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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Retro drilling
    drill but the Cole has the advantages of rigidity extreme feed pressure no electricity needed and won t tear your arm off if the bit catches As mentioned the Cole Drill was still being manufactured up until maybe 2005 or so by Cole Tool Mfg Despite being old tech they still commanded a rather hefty retail price presumably limited demand led to the product being discontinued While the drills have been routinely available used on Ebay since that time it seems that prices have been going up I seem to recall the going price to be around 60 or so a few years back but now it seems that getting one for under 100 is a bargain Admittedly I have zero use for a Cole Drill However given the field expediency of such a tool drilling holes in a truck frame miles away from a power source being a good example it s a tool that I d really like to be able to put my hands on in a hurry should the need ever arise I finally found one on Ebay that wasn t horribly expensive owing to a fairly rusty look to it However the seller said that the drill had been purchased new had been barely used and had been sitting in an Arizona workshop for the past 30 years or so There was a pretty good chance of it cleaning up very nicely so I bought it When it arrived I eagerly opened up the box to have a look Stout would be the adjective at the top of the list when attempting to describe the unit It was a little larger than expected and most certainly heavier I hosed it down with Gibbs spray another product touted by Guy Lautard and set it aside to soak in and and help remove some of the rust After wiping it off things looked a bit cleaner and I took it along to metalworking class so that Frankie could make patterns from it and hopefully bang out a few castings Once I had the drill back in my hands I printed out a few pieces of information from the web and gave them and the drill to my dad as a long planned present Dad is one of the few people I know who has the mechanical ingenuity to use such a tool to its full potential and will probably have far more opportunities to put it to good use than I ever will But at least I now know where I can borrow one in a hurry if I ever need it 6 comments so far Add Your Comment Reply Katie said 2011 08 04 12 58 Roy Underhill is also the patron saint of Lost Fingers Gashed Limbs Puncture Wounds Outbursts Reply Have Blue said 2011 08 04 15 45 Actually that brings up an interesting point damaged or missing digits is a not uncommon affliction of professional woodworkers yet I don t know that I

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=369 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » The Zcorp lives!
    an email I remember chatting previously on the makergear IRC channel I have an idea for a 3D printing event here in Milwaukee and wanted to communicate about the possibilities Reply Have Blue said 2012 02 16 08 48 Hi Chris I have your email address via your comment so I ll drop you a line shortly Reply patch said 2012 05 15 18 34 wow Great find I know a guy who whould kill for the waxer or the powderer station I spend most my time fixing 400 and 402 s so if you ever need any help just ask Reply Have Blue said 2012 06 01 09 51 Thanks I ll let Frankie know your email address in case he ever needs a hand with repairs Reply paul hancock said 2012 08 12 13 27 Hi I wonder if you could help me There is a none working Z406 for sale that says The not so good bits The problems I have seen are 1 intermittent errors with the print heads which may be solved by simply replacing them they are standard HP cartridges 2 an issue with the binder flow pressure which results in no flow and will require bleeding the line Other than the above everything else including power now appears to be working correctly Do you think this is an easy fix I m quite handy with tech stuff but my main concern is if I need any spares I m sure that they would be expensive or hard to get Thanks Paul Reply Have Blue said 2012 08 13 08 10 Hi Paul The print heads do have a limited lifespan and users will generally hack Canon cartridges with fittings to convert them for use The binder flow pressure sounds like there could be a clog in the line somewhere and doing a full system flush might be a good idea I d try contacting Chris Meyer at Sector67 http www sector67 org He knows a great deal about the Zcorp machines and may be able to give some insight Reply paul hancock said 2012 08 13 12 43 cheers thanks for that I enquired on a UK website for consumables next day I got a call from them They rubbished the 406 saying it was old and not upto the quality of a 650 then tried to sell me a new one DO I LOOK LIKE I M MADE OF MONEY Reply Have Blue said 2012 08 15 09 35 I m not surprised whenever I mention to a Stratasys dealer that I have an old FDM they immediately tell me that I should trade it in for the late t model I ll keep using my old non crippled machine thank you very much Reply Martin B said 2012 06 06 23 18 Add me to the list of people with a zcorp machine I just picked up a z406 which is basically the same machine w three color CMY printing I

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1149&cpage=1&replytocom=16779 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » The Zcorp lives!
