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  • Contact GRA - Submit Questions, Feedback
    hosting a lecture next year please use the form below to contact the organizing committee DKT Contact Form Your Name Organization Company City State Email required for reply Phone optional Are You A GRA Member Yes No Comments Questions GRAC

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dktcontact.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • David Keith Todd Distinguished Lecture Series to honor Dr. Todd for his contributions to groundwater science and technology
    the recognized leader in promoting global land subsidence studies Abstract Land subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal in California particularly in the San Joaquin Valley has recently received increased attention from water science professionals and the media because two recent droughts 2007â 09 and 2012â present have triggered high rates of groundwater withdrawal and historically high rates of land subsidence as much as about 1 foot per year The compaction of susceptible aquifer systems caused by excessive groundwater pumping is the single largest cause of subsidence in California and the 5 200 square miles affected by subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley during the better part of the 20th century has been identified as the single largest human alteration of the Earth s surface topography In some areas that historically depend on surface water resources groundwater pumping has increased during periods of drought to compensate for reduced surface water availability resulting in large and rapid groundwater level declines In some areas where surface water is a minor component of the water supply or where land use has changed to more water intensive uses groundwater levels have declined during both drought and non drought periods While more focus has been placed on the highly visible infrastructure damage from subsidence which generally can be repaired compaction of the aquifer system sight unseen permanently decreases its capacity to store water such that subsidence occurring today is a legacy for all tomorrows This presentation will include discussions of subsidence processes measurements analyses and consequences by exploring selected case studies throughout California including the San Joaquin Valley the Coachella Valley and or the Mojave Desert John Izbicki Ph D Southern California Research Hydrologist United States Geological Survey Lecture Title Using Disparate Process Oriented Data to Solve Hydrologic Problems Bio Dr John Izbicki has worked for the U S Geological Survey for more than 30 years in Maryland Massachusetts and California In 2000 while working for the USGS he obtained his Ph D in Soil Physics from University of California Riverside Within California Dr Izbicki s studies have focused on understanding the physical hydrology of coastal and desert aquifer systems primarily through the application of chemical and isotopic tracers Recent work includes studies of managed aquifer recharge trace element occurrence and management in aquifers submarine groundwater discharge and bacterial source identification in urban streams and near shore ocean water Dr Izbicki has several patents published more than 100 U S Geological Survey reports and journal articles and worked with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Indian Government Abstract Groundwater hydrologists have traditionally incorporated data from a wide range of disciplines into their work often skillfully integrating geology chemistry physics and other disciplines to solve hydrologic problems Information from each discipline has strengths and limitations collaboration between scientists having different skill sets can help interpret the disparate data sets developed by scientists from diverse backgrounds These data sets are often process oriented and may incorporate results from laboratory and field scale experiments or integrate high frequency data

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dkt2015.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • David Keith Todd Distinguished Lecture Series to honor Dr. Todd for his contributions to groundwater science and technology
    and succinctly discussed numerous issues relating to groundwater He spoke about actions in the past that have affected groundwater management in California for the past century and other issues relating to groundwater that have been overlooked Do other states manage their groundwater better than California As Carl suggested that may be an open question Groundwater substitution will affect stream flow in the Sacramento Valley over the long term i e years or decades Can streamflow depletion be predicted quantified and controlled Why is the hyporheic zone important And why are landowners allowed to pump groundwater even when such pumping causes subsidence The severe drought and recent legislation have publicized the need for better management of groundwater but are those actions enough Does your basin have a water budget Carlâ s lecture tour concluded just after the signing of Californiaâ s three groundwater bills which created a framework for sustainable local groundwater management for the first time in the stateâ s history The implication of this new legislation was discussed in Carlâ s final lecture Dr Jay Famiglietti Southern California Professor of Earth System Science and of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of California Irvine Director UC Center for Hydrologic Modeling Lecture Title Water in the Balance Observing Groundwater Depletion from Space Bio As Founding Director of the UC Center for Hydrologic Modeling Dr Famiglietti and his research team use satellites to track water availability and groundwater depletion on land and have been working for many years towards improving hydrological prediction in climate models like those used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Before joining UCI in 2001 Dr Famiglietti was a faculty member in Geological Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin where he helped launch the UT Environmental Science Institute He is the past Chair of the

