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  • Management | Great Pollinator Project
    pollinators in mind whether you re a park manager urban farmer community gardener or homeowner There are a few things you need to do before you can effectively manage the landscape for pollinators First become familiar with the pollinators that live in the area Visit the other sections of this website for information on the bees and other pollinators in the New York metropolitan region and what they need to thrive You should also review your current land management gardening or farming practices This will help you determine which measures you can take to make them more pollinator friendly Food resources Promoting healthy and diverse pollinator populations with a variety of flowering plants Read more Nesting habitat How to provide nesting sites for various pollinators Read more Overwintering habitat Creating sheltered areas where pollinators can spend the winter Read more Stopover habitat Monarchs hummingbirds and other migrating pollinators need places to rest and refuel Read more Pest management How to minimize the impacts on pollinators Read more Habitat restoration How to create high quality habitats and link them together Read more Featured Resource Check out these close up images of native bees and other insects from the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab They are freely available for use by all Black and gold bumble bee Bombus auricomus Pollinator Paradise Bee populations have been burgeoning at the Highline the former elevated freight railroad spur turned floriferous park along 10 th Avenue in Manhattan from Ganesevoort Street to West 20 th Street On June 8 2011 a new stretch of the Highline opened to the public running from West 20 th Street to West 30 th Street doubling the park s length Overflowing with flowers like summersweet mountain mint butterfly weed blazingstar and beebalm it makes the Highline twice the pollinator

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/management/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Dandelion and Bee (Kevin Matteson) | Great Pollinator Project
    Pollinators Resources Conservation Major Threats To Pollinators Conservation Actions Survey and Monitoring Legal Protection Management Food Resources Nesting Habitat Overwintering Habitat Stopover Habitat Pest Management Habitat Restoration Volunteer Bee Watchers Become a Bee Watcher Other Pollinator Initiatives Education About Us

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/dandelion.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Ground-nesting Bees (Kevin Matteson) | Great Pollinator Project
    Pollinators Resources Conservation Major Threats To Pollinators Conservation Actions Survey and Monitoring Legal Protection Management Food Resources Nesting Habitat Overwintering Habitat Stopover Habitat Pest Management Habitat Restoration Volunteer Bee Watchers Become a Bee Watcher Other Pollinator Initiatives Education About Us

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/nesting.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Conservation | Great Pollinator Project
    These include Bombus affinis the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee and Bombus terricola the Yellowbanded Bumble Bee most likely due to the introduction of diseases and parasites Another bumble bee that is believed to have declined is Bombus pensylvanicus the American Bumble Bee for unknown reasons although habitat changes are thought to be a contributing factor In addition three species of Macropis oil bees appear to have drastically declined possibly due to reductions in their host plants native yellow loosestrife genus Lysimachia Unfortunately the loss of these bee species will also result in the loss of parasitic bees that are dependent on them For example the cuckoo bee Epeoloides pilosula is an obligate parasite of Macropis oil bees while Bombus ashtoni the Ashton Cuckoo Bumble Bee is an obligate parasite of Bombus affinis Although there is evidence for the decline of these and other species it is not clear if there is a broad decline in all native bees Despite a recent increase in studies of bees and other pollinators the bottom line is that we still know very little about them Major threats to pollinators Pollinators are beset by the same environmental challenges as other species Read more Conservation actions What you can do to help pollinators Read more Survey and monitoring The different types of studies used to assess the health of pollinator species and habitats Read more Legal protection A few regulations are in place at the international national regional and state level Read more Featured Resource Check out these close up images of native bees and other insects from the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab They are freely available for use by all Black and gold bumble bee Bombus auricomus Pollinator Paradise Bee populations have been burgeoning at the Highline the former elevated freight railroad spur

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/conservation/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Volunteer | Great Pollinator Project
    enable a single researcher or a small team to gather much more data over a much larger geographic area Data collected by citizen scientists can be used in many ways depending on the goals of the project Results can help improve land management for certain species or habitats inform public policy raise awareness about critical issues or help detect trends in plant or animal populations to determine how they are doing from a conservation perspective to name just a few ways your participation can help Bee Watchers Research Program Volunteers have helped researchers learn a lot more about urban pollinators Read more Links to other pollinator conservation initiatives Other ways you can participate in scientific research on pollinators and pollination Read more Featured Resource Check out these close up images of native bees and other insects from the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab They are freely available for use by all Black and gold bumble bee Bombus auricomus Pollinator Paradise Bee populations have been burgeoning at the Highline the former elevated freight railroad spur turned floriferous park along 10 th Avenue in Manhattan from Ganesevoort Street to West 20 th Street On June 8 2011 a new stretch of the Highline opened to the public running from West 20 th Street to West 30 th Street doubling the park s length Overflowing with flowers like summersweet mountain mint butterfly weed blazingstar and beebalm it makes the Highline twice the pollinator paradise It s definitely worth a visit The High Line looking south Photo by Beyond My Ken In their Own Words In 2009 volunteer Bee Watchers gathered in a focus group to talk about how the project had changed their life Here s a bit of what they said everywhere I go now I look for bees I look

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/volunteer/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Bee Watchers | Great Pollinator Project
    leaved goldenrod smooth aster bee balm woodland sunflower and annual sunflower at locations throughout the five boroughs of New York City Observed bees were assigned to one of five categories honey bee bumble bee large carpenter bee shiny green bee and other type of bee Over the four summers of observation Bee Watchers submitted almost 1 500 observations from all five boroughs of the city General Results The eight different flowers that were included in this study varied in how quickly and consistently they attracted bees They also varied in the degree to which nearby flowers and surrounding landscape influenced bee visitation For the purposes of this report we provide general findings for all flowers combined Generally focal flowers located in more natural areas parks community and private gardens were more successful at attracting bees than those in more artificial settings such as rooftop gardens window boxes and street side locations In addition focal flowers in gardens with more nectar resources e g those with more than 100 flowers were visited by more bees than those located in areas with fewer surrounding floral resources Theoretically a large number of surrounding flowers could compete for pollinators and end up reducing bee visitation to focal plants Contrary to this idea however our results indicate that an abundance of surrounding flowers facilitates increased pollination service to focal plants This suggests a magnet effect whereby increased floral resources attract an abundant and diverse pollinator community which then leads to increased pollination services for many flowers in the area Land Cover Analysis Results We also looked at the land cover tree canopy grass shrubs bare earth water buildings roads other paved surfaces around each observation point using raster files provide by New York City Department of Parks and Recreation These cover types were ultimately grouped

    Original URL path: http://greatpollinatorproject.org/volunteer/bee-watchers/ (2016-05-02)
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