    an email I remember chatting previously on the makergear IRC channel I have an idea for a 3D printing event here in Milwaukee and wanted to communicate about the possibilities Reply Have Blue said 2012 02 16 08 48 Hi Chris I have your email address via your comment so I ll drop you a line shortly Reply patch said 2012 05 15 18 34 wow Great find I know a guy who whould kill for the waxer or the powderer station I spend most my time fixing 400 and 402 s so if you ever need any help just ask Reply Have Blue said 2012 06 01 09 51 Thanks I ll let Frankie know your email address in case he ever needs a hand with repairs Reply paul hancock said 2012 08 12 13 27 Hi I wonder if you could help me There is a none working Z406 for sale that says The not so good bits The problems I have seen are 1 intermittent errors with the print heads which may be solved by simply replacing them they are standard HP cartridges 2 an issue with the binder flow pressure which results in no flow and will require bleeding the line Other than the above everything else including power now appears to be working correctly Do you think this is an easy fix I m quite handy with tech stuff but my main concern is if I need any spares I m sure that they would be expensive or hard to get Thanks Paul Reply Have Blue said 2012 08 13 08 10 Hi Paul The print heads do have a limited lifespan and users will generally hack Canon cartridges with fittings to convert them for use The binder flow pressure sounds like there could be a clog in the line somewhere and doing a full system flush might be a good idea I d try contacting Chris Meyer at Sector67 http www sector67 org He knows a great deal about the Zcorp machines and may be able to give some insight Reply paul hancock said 2012 08 13 12 43 cheers thanks for that I enquired on a UK website for consumables next day I got a call from them They rubbished the 406 saying it was old and not upto the quality of a 650 then tried to sell me a new one DO I LOOK LIKE I M MADE OF MONEY Reply Have Blue said 2012 08 15 09 35 I m not surprised whenever I mention to a Stratasys dealer that I have an old FDM they immediately tell me that I should trade it in for the late t model I ll keep using my old non crippled machine thank you very much Reply Martin B said 2012 06 06 23 18 Add me to the list of people with a zcorp machine I just picked up a z406 which is basically the same machine w three color CMY printing I

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1149&cpage=1&replytocom=16798 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Gunsmithing with a 3D Printer – Part 5
    Liberator to which itself we clamped to a folding table In front of the test rig we set up the sensors for my PACT chronograph used to measure the speed of the fired bullet For safety we used a 30 foot length of paracord to pull the trigger Note also that we used machine screws to actually mount the breech block within the receiver rather than 3D printed pins Additionally Joe s barrel was slightly longer than the published Liberator barrel We had a great deal of difficulty getting the gun to fire in the first place making nearly ten attempts to get it to go bang The first issue was getting the sear tail to actually release the hammer so we replaced the trigger bar with one printed on my machine After this the primer was indeed getting struck but it did not seem to be igniting we replaced the springs with ones from my machine as well We would wait 30 seconds after each attempt in case there was a hangfire thankfully we never had one during the testing We wondered if headspacing could be an issue so we pulled Joe s barrel and put in one that I had printed on my machine We also replaced the 380 cartridge we had been using with a fresh one in case it was a dud Our next attempt did indeed go bang and there was very little of the barrel left in the receiver My Stratasys FDM 1600 still has a bit of porosity in its output and I hadn t done a solvent vapor treatment on the barrel as was recommended by Defense Distributed Also the round was a very tight fit and had to be pressed into the barrel it s possible that the bullet became dislodged seating further down within the case and causing higher pressures when fired While the barrel was destroyed we finally achieved primer ignition so we put Joe s barrel back in and continued testing With things finally working if not smoothly we proceeded to fire off as many shots as we could manage during the available sunlight Here s a short video of the successful shots made Lulz Liberator testing video The video hints at some of the issues we ran into during testing We didn t have the retainer for the firing pin installed so the firing pin would rocket out the back during every shot We used a piece of masking tape on one attempt you can see it fly up after the shot to try and keep the firing pin in place but the hole punched through the tape shows that this did not work