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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Gunsmithing
    2013 03 17 Gunsmithing with a 3D printer Part 4 Category 3D Printing Gunsmithing Tags no tag 22 comments 2013 03 03 Gunsmithing without a 3D printer 1 Category Gunsmithing Metalworking Tags no tag 6 comments 2012 08 26 Gunsmithing with a 3D printer Part 3 Category 3D Printing Gunsmithing Tags no tag 25 comments 2012 07 01 Gunsmithing with a 3D printer Part 2 Category 3D Printing Gunsmithing Tags

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?cat=24 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » 4-jaw chuck for the Keiyo Seiki
    the chuck body are attached from the spider side not from the front face of the chuck Thus using an adapter plate would be a mechanical impossibility with no way to reach the attaching screws So now I have a D 6 4 jaw that needs a new home and I needed to start from scratch Off to Enco Enco did in fact have the sort of 4 jaw chuck I was looking for I selected it based on the size of object it could pass anything smaller than the headstock ID would be wasteful so I purchased it during one of their free shipping promotions All I needed then was a backplate which I procured from Industry Recycles on Ebay I think it was actually an Enco offering but I managed to snag it for about half price Score Unlike the backplate for the 5C collet chuck this backplate mounted up just fine The trick then was mounting the chuck to the backplate rather than mounting the backplate to the lathe Mounting hardware was easily purchased from McMaster Carr and then it was time to start making holes in things Given my experience with the 5C collet chuck mounting I decided to be a little more precision oriented this time around I started by measuring the hole locations on the chuck itself Using calipers and screws inserted into the mounting holes I measured the distance across each pair of screws both inside and outside measurements I found that the locations of the four mounting bolt centerpoints differed by about 5 thousandths of an inch Instead of just basing my cuts on a single measurement I opted to use the average instead which came out to be a bolt circle of 5 10425 or a radius of 2 552 Easy

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1926 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Machining
    Aircraft Tags no tag 10 comments 2012 01 30 Stupid broaching tricks Category Machining Metalworking Tags no tag 4 comments 2011 02 22 From extrusion to injection molding Category Machining Metalworking Tags no tag 2 comments 2011 01 31 Rotary Phase Converter Part 2 Category Machining Metalworking Tags no tag Add Comment 2010 06 23 I m not dead yet Category Machining Metalworking Tags no tag 2 comments 2009 11

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?cat=14 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Metalworking
    without a 3D printer 2 Category Gunsmithing Tags no tag Add Comment 2014 05 05 Gunsmithing with a 3D Printer Part 5 Category 3D Printing Gunsmithing Tags no tag 3 comments 2013 04 12 Rotary Phase Converter Part 3 aka What temperature do electrons burn at Category Machining Metalworking Tags no tag Add Comment 2013 03 17 Gunsmithing with a 3D printer Part 4 Category 3D Printing Gunsmithing Tags no

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?cat=12 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » 5C Collet Chuck Mounting
    if anything It looked to be off of the bolt circle by only 0 002 which I d simply consider measurement error on my part I then determined the X Y coordinates for a lug recess centered between two of the mounting holes Back at the mill I shuttled the table to this location locked the ways on my old Tree locking really doesn t put a lot of clamping on the gibs but it helps keep things steady and proceeded to center drill the spot then drill down about 0 4 with a 1 2 drill The recess needed to be just a little over 3 4 but I didn t have a 3 4 drill so I used a 3 4 endmill to bore the depth Using an endmill to hog out most of the recess Finishing up with a boring head After bringing the recess to size with a boring head I removed it from the table cleaned it off and tried attaching it to the spindle The screws went in rather tight and it had difficultly squeezing flat against the spindle I guessed that my hole for the indicating lug was off by just a bit and I was squishing the lug Technically it fits but took more torque than should be needed After removing the plate I had a look at the lug recess and saw the telltale signs of metal interference Seeing linear marks here indicates that the lug was not centered in the recess and was binding on this edge I clamped the plate back onto the mill table and bumped the 3 4 endmill up against the marred edge of the recess I then zeroed the DRO retracted the quill moved over about 0 005 then milled down about 0 3 to relieve the area that was binding I put the plate back on the spindle and the screws tightened up a bit easier this time so I considered the rear of the plate to be complete The front of the plate has a raised boss that slips inside the rear edge of the chuck to keep it centered and this boss must be cut to size once the plate is mounted to the spindle This ensures that the boss is cut perfectly concentric with the lathe s spindle something impossible for the manufacturer of the plate to do as every spindle will run just a hair different Machining the boss on the front of the plate to final diameter I had to take the diameter of the boss down about 0 060 or so I used a carbide bit and took pretty light passes so I could sneak up on the final dimension without cutting any further than necessary Once I got close I d stop the lathe clean off the chips dust really the plate is cast iron which creates more of a coarse powder like fine sand rather than chips like you d get from aluminum or steel and

