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  • The Next Phase of the Great Rivers Partnership Takes Shape - News & Community
    the world to bring about real change to benefit people and nature Thank you for your interest in the Great Rivers Partnership Brian McPeek Chief Operating Officer The Nature Conservancy Chair GRP International Steering Committee Michael Reuter Director The Nature Conservancy s North America Freshwater Program and Great Rivers Partnership Tags Add Comment Items on this list require content approval Your submission will not appear in public views until approved by someone with proper rights More information on content approval Title Body Full Name Attachments Hidden Blog Tools Something Missing Is there information that you think should become part of our knowledge share Recommend Looking for More Scientific Resources The Nature Conservancy offers tools to guide freshwater conservation Explore Copyright 2012 The Nature Conservancy Privacy Policy Terms of Use The Nature Conservancy is a nonprofit tax exempt charitable organization under Section 501 c 3 of the Internal Revenue Code Donations are tax deductible as allowed by law Quick Launch Categories Category 1 Category 2 Category 3 Manage Subscriptions layouts images ReportServer Manage Subscription gif en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ManageSubscriptions aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x80 0x0 FileType rdl 350 Manage Data Sources en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer DataSourceList aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x20 FileType rdl 351 Manage Shared Datasets en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer DatasetList aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x20 FileType rdl 352 Manage Parameters en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ParameterList aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rdl 353 Manage Processing Options en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ReportExecution aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rdl 354 Manage Cache Refresh Plans en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer CacheRefreshPlanList aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rdl 355 View Report History en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ReportHistory aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x40 FileType rdl 356 View Dependent Items en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer DependentItems aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rsds 350 Edit Data Source Definition en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer SharedDataSource aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rsds 351 View Dependent Items en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer DependentItems aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType smdl 350 Manage Clickthrough Reports en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ModelClickThrough aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType smdl 352 Manage Model Item Security en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer ModelItemSecurity aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x2000000 FileType smdl 353 Regenerate Model en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer GenerateModel aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType smdl 354 Manage Data Sources en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer DataSourceList aspx list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x20 FileType smdl 351 Load in Report Builder en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer RSAction aspx RSAction ReportBuilderModelContext list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x2 FileType smdl 250 Edit in Report Builder layouts images ReportServer EditReport gif en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer RSAction aspx RSAction ReportBuilderReportContext list ListId ID ItemId 0x0 0x4 FileType rdl 250 Edit in Report Builder en us NewsAndCommunity layouts ReportServer RSAction aspx RSAction ReportBuilderDatasetContext

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/NewsAndCommunity/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=70a7462c-0940-4602-ab68-f87fdad1d537&ID=70&Web=41c81e50-eadd-4d65-b67e-f88f3c522957 (2016-02-15)
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  • Zambezi River Basin
    2 575 kilometers the Zambezi River emerges from a wetland in Zambia s northwest corner and winds through varied terrain until flowing into the Indian Ocean With its tributaries the Zambezi represents Africa s fourth largest river supporting more than 30 million people in its basin and traversing numerous political boundaries People living in the basin rely on agriculture for their livelihood and some depend on healthy fisheries for food as well The Zambezi also provides important habitat for a myriad of wildlife including hippos crocodiles black rhinos and more than 200 species of fish The river system fuels Victoria Falls one of the world s greatest natural wonders as well as the Kariba and Cahora Bassa dams two of Africa s largest hydroelectric projects While hydropower is considered by some to be essential in developing the region these dams have drastically reduced flood cycles and disrupted wildlife feeding and breeding Likewise traditional farming and fishing patterns have been interrupted by the altered river flow The World Wide Fund for Nature WWF continues to lead efforts to connect transboundary stakeholders along the Zambezi to implement a basin wide master plan for environmental flow management Their work has blossomed into the

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/Africa/zambezi/pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Mekong River Basin
    country s staple food crops It is the source for 60 percent of the fish production in Vietnam providing food for 40 million people and contributing 27 percent of the country s gross domestic product GDP From 1993 to 2005 economic growth and electricity demand in the Mekong region increased at an average annual rate of about eight percent Power demand is expected to grow at six to seven percent annually to 2025 The total potential for hydropower is estimated at 53 000 MW of which only about five percent is currently installed Wildlife The ecoregions that make up the basin comprise an incredibly high diversity of habitats including deciduous dipterocarp forests moist evergreen forests karst limestone forests open grasslands and savannas upland plateaus wetlands and pristine riparian environments These globally unique landscapes are home to no fewer than 20 000 species of plants 1 200 bird species 800 species of reptiles and amphibians and 430 mammal species including Asian elephants and as many as 350 tigers one of the world s largest populations Moreover new species continue to be described Between 1997 and 2007 alone 1 059 new species were discovered in the Greater Mekong The overall biological significance and distinctiveness is reflected by the fact that World Wildlife Fund WWF has identified four of the basin areas as the world s most unique and important ecoregions Conservation Challenges The largest threat to the conservation values of the river system is from the series of dams and other hydropower projects planned for the river s mainstream and tributaries Such impacts on river ecosystems would have flow on effects to dependent communities and economies These impacts are expected to include a growing inequality in the lower Mekong Basin countries and an increase in poverty in the short and medium term especially among the poor in rural and urban riparian areas Food security is also likely to be affected by reductions in fisheries production and impacts on agricultural productivity due to inundation and changed water levels and likely changes to access rights for fishers and farmers There are also significant threats unrelated to hydropower development Sand mining to provide material for the construction industry Locally this has resulted in riverbank collapse and loss of property and at a basin scale a reduction in sediment to the delta and wetlands Over fishing Essentially most wetlands are open access resources This has since the 1990s lead to overexploitation of aquatic resources for commercial purposes Increased efficiency of fishing methods modern equipment and the growing number of motorized boats in recent years have intensified competition among fishers as reflected in overall decreased fish landings Pollution particularly from agriculture and residential runoff While water quality in the basin is generally good some areas particularly in Vietnam and Thailand suffer serious water pollution Climate change is expected to contribute to more extreme weather events like heavy rainfall prolonged droughts increased water needs due to high temperatures and severe storms Management Challenges Few places on Earth demonstrate