at all We only had one roofing nail but fortunately Joe happened to have along extra machine screws that he used for assembly and was able to fashion a replacement firing pin each time by cutting and filing it with a pocket multitool We had to make the firing pin longer each time as well since each subsequent shot increased the headspace with the cartridge becoming seated further and further down the barrel each time The 3 screws holding the breech block in place also became noticeably bent as testing continued so we replaced them halfway through Here s what the Lulzbot printed barrel looked like after its first successful firing The cartridge has actually been pushed back a bit hence pushing back on the breech block and bending the retaining screws as noted You can also see white spots forming known as crazing as a result of the internal stress Finally the primer has been pierced allowing gas to erupt out the back of the cartridge which is an undesirable behavior However this is not a fault of the Liberator s design but a side effect of using a roofing nail or field expedient machine screw the sharp nose of the nail or screw actually punctures the primer cup whereas proper firearm firing pins actually have a carefully rounded nose so that they dent but do not pierce the primer In fairness however pierced primers are not a great concern on a disposable firearm such as the Liberator or its WWII ancestor Continually piercing primers will allow the hot gases to erode the bolt face firing pin hole firing pin tip etc in a conventional firearm but for a disposable gun designed to operate only a few times this is admittedly a minor design quibble One thing the photo does not really indicate is how firmly the brass case is actually stuck inside the barrel In a conventional metal barrel the brass does expand somewhat during firing which is actually beneficial in sealing the case to the chamber walls in a process known as obturation The brass relaxes slightly as the bullet exits the barrel which allows the internal pressure to drop back down to atmospheric levels but since ABS plastic is much lower in strength than steel the brass case expands greatly in the Liberator making conventional extraction all but impossible In our case we needed to use a hex wrench and a rock to beat the expended cartridge out of the barrel Unsurprisingly the walls had expanded so far that the case had actually split More surprising to us though was the fact that the barrel bore looked entirely unscathed not only by the projectile but by the hot propellant gases The photo really doesn t show it but in looking down the bore the finish appeared just the same as in the unfired state Both Joe and I presume that there is so much bore expansion during firing that the bullet itself isn t even touching the rifling Granted the rifling would have done almost nothing anyhow a copper jacket is still much harder than ABS plastic We only managed to record two shots with the chronograph we weren t using skyscreens and they probably would have helped The captured velocities were 498 2 and 465 1 fps for

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1631&replytocom=644231 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Gunsmithing with a 3D Printer – Part 5
    Liberator to which itself we clamped to a folding table In front of the test rig we set up the sensors for my PACT chronograph used to measure the speed of the fired bullet For safety we used a 30 foot length of paracord to pull the trigger Note also that we used machine screws to actually mount the breech block within the receiver rather than 3D printed pins Additionally Joe s barrel was slightly longer than the published Liberator barrel We had a great deal of difficulty getting the gun to fire in the first place making nearly ten attempts to get it to go bang The first issue was getting the sear tail to actually release the hammer so we replaced the trigger bar with one printed on my machine After this the primer was indeed getting struck but it did not seem to be igniting we replaced the springs with ones from my machine as well We would wait 30 seconds after each attempt in case there was a hangfire thankfully we never had one during the testing We wondered if headspacing could be an issue so we pulled Joe s barrel and put in one that I had printed on my machine We also replaced the 380 cartridge we had been using with a fresh one in case it was a dud Our next attempt did indeed go bang and there was very little of the barrel left in the receiver My Stratasys FDM 1600 still has a bit of porosity in its output and I hadn t done a solvent vapor treatment on the barrel as was recommended by Defense Distributed Also the round was a very tight fit and had to be pressed into the barrel it s possible that the bullet became dislodged seating further down within the case and causing higher pressures when fired While the barrel was destroyed we finally achieved