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=240 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » PIR foam for Stratasys build trays
    slurries and sprays to improve part adhesion on his very large scratchbuilt 3D printer I gave him a Stratasys foam base to try and it worked like a champ almost too well since the ABS support doesn t break away nearly as easily as HIPS support I mentioned my woes in trying to source more of the foam and he suggested trying the foil sided polyisocyanurate PIR foam that you can find at some home improvement stores and gave me a few pieces to try I cut a 12 square peeled the foil from one side and sprayed the other side with 3M 77 adhesive before pressing it onto my material testing plate I put the tray into the machine and let it heat up before testing it Unfortunately I failed to take differential thermal expansion into consideration With the chamber heated to 70 C the foam expanded ever so slightly buckling upwards due to the foil still being attached on the underside I removed the foil from the underside and lacking anything better used a bunch of paperclips around the perimeter to secure the foam While the PIR foam surface isn t as smooth as the Stratasys bases it s good enough for my needs and a test print went fine The part and support removed from the PIR foam very easily with just a little tearing of the substrate Overall it s still not quite as good as the FR 7104 foam tears more easily and doesn t grip as well but for a cheap readily available material it s the best thing I ve found so far The only drawback is that locally available sheets are only 1 thick and I need 1 25 of thickness but shimming up the base from the bottom shouldn t be much of an issue 4 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply Atil said 2015 03 18 18 41 Hello Haveblue I coudnt find your Email adresse so Im writing in your comment section I did get a FDM 3000 modell but cant get it too run Hopefully you can help me out 1 After getting some NV Memory errors i did try to load the paramter file i got with the mashine but after that it doesnt even go to home anymore Do you have a paramter file for me 2 The second problem is that i cant get the Extduer to work When i push the load button the motors and gears dont move as if there is no power But the Head gets warm and both of the hotends heat up I cant get the filament to move into the head I would really appreciate your help Thank you very much in advance for everything Reply Ed Langenderfer said 2015 06 30 22 29 Hi HaveBlue I also have an FDM 1600 I ve built many parts on it however it has stopped all head movement Would you be able to help or advise me Would you

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1913 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » More build surfaces that don’t work
    a road width for the limited die swell of the MG47 I recreated the base on the part as the big 3 8 thickness was definitely overkill and it extended much further outward than needed With a reduced crosshatch road width of 0 0132 I tried the part again The carpet like top of the base layer reminded me that I had neglected to adjust the road width for the other layer types as well but as the crosshatch infill was looking great I let the build run until completion I also dropped the nozzle temperature down to only 240 C as the feed torque wasn t very high and lower temperatures would droop less At the end I had prototype paintball hopper halves and a pump for my Phantom paintball gun As noted I had drooping filaments due to not having adjusted all of the road widths I expected a bit of drooping on the overhangs as I wasn t using any supports Rather than having to cut and sand the parts off of the base they were able to be peeled away without too much fuss The crosshatch infill came out great with no drooping all the way through the part I had intended to just tear out this infill leaving the hollow shell but the filament is a lot tougher than I had expected The base did lift from the foam base on one side unfortunately which let the hopper halves warp a bit With this build complete I went back to QuickSlice to adjust the road widths for the other layers and tried running a small test part that used aligned roads as the top of the base While the dome on the part didn t come out perfect I didn t have the same sagging as before The stubs on each side were John Branlund s idea as a way to check for backlash Fortunately I had no discernible backlash in the system The part separated quite nicely from the base only minimal sanding would be needed to remove the traces of support from the bottom of the part I ran 2 more parts at increasingly higher temperatures left was 240 C center was 255 C right was 270 C to see what the results would be Sagging on the top aligned roads of the base increased as the temperature went up Separating the part from the base also became more difficult with the increase in temperature as the layer bonding became stronger Fortunately more OEM support material has now arrived so I can finally be back to proper operation shortly 18 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply John Branlund said 2011 03 26 22 41 Great No backlash is possible with a cable system Have to tighten mine up as soon as I can John Reply Deckmaster said 2011 03 27 08 27 Odd thought for materials to try as a base to release from Need the hard platform but paint the surface

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=974 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » FCG pocketing with CNC
    for the rest of the pocket Yes I tend to make Z steps very shallow but hogging out material with a 3 8 endmill with a fairly long length of cut is quite a bit for the Taig to handle so I try to keep all the cutting lightweight even if it means really long cycle times This was my first attempt to use HSMExpress and I had no idea how well the toolpaths would work or if the mill would suddenly take off on its own and carve a giant trough through the piece turning a 70 part into 62 cents of scrap metal If only I had some sort of cheap plastic version for proving out the setup Quick to the 3D printer I took a standard AR lower CAD model and filled in the FCG area to simulate an 80 lower I made sure to print the part with sparse infill to save plastic and time but I still needed a way to have a solid FCG area to provide material for the mill to actually cut I cut an opening over the FCG area and mixed up a batch of West System epoxy I wish every hardware stored carried bulk epoxy supplies luckily I live near one loaded with a whole bunch of talcum powder I could have used some other filler but I went with talc specifically to give minimal wear on the cutting tool many common epoxy fillers can be quite abrasive to say nothing of the fiberglass carbon fiber etc that generally constitutes the matrix of a composite material layup I poured the epoxy talc mix into the FCG area and let it sit overnight to cure In retrospect I should have tried doing a vapor treatment on the part first as the epoxy seeped out the sides a bit but it wasn t enough to affect the part s purpose After reaming out the takedown pins I was able to mount the printed 80 lower in the jig bolted to the Taig s table I ran my generated program and it worked great Right up until the very end when the mill plunged right through the rear of the bolt catch area Precisely the sort of thing I wanted to test for so it was all worthwhile I made a few adjustments to the G code and ran the program through again to make sure that nothing else looked awry After that I switched out the printed plastic lower for my partially completed 0 lower This showed me some other issues I hadn t anticipated specifically that the endmill liked to bog down in the aluminum I hit STOP right away turned off the spindle power and took a step back to ponder The 4 flute endmill was probably not the optimal tool for this pocketing operation but I had gone with it to increase rigidity due to the long tool length required The default toolpaths were also using climb cutting rather

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1887 (2016-04-26)
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