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dkt2014.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • David Keith Todd Distinguished Lecture Series to honor Dr. Todd for his contributions to groundwater science and technology
    He is a frequent contributor to http www CaliforniaWaterBlog com Abstract Integrating groundwater into overall water and environmental management is critical to California s water future Groundwater is a major water source and storage mechanism for most of the state Cities farms and ecosystems depend on it for both water supply and water quality Over time groundwater s role has changed from an isolated and convenient source of clean water to an increasingly contaminated and diminishing source with increasing effects on surface water bodies users and ecosystems Lowered water tables overdraft and accumulations of salts nitrate and other contaminants have brought widespread effects to almost every part of the state This talk reviewed groundwater s diverse roles in water management in California current and growing issues for groundwater supply and management and promising approaches to integrating groundwater into broader water and environmental management along with surface water demands and infrastructure Political and scientific challenges for accomplishing such management were also discussed David Huntley Ph D Southern California Professor Emeritus Deptartment of Geological Sciences San Diego State University Associate Editor of Journals Ground Water and Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation Two Lectures The movement of light non aqueous phase liquids through the years a risk perspective And Dissolution from a field scale non aqueous phase liquid and the implications with respect to the evolution and longevity of dissolved phase plumes Bio After obtaining his B A degree in Geology at University of California Santa Barbara in 1972 and his Ph D in Geological Engineering from Colorado School of Mines in 1976 Dave Huntley taught graduate and undergraduate classes in groundwater hydrology for two years at University of Connecticut and 29 years at San Diego State University Over that same period he has investigated and published on applications of remote sensing to groundwater studies hydrogeologic controls on geothermal systems groundwater flow and resources in fractured crystalline rock geophysical applications to groundwater studies aquifer testing in granular and fractured rock aquifers and the effects of geologic heterogeneity on dissolved phase solute transport His most recent research has focused on assessing the mobility of non aqueous phase liquids NAPLs and field scale dissolution of multicomponent NAPLs He is currently Associate Editor of the journals Ground Water and Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation In addition to his research and journal activities he is a private consultant for both industry and regulatory agencies throughout the country Abstract Natural attenuation of dissolved phase contaminants is widely recognized and consideration of it has become a standard part of assessing the risk of future contamination Stabilization of the footprint of a dissolved phase plume as a result of natural attenuation is well understood Much attention has turned to the source of many of the dissolved phase plumes a non aqueous phase liquid NAPL with significant soluble components Both regulatory agencies and responsible parties want to know the velocity of the NAPL whether the NAPL footprint is likely to expand and if so the future extent of the NAPL Remediation

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dkt2013.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • David Keith Todd Distinguished Lecture Series – 2012 Program
    the U K He held the Research Chair in Contaminant Hydrogeology at the University of Waterloo 1996 2006 and is currently the Director of the University Consortium for Field Focused Groundwater Contamination Research established in 1988 and is an adjunct professor in the School of Engineering at the University of Guelph Dr Cherry received GRA s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award Abstract Most sedimentary hydrogeologic systems are comprised of two types of units aquifers and aquitards While groundwater is drawn from aquifers for beneficial uses aquitards typically govern the sustainable yields and land subsidence and provide some protection from contamination Aquifers have received nearly all of the research and they dominate groundwater education However aquitards frequently have greater influence on the groundwater system behaviors both hydrologic and geochemical Aquitards composed of clayey sediment typically contain water of â geologic ageâ many thousands of years old or older especially in settings where fractures do not control groundwater flow However where networks of connected fractures dominate aquitards then become part of the active flow system Recent studies show that hydraulically active fractures are often much deeper than expected and for most aquitards determination of the depth and hydrogeologic nature of the fractures is of critical importance especially given the worldwide relevance of aquitards for isolation of hazardous and high level nuclear waste and containment of the impacts of fracking for shale exploitation This talk used field examples to illustrate why aquitards are at least as important in hydrogeology as aquifers and are arguably more interesting The talk examined the contaminant hydrogeology of some Holocene aquitards in Louisiana and China Pleistocene aquitards in Ontario and Manitoba and the nature of some older sedimentary rock aquitards in the United States and Canada William Alley Ph D Southern California U S Geological Survey Emeritus Lecture Communicating

