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  • Have Blue [dot org] » More build surfaces that don’t work
    road width for the limited die swell of the MG47 I recreated the base on the part as the big 3 8 thickness was definitely overkill and it extended much further outward than needed With a reduced crosshatch road width of 0 0132 I tried the part again The carpet like top of the base layer reminded me that I had neglected to adjust the road width for the other layer types as well but as the crosshatch infill was looking great I let the build run until completion I also dropped the nozzle temperature down to only 240 C as the feed torque wasn t very high and lower temperatures would droop less At the end I had prototype paintball hopper halves and a pump for my Phantom paintball gun As noted I had drooping filaments due to not having adjusted all of the road widths I expected a bit of drooping on the overhangs as I wasn t using any supports Rather than having to cut and sand the parts off of the base they were able to be peeled away without too much fuss The crosshatch infill came out great with no drooping all the way through the part I had intended to just tear out this infill leaving the hollow shell but the filament is a lot tougher than I had expected The base did lift from the foam base on one side unfortunately which let the hopper halves warp a bit With this build complete I went back to QuickSlice to adjust the road widths for the other layers and tried running a small test part that used aligned roads as the top of the base While the dome on the part didn t come out perfect I didn t have the same sagging as before The stubs on each side were John Branlund s idea as a way to check for backlash Fortunately I had no discernible backlash in the system The part separated quite nicely from the base only minimal sanding would be needed to remove the traces of support from the bottom of the part I ran 2 more parts at increasingly higher temperatures left was 240 C center was 255 C right was 270 C to see what the results would be Sagging on the top aligned roads of the base increased as the temperature went up Separating the part from the base also became more difficult with the increase in temperature as the layer bonding became stronger Fortunately more OEM support material has now arrived so I can finally be back to proper operation shortly 18 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply John Branlund said 2011 03 26 22 41 Great No backlash is possible with a cable system Have to tighten mine up as soon as I can John Reply Deckmaster said 2011 03 27 08 27 Odd thought for materials to try as a base to release from Need the hard platform but paint the surface of

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=974&replytocom=585919 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » More build surfaces that don’t work
    road width for the limited die swell of the MG47 I recreated the base on the part as the big 3 8 thickness was definitely overkill and it extended much further outward than needed With a reduced crosshatch road width of 0 0132 I tried the part again The carpet like top of the base layer reminded me that I had neglected to adjust the road width for the other layer types as well but as the crosshatch infill was looking great I let the build run until completion I also dropped the nozzle temperature down to only 240 C as the feed torque wasn t very high and lower temperatures would droop less At the end I had prototype paintball hopper halves and a pump for my Phantom paintball gun As noted I had drooping filaments due to not having adjusted all of the road widths I expected a bit of drooping on the overhangs as I wasn t using any supports Rather than having to cut and sand the parts off of the base they were able to be peeled away without too much fuss The crosshatch infill came out great with no drooping all the way through the part I had intended to just tear out this infill leaving the hollow shell but the filament is a lot tougher than I had expected The base did lift from the foam base on one side unfortunately which let the hopper halves warp a bit With this build complete I went back to QuickSlice to adjust the road widths for the other layers and tried running a small test part that used aligned roads as the top of the base While the dome on the part didn t come out perfect I didn t have the same sagging as before The stubs on each side were John Branlund s idea as a way to check for backlash Fortunately I had no discernible backlash in the system The part separated quite nicely from the base only minimal sanding would be needed to remove the traces of support from the bottom of the part I ran 2 more parts at increasingly higher temperatures left was 240 C center was 255 C right was 270 C to see what the results would be Sagging on the top aligned roads of the base increased as the temperature went up Separating the part from the base also became more difficult with the increase in temperature as the layer bonding became stronger Fortunately more OEM support material has now arrived so I can finally be back to proper operation shortly 18 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply John Branlund said 2011 03 26 22 41 Great No backlash is possible with a cable system Have to tighten mine up as soon as I can John Reply Deckmaster said 2011 03 27 08 27 Odd thought for materials to try as a base to release from Need the hard platform but paint the surface of