primer ignition so we put Joe s barrel back in and continued testing With things finally working if not smoothly we proceeded to fire off as many shots as we could manage during the available sunlight Here s a short video of the successful shots made Lulz Liberator testing video The video hints at some of the issues we ran into during testing We didn t have the retainer for the firing pin installed so the firing pin would rocket out the back during every shot We used a piece of masking tape on one attempt you can see it fly up after the shot to try and keep the firing pin in place but the hole punched through the tape shows that this did not work at all We only had one roofing nail but fortunately Joe happened to have along extra machine screws that he used for assembly and was able to fashion a replacement firing pin each time by cutting and filing it with a pocket multitool We had to make the firing pin longer each time as well since each subsequent shot increased the headspace with the cartridge becoming seated further and further down the barrel each time The 3 screws holding the breech block in place also became noticeably bent as testing continued so we replaced them halfway through Here s what the Lulzbot printed barrel looked like after its first successful firing The cartridge has actually been pushed back a bit hence pushing back on the breech block and bending the retaining screws as noted You can also see white spots forming known as crazing as a result of the internal stress Finally the primer has been pierced allowing gas to erupt out the back of the cartridge which is an undesirable behavior However this is not a fault of the Liberator s design but a side effect of using a roofing nail or field expedient machine screw the sharp nose of the nail or screw actually punctures the primer cup whereas proper firearm firing pins actually have a carefully rounded nose so that they dent but do not pierce the primer In fairness however pierced primers are not a great concern on a disposable firearm such as the Liberator or its WWII ancestor Continually piercing primers will allow the hot gases to erode the bolt face firing pin hole firing pin tip etc in a conventional firearm but for a disposable gun designed to operate only a few times this is admittedly a minor design quibble One thing the photo does not really indicate is how firmly the brass case is actually stuck inside the barrel In a conventional metal barrel the brass does expand somewhat during firing which is actually beneficial in sealing the case to the chamber walls in a process known as obturation The brass relaxes slightly as the bullet exits the barrel which allows the internal pressure to drop back down to atmospheric levels but since ABS plastic is much lower in strength than steel the brass case expands greatly in the Liberator making conventional extraction all but impossible In our case we needed to use a hex wrench and a rock to beat the expended cartridge out of the barrel Unsurprisingly the walls had expanded so far that the case had actually split More surprising to us though was the fact that the barrel bore looked entirely unscathed not only by the projectile but by the hot propellant gases The photo really doesn t show it but in looking down the bore the finish appeared just the same as in the unfired state Both Joe and I presume that there is so much bore expansion during firing that the bullet itself isn t even touching the rifling Granted the rifling would have done almost nothing anyhow a copper jacket is still much harder than ABS plastic We only managed to record two shots with the chronograph we weren t using skyscreens and they probably would have helped The captured velocities were 498 2 and 465 1 fps for

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1631&replytocom=645316 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Well, there’s your problem…
    CMM in doing the reverse engineering and his custom made nozzles work perfectly so who am I to argue with success I also noticed that on my 2000 s support nozzle the central 0 154 protrusion on the back side of the nozzle actually sticks out by a few thou whereas Craig noted his is dead flat with the outside ring surface There may have been some loose tolerances at work during manufacturing especially in light of what I found on the extruder tube When using some short lengths of wire old solid core phone wire worked well as a pseudo pipe cleaner to push pull out softened polymer goop from the hole that runs through the center of the extruder tube I noticed something rather odd the wire would tend to catch when I pushed it through from the nozzle end It was almost as if there were a constriction in the extruder tube After digging out the last bits of Torlon from the inlet side it still looked like there was some buildup on that end of the extruder After trying to clean it up further with a pick and looking at it through