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/AsiaPacific/Mekong/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Niger River Basin
    consequences include changes in the hydrologic regime and destruction of natural habitats and the agricultural production and ecosystem services they provide for livelihoods and food security This is of particular importance in a region characterized by its extreme poverty and the fact that despite the massive exodus to urban areas over the past decades the bulk of West Africa s population still lives in the countryside and their main source of livelihoods and income depend heavily on agriculture mainly rain fed and from flood recession While there are ecological ramifications by storing fresh water during seasons and years of excess dams can be effective tools in combating uncertainties and shortages They also help produce electric power and reduce energy dependence on petroleum Wildlife West Africa s river systems harbor impressive aquatic biodiversity from a global to individual river basin scale The current system of protected areas of the Niger Basin includes numerous inland waters of high priority for the conservation of aquatic biodiversity from 24 Ramsar wetlands several of which are transboundary through to wetlands without formal protection but which are locally critical for the provision of a wide range of ecosystem services used by people Conservation Challenges To date the basin s system of inland waters is still poorly delineated inventoried and lacks effective planning or management Although there has been a strong focus on improving catchment land use management including for example important efforts to reverse the land degradation and river siltation trends associated with overgrazing and desertification there has been little effort to safeguard the freshwater natural capital services and interconnected functionality of the river system from its headwaters in Guinea through to the coastal Niger Delta Water resource management must take ecosystem requirements into account Management Challenges The water resources theme cuts across most of the

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/Africa/Niger/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Ogooué River Basin
    engage major agricultural companies particularly oil palm in a holistic site planning and mitigation effort Freshwater fisheries are also important to the local economy as they provide a critical form of protein and a more sustainable alternative to bushmeat The basin s primarily artisanal freshwater fisheries are currently poorly managed but the potential for fisheries co management arrangements is very high Wildlife The Ogooué Basin includes approximately 325 described fish species It has extremely high diversity of Cyprinodontiformes killifishes and Mormyridae snoutfish Approximately ¼ of the fish in the relevant ecoregions are endemic The Ogoou é Nyanga Kouilou Niari ecoregion has 249 fish species 69 endemic and the Southern Gulf of Guinea Drainages Bioko ecoregion has 293 species 75 of which are endemic Diversity is also high among herptofauna and aquatic mollusks notable among them are the African keeled mud turtle Pelusios carinatus and dwarf crocodile Osteolaemus tetraspsis Much of the basin has not been sampled for aquatic species and thus there is a high likelihood of undescribed species in the basin as well Conservation Challenges Considering Gabon s relatively high per capita income 8 600 high literacy rate 86 and the low population density in the Ogooué Basin less than 5 people per km2 there are still a number of conservation challenges in the basin One major challenge is the lack of formal management of freshwater resources despite Ramsar and National Park designations around key areas of freshwater biodiversity Although forestry laws have improved in the last decade there is inadequate capacity to enforce Gabon s goal of a sustainable forestry industry an issue that is of critical importance given approximately half of Ogooué Basin land is in concessions and illegal logging continues Oil development in Gabon occurs mainly outside of the Ogooué Basin but notable oil developments such as on Lake Ezanga could also threaten water quality in the lower river Commercial agriculture is expanding within the basin as well with oil palm development leading to habitat conversion which can create negative impacts if improperly sited Overall the primary resource and conservation challenge is to sustain the relative intactness of the forests and waterways of the Ogooué Basin and benefits created by these ecosystems for a third of Gabon s people that live in poverty in the face of rapid development in the agricultural energy and infrastructure sectors Management Challenges The primary river management challenges include excessive sediment loading of basin waterways from forestry operations and road construction leading to reduction in water quality and indirect impacts on aquatic fauna development of hydropower and achievement of national energy goals without jeopardizing the country s conservation goals lack of a freshwater conservation and management framework for the existing network freshwater conservation areas Ramsar site and National Parks to sustain freshwater biodiversity as well ecosystem services communities depend upon inadequate fisheries management particularly overharvesting through use of illegal gear and lack of limitation to entry jeopardizing the future availability of freshwater fish protein illegal hunting of aquatic dependent species of