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=974&replytocom=50354 (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Have Blue [dot org] » More build surfaces that don’t work
    road width for the limited die swell of the MG47 I recreated the base on the part as the big 3 8 thickness was definitely overkill and it extended much further outward than needed With a reduced crosshatch road width of 0 0132 I tried the part again The carpet like top of the base layer reminded me that I had neglected to adjust the road width for the other layer types as well but as the crosshatch infill was looking great I let the build run until completion I also dropped the nozzle temperature down to only 240 C as the feed torque wasn t very high and lower temperatures would droop less At the end I had prototype paintball hopper halves and a pump for my Phantom paintball gun As noted I had drooping filaments due to not having adjusted all of the road widths I expected a bit of drooping on the overhangs as I wasn t using any supports Rather than having to cut and sand the parts off of the base they were able to be peeled away without too much fuss The crosshatch infill came out great with no drooping all the way through the part I had intended to just tear out this infill leaving the hollow shell but the filament is a lot tougher than I had expected The base did lift from the foam base on one side unfortunately which let the hopper halves warp a bit With this build complete I went back to QuickSlice to adjust the road widths for the other layers and tried running a small test part that used aligned roads as the top of the base While the dome on the part didn t come out perfect I didn t have the same sagging as before The stubs on each side were John Branlund s idea as a way to check for backlash Fortunately I had no discernible backlash in the system The part separated quite nicely from the base only minimal sanding would be needed to remove the traces of support from the bottom of the part I ran 2 more parts at increasingly higher temperatures left was 240 C center was 255 C right was 270 C to see what the results would be Sagging on the top aligned roads of the base increased as the temperature went up Separating the part from the base also became more difficult with the increase in temperature as the layer bonding became stronger Fortunately more OEM support material has now arrived so I can finally be back to proper operation shortly 18 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply John Branlund said 2011 03 26 22 41 Great No backlash is possible with a cable system Have to tighten mine up as soon as I can John Reply Deckmaster said 2011 03 27 08 27 Odd thought for materials to try as a base to release from Need the hard platform but paint the surface of

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=974&replytocom=50357 (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Have Blue [dot org] » More build surfaces that don’t work
    limited die swell of the MG47 I recreated the base on the part as the big 3 8 thickness was definitely overkill and it extended much further outward than needed With a reduced crosshatch road width of 0 0132 I tried the part again The carpet like top of the base layer reminded me that I had neglected to adjust the road width for the other layer types as well but as the crosshatch infill was looking great I let the build run until completion I also dropped the nozzle temperature down to only 240 C as the feed torque wasn t very high and lower temperatures would droop less At the end I had prototype paintball hopper halves and a pump for my Phantom paintball gun As noted I had drooping filaments due to not having adjusted all of the road widths I expected a bit of drooping on the overhangs as I wasn t using any supports Rather than having to cut and sand the parts off of the base they were able to be peeled away without too much fuss The crosshatch infill came out great with no drooping all the way through the part I had intended to just tear out this infill leaving the hollow shell but the filament is a lot tougher than I had expected The base did lift from the foam base on one side unfortunately which let the hopper halves warp a bit With this build complete I went back to QuickSlice to adjust the road widths for the other layers and tried running a small test part that used aligned roads as the top of the base While the dome on the part didn t come out perfect I didn t have the same sagging as before The stubs on each side were John Branlund s idea as a way to check for backlash Fortunately I had no discernible backlash in the system The part separated quite nicely from the base only minimal sanding would be needed to remove the traces of support from the bottom of the part I ran 2 more parts at increasingly higher temperatures left was 240 C center was 255 C right was 270 C to see what the results would be Sagging on the top aligned roads of the base increased as the temperature went up Separating the part from the base also became more difficult with the increase in temperature as the layer bonding became stronger Fortunately more OEM support material has now arrived so I can finally be back to proper operation shortly 18 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply John Branlund said 2011 03 26 22 41 Great No backlash is possible with a cable system Have to tighten mine up as soon as I can John Reply Deckmaster said 2011 03 27 08 27 Odd thought for materials to try as a base to release from Need the hard platform but paint the surface of it with latex house

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=974&replytocom=1156430 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Reverse engineering for molds
    the wing in front of the scanner itself The base will automatically rotate in increments if needed but I just needed a 1 pass scan Once in place let the scanner rip a few of the laser beams are visible sweeping over the scan area and the monitor screen shows a rough pass of the scanned pod I brought the generated STL into MeshLab and did some minor cleanup before bringing it into SolidWorks SolidWorks actually has some impressive mesh to surface capabilities but since I was working with a mesh with a few holes in it it would have taken a bit of work to get usable output and I didn t see a way to define a symmetry plane but maybe I didn t look hard enough Instead I did my own surfacing which took me quite a while I m not good at it and I know some of my techniques are wrong but the final output should serve its intended function After finishing the male side of the mold I thickened the surface by 0 010 I figure that should be plenty of fiberglass to create a solid and extracted the far surface as the female side of the mold I set the two halves side by side in an assembly and exported it to GibbsCAM Once in Gibbs I created my toolpaths this shows the paths for the second operation which uses a 0 250 ball end mill After posting the file I was finally ready to start cutting material Not having yet found any 1 thick scrap Corian everything I ve gotten is 1 2 I glued two pieces together The cold temperatures meant that the epoxy hadn t fully cured after 24 hours so I stuck it in front of a space heater for a day and that firmed everything right up I drilled and counterbored mounting holes and then bolted the block to the tooling plate on the Taig This shows the results of the first pass which was roughed with a 0 250 flat end mill Note the curvature in the parting plane to match the airfoil surface This is the third and final pass which used a 0 125 ball end mill and a generous amount of WD 40 as cutting fluid Once washed off this is the result The pattern of the Corian makes it impossible to see any fine detail in the photo but the surface finish is phenomenal I used a 0 010 stepover for the final pass overkill but it s my CNC so I m not paying any extra for machine time and it looks superb when you hold the machined surfaces up to the light All that remains now is to chop the two halves apart then sand and polish the mold surfaces 2 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply Charles said 2012 02 23 21 07 This looks pretty sweet One question how did you know that the epoxy hadn t set