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dkt2012.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • David Keith Todd Distinguished Lecture Series – 2011 Program
    analytical studies of the economics of groundwater management He engaged in experiments utilizing water wells as strain meters at Parkfield Californnia and in studies of the hydrodynamics of deep sedimentary basins In recent years he has also worked on studies of contaminant movement and nuclear waste disposal He has received numerous awards including the Horton Medal of the American Geophysical Union the highest award given to a hydrologist the Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America the highest award given to a geologist and GRA s 2004 Lifetime Achievement Award Abstract For 2011 the Northern California lecturer was Dr John Bredehoeft of The Hydrodynamics Group For 32 years Dr Bredehoeft devoted time to scientific research and high level management positions with the U S Geological Survey USGS In 1995 when he retired as a senior research geologist from the USGS he established The Hydrodynamics Group located in Sausalito where he continues to offer consulting services While at the USGS Dr Bredehoeft and his colleague George Pinder developed and published the first widely utilized numerical groundwater flow model for which they received the Horton Award of the American Geophysical Union They also developed the first widely used contaminant transport model for which they received the Meinzer Award of the Geological Society of America In addition to doing research with the USGS Dr Bredehoeft has held a number of teaching positions he has taught at the University of Illinois Stanford University the University of California at Santa Cruz and San Francisco State University Dr Bredehoeft presented on the topic â Conjunctive Use The Impact of Pumping Wells on a Nearby Stream â The lecture described the impact on streamflow from pumping in an alluvial aquifer This classic hydrogeology problem was first solved by Theis in 1941 with an analytical solution and using the principles of superposition Glover and Balmer simplified the analytical solution using an error function in 1954 Economic studies that Dr Bredehoeft was involved in at â Resources for the Futureâ in the 1970s demonstrated that the output from the combined system wells and stream could be doubled through effective management Dr Bredehoeft also elaborated on how the problem is still misunderstood by many hydrogeologists and many myths remain even though various investigators have addressed facets of this problem for more than 7 decades Prem Saint PhD Southern California Professor Emeritus at California State University Fullerton Lecture Groundwater A Historical and Global Perspective Bio Dr Prem Saint was involved for over 40 years in the teaching and research in groundwater hydrology water quality hazardous waste management geothermal energy and watershed management with projects in Southern California East Africa and India Dr Saint has a Ph D from the University of Minnesota and Bachelor s and Master s degree from the University of London England He also worked for the Kenya Ministry of Water Development as a hydrologist in charge of the Rift Valley Area and as a senior hydrogeologist developing groundwater supplies for urban and rural communities and for

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/dkt2011.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • Board of Directors - Groundwater Resources Association of California
    Email John McHugh term expires 12 18 Santa Clara Valley Water District 5750 Almaden Expressway San Jose CA 95118 Tel 408 630 3105 Fax 408 979 5639 Send Email Thomas Harter Bio term expires 12 16 Dept of Land Air and Water Resources University of California Davis CA 95616 Tel 530 752 1130 Fax 530 752 5262 Send Email Timothy K Parker Bio term expires 12 16 Parker Groundwater PO

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/directors.asp (2016-05-02)
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  • ERROR you can t use this script

    Original URL path: http://grac.org/formmailcontact.asp (2016-05-02)
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