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/Africa/Ogooue/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Colorado River Basin
    used in support of the broader western power grids Moreover the river system supports a 25 billion dollar recreational economy that includes white water rafting motor boating kayaking fly fishing birding camping hiking and visiting national parks The Grand Canyon is an international draw for tourists and rafters Wildlife Historically the Colorado River Basin was home to 42 native fish species including 30 endemic species found in no other river system Of these endemic species four are extinct twelve of are listed as endangered and four are listed threatened Despite this the whole river system continues to support important riparian plant communities and river dependent habitats for bats amphibians mollusks aquatic invertebrates and hundreds of species of migrating birds Conservation Challenges The greatest threats to the river include massive diversions of water from the river which have severely altered the river s flow patterns and resulting habitats non native species and water quality impacts Moreover many of the endemic species dependent on this river system are long lived and range over hundreds of river miles so that no single state agency or individual conservation organization can abate the threats to their survival Management Challenges The Colorado River Basin may epitomize the reclamation era of conquering the arid West and making the desert bloom We have transformed the Colorado River from a wildly unpredictable river into the most heavily regulated river system in the world a system that produces a steady flow of the water and electricity that powers the regional economy The reclamation era came with substantial costs however Legal allocations of the water supply were built on prior appropriation and overly optimistic projections of long term water availability This set up basic conflicts between cities and farms upstream and downstream water users states and nations and consumptive and non

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/NorthAmerica/Colorado/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Mississippi River Basin
    More than 400 native species of freshwater fish call the basin home The Mississippi also acts as a vital migration corridor for 60 percent of North America s bird species and provides critical habitat for freshwater mussels otters and other creatures including the rare Louisiana black bear Conservation Challenges The Mississippi River Basin has been highly altered over the last 200 years as a result of conversion of land from grassland and forest to agricultural production and urban areas protection of people and property from variable and sometimes devastating floods and construction of a commercial navigation system to transport agricultural and other bulk commodities to national and international markets Today the river has altered hydrology altered sediment and nutrient cycling regimes and altered flows and longitudinal connectivity and altered lateral connectivity within the river floodplain Over time many of these alterations have led to environmental degradation which has been the inspiration for management actions to mitigate the impacts Management Challenges The Nature Conservancy has been engaged throughout the basin for decades and the first phase of the GRP took TNC to new levels of involvement with agencies organizations policymakers and diverse stakeholders focused on the river its floodplain and several of the adjacent watersheds The major management challenges to safeguarding the ecological integrity of the Mississippi River Basin and the areas where the GRP will continue to focus efforts include Governance Uniting diverse stakeholders sectors and geographies behind a shared vision and building recognition for the basin using sound science and best practices to inform policy alternatives and measuring progress toward a healthier watershed that is economically socially and ecologically sustainable Sustainable Agriculture Increasing production with environmentally sustainable practices by working with producers informing developing and influencing policy and sustainable agricultural practices through demonstration projects that reduce sediment and nutrient

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/NorthAmerica/Mississippi/pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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  • Tapajós River Basin
    dams on the main rivers and 52 small and micro dams are being planned in the Tapajós River Basin without a basin wide strategic vision Through a recent agreement signed with the Brazilian Ministry of Environment and World Wildlife Fund The Nature Conservancy will have the opportunity to participate in the establishment of criteria to evaluate environmental performance of these dams and ultimately may be able to influence the dam planning process for the whole Amazon Wildlife The Tapajós Juruena ecoregion contains a diverse fauna of fishes with 324 valid species currently recognized 65 of which are endemic During the last 10 years alone 35 new endemic species have been described suggesting that the diversity is far higher than previously estimated and far from being completely catalogued This ecoregion ranks within the top 25 in terms of of global importance for both freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity rarity It is likely that a conservative estimate of the total number of fish species occupying the basin surpasses 500 The lower Tapajós River also harbors the Amazonian manatee Trichechus inunguis a vulnerable species endemic of the Amazon basin Main Tapajós Curua Una Basin environmental services include maintenance of biodiversity water cycling and carbon stocks soil protection ecosystem and habitat protection maintenance of biodiversity corridors The large forest areas along the Tapajós River corridor are considered as essential to the maintenance of climate functions and are extremely susceptible to climate change Loss of these forests is expected to lead to a severe savannization process in the region and reduction in the rainfall precipitation in the central west part of Brazil where key agricultural areas for grain cultivation are located provoking severe impacts on harvested yields Conservation Challenges The Tapajós Curua Una Basin still contains large areas of natural pristine terrestrial landscapes and undammed free

    Original URL path: http://www.greatriverspartnership.org/en-us/SouthAmerica/tapajos/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-15)
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