California State Water Resources Control Board which is responsible for water rights and water quality for the State During the Clinton Administration Celeste served as the USDA Rural Development State Director for California Celeste was born and raised in the Imperial Valley to a pioneer family There she served first as Planning Director for her hometown Calexico and later as Executive Director for the Imperial Valley Housing Authority Celeste has a BA from Yale in Urban Planning and Policy and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard s Kennedy School of Government She lives in Temecula with her husband Dr Barry Stampfl an English Professor at SDSU Imperial Valley Campus They have two sons Dave Ceppos is an Associate Director and Managing Senior Mediator with the Center for Collaborative Policy With 28 years of experience Dave has a comprehensive background developing consensus based stakeholder driven resource management processes He has considerable management and field experience in watershed planning ecological assessment hydrology hazardous waste management and habitat restoration Dave is the managing mediator and process designer of the Department of Water Resources Water Use Efficiency Program overseeing comprehensive Urban and Agricultural Stakeholder Committees and Subcommittees implementing the SBX7 7 Water Conservation Act the legislatively mandated Commercial Industrial and Institutional Task Force and the Independent Technical Panel on demand management measures He is the Program Manager for stakeholder and mediation efforts on numerous water quality efforts including several Total Maximum Daily Load cases nutrient management strategies and Irrigated Lands

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/collaborativeleadership.asp (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • GRA-Cast Web Seminar on 12/11/2013: Department of Defense Perspective and a Case Study
    to track performance against established baseline conditions to verify proposed performance goals Additional details on the progress to date internal surveillance processes and the Air Force Complex Site Initiative will be discussed 3 Use of Mass Discharge as a Performance Metric in CERCLA Decision Documents A Case Study 30 min presentation plus Q A Kira Lynch US EPA Region 10 This presentation will focus on a case study Time Oil Well 12A Site where mass flux and mass discharge were used as a performance metric The site is located in Tacoma WA The source of contamination at the site named after the city production well where contamination was originally detected is located beneath an old industrial building and surroundings contaminated with the disposal of petroleum hydrocarbons solvents and paint wastes The site is located over a major aquifer used by the City of Tacoma for its water supply The site has had a pump and treat system since 1988 had a soil vapor extraction system installed in the 1990 s soil excavations for large sources in the unsaturated soil zone at different times and now is in the process of having a thermal treatment and an enhanced bio remediation component to attempt to remediate the main source of DNAPL from the saturated zones below the main source building and surroundings Many CERCLA decision documents for DNAPL site remediation lack clear remedial action objectives for determining and documenting when sufficient source treatment has been completed Mass flux and mass discharge can be used as a performance metrics in decision documents to document when source treatment is considered complete and long term groundwater restoration projects can be considered operational and functional In addition mass flux and mass discharge measurements can be used to help characterize sites and refine the site conceptual model so that remedial options can be optimized However mass flux and mass discharge measurements can be expensive and accurate measurements require site managers to have a good understanding of groundwater flow and hydraulic conductivity Further many EPA and State regulators are not familiar with setting groundwater remedial goals that are not concentration based estimates and how mass flux and mass discharge goals can be utilized in long term plume management strategies with remedial action objectives goals of meeting Maximum Contaminant Levels MCLs This presentation will discuss the advantages and drawbacks of utilizing mass flux and mass discharge to assist with the characterization design and performance assessment of remedial actions from a regulator s perspective 4 Question Answers Moderated by Rula Deeb Ph D BCEEM Geosyntec Consultants SPEAKER BIOS Dr Anderson received his Ph D in Soil Science with graduate minor in Statistics from The Ohio State University in 2008 and MS BS in Environmental Science from Oklahoma State University in 2005 and 2002 respectively Following his PhD work at The Ohio State University Dr Anderson worked as a post doctoral researcher for US EPA in the Cincinnati OH division of the National Center for Environmental Assessment NCEA under the Office

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/scs2.asp (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive



  •