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1183 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » I made a Thingi
    find just such a thing Of course the obvious solution is to make something myself A simple tray with appropriately sized holes would be functional enough but I wanted something with just a little more elegance While some of my most treasured tools have wooden cases I have no problems with a good plastic case and have on at least one occasion purchased a really crummy tool for no other purpose than for the halfway decent plastic case that it comes in So I whipped up a box in SolidWorks that could contain 15 ER16 collets with a matching lid I added some bumps around the outside edge between the halves to key them together so the lid would stay in place and then sent it off to the printer The result was the box mentioned in this post from a few months ago It wasn t a great quality print as mentioned in the post and I had incorrectly estimated the sizing of the cutouts for the collets which left them sticking up too far to let the lid close fully I gave it another try with a fixed model in Insight with the black Bolson ABS material and things fared much better The interface between the support and model material wasn t great but I quickly discovered part of the problem The lid upper right has a darker triangular patch on the bottom left corner This is because no material was deposited there on the first model layer there was so much ooze from the model material that a good deal of it flowed out during the lengthy build of the support layers As the machine was trying to print the perimeters of the first layer and the start of the infill on the lid no material was coming out since the liquifier wasn t full Thankfully this can actually be accounted for in Insight as you can instruct the printer to purge material for longer than normal in order to top off the liquifier I ll need to remember to do this on builds with lots of base layer surface area No matter collets fit this version just fine and I m not terribly concerned about aesthetics on something that s going to get knocked around in the garage My original plan was to build hinges into the model I wanted to have lugs coming off the back of the base and lid with circular recesses into which small disc magnets would be glued The magnets would attract each other and act as a hinge axis while hopefully providing enough friction to keep the lid open even when at an angle I d still like to explore that concept in the future but to finish this project in a hurry I simply used a pair of small hinges from Lowe s I now have all my collets in one place next to the Taig in easy reach and was pleased enough with how it turned out that

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1072 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Quick CNC work
    purchased a motor and ESC Since the new 400 brushless was mounted at the base rather than the face I couldn t use the included light plywood motor mount I needed to build my own custom motor mount and I happened to have some 3 x3 squares of 1 16 G 10 fiberglass sheet left over from a project that would make for very sturdy construction I drew up the needed parts in Cadkey and then tinkered with GibbsCAM at work to hopefully output usable toolpaths Fortunately I ve gotten much better in this regard and the G code worked out just fine I used a hunk of scrap polycarbonate bolted to the tooling plate on my Taig as a sacrificial base Frankie recommended using carpet tape to hold sheet stock flat for machining and it worked like a charm I m using a 1 32 carbide cutter to do the milling I think it cut through the sheet in 3 or 4 passes When done the parts were easily pulled off of the base After removing the tape and adhesive with a Goo Gone type of solvent here s the parts I had As it turned out I could have skeletonized them far more than I did and using 1 32 G 10 may have been an even better material I did have to do a bit of filing by hand to make things fit the original plywood parts were laser cut and so had perfect square cornered slots which obviously can t be done with a round endmill Glued together it looks pretty good Fits beautifully on the plane and certainly looks like the beefiest part of the entire airframe Unfortunately she would never look this good again On the final flight just after I had moved up

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1055 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » CNC router build – now with wheels
    holes of the adjoining extrusion A piece of angle extrusion on the inside corner of each leg then clamps the two pieces together once the screws have been adjusted to level out the table I haven t gotten the leveling to be perfect but it is most definitely good enough especially for the expected accuracy of such a machine Finally I completed the two carriages for the main axis Fine Line Automation and CNC Router Parts carry these for 33 50 each which I thought to be a bit high After machining a pair of them myself I ve rethought that assessment and now they seem like a pretty good deal I used bearings from VXB for the rollers and everything went together quite nicely though I did have to machine down the heads on the machine screws for clearance I ll have to readjust the torque on the fasteners though the nylon washers I used between the bearings and the blocks crush and deform enough to let the washer wear against the red seal on the bearings causing drag With a bit of red Loc Tite to keep things in place I should be able to back off the pressure to allow the carriages to slide more freely As much of a pain as they were I ll still machine the remaining 4 carriages myself seeing as how I have the bar stock already rough sawed and all the bearings purchased But before that I ll start work on the main leadscrew and associated hardware so that I can have an axis of motion to be proud of PS James Jones directed me to an intriguing project he s heading called CubeSpawn It s a flexible manufacturing system based on T slot extrusion once I realized that it s

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=853 (2016-04-26)
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