a lighted magnifying lens it became quite clear to me that it wasn t buildup at all but aluminum the extruder tube was poorly made in the first place Here s an image showing exactly how this extruder tube would appear if you sliced it in half The extruder tube appears to have been turned on a lathe before having the 90 degree bend done with the central hole having been drilled through from each end 1 16 drill from the nozzle end and 5 64 from the inlet end as best as I can determine Apparently one of the holes was drilled just a few hundredths of an inch too shallow leaving a nice conic restriction just past the inlet No wonder the blasted contraption had been jamming like crazy Pushing a 05 ish diameter wire though the fully functional model extruder showed that there was no such restriction I can t think of a single reason why you could conceivably want such a restriction in the first place so I can only assume that this was extremely poor quality control on the part of Stratasys apparently the horror stories of people returning malfunctioning heads for replacement only to get back used heads with just as many problems are not at all unfounded I m at once really disappointed in the manufacturer yet relieved that the problem and fix is so blindingly simple My solid model probably won t be needed after all as reference for creating a new hot end but in case it would be useful for anyone else here s the sldprt as well as an IGES model and a measurable eDrawings eprt FDM2000 heater tube includes the manufacturing defect just in case I ve been entirely wrong Now where did I put my number sized drill set 4 comments

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1720&replytocom=736068 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Well, there’s your problem…
    CMM in doing the reverse engineering and his custom made nozzles work perfectly so who am I to argue with success I also noticed that on my 2000 s support nozzle the central 0 154 protrusion on the back side of the nozzle actually sticks out by a few thou whereas Craig noted his is dead flat with the outside ring surface There may have been some loose tolerances at work during manufacturing especially in light of what I found on the extruder tube When using some short lengths of wire old solid core phone wire worked well as a pseudo pipe cleaner to push pull out softened polymer goop from the hole that runs through the center of the extruder tube I noticed something rather odd the wire would tend to catch when I pushed it through from the nozzle end It was almost as if there were a constriction in the extruder tube After digging out the last bits of Torlon from the inlet side it still looked like there was some buildup on that end of the extruder After trying to clean it up further with a pick and looking at it through a lighted magnifying lens it became quite clear to me that it wasn t buildup at all but aluminum the extruder tube was poorly made in the first place Here s an image showing exactly how this extruder tube would appear if you sliced it in half The extruder tube appears to have been turned on a lathe before having the 90 degree bend done with the central hole having been drilled through from each end 1 16 drill from the nozzle end and 5 64 from the inlet end as best as I can determine Apparently one of the holes was drilled just a few hundredths of an inch too shallow leaving a nice conic restriction just past the inlet No wonder the blasted contraption had been jamming like crazy Pushing a 05 ish diameter wire though the fully functional model extruder showed that there was no such restriction I can t think of a single reason why you could conceivably want such a restriction in the first place so I can only assume that this was extremely poor quality control on the part of Stratasys apparently the horror stories of people returning malfunctioning heads for replacement only to get back used heads with just as many problems are not at all unfounded I m at once really disappointed in the manufacturer yet relieved that the problem and fix is so blindingly simple My solid model probably won t be needed after all as reference for creating a new hot end but in case it would be useful for anyone else here s the sldprt as well as an IGES model and a measurable eDrawings eprt FDM2000 heater tube includes the manufacturing defect just in case I ve been entirely wrong Now where did I put my number sized drill set 4 comments

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1720&replytocom=745309 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Happy Valentine’s Day
    been up to some amazing work lately In December Pete forwarded an inquiry to the Milwaukee Makerspace from a local mother whose 8 almost 9 year old daughter was born with only partial digits on her right hand She had seen the Robohand video and asked Santa if she could have a new hand for Christmas sorry that gets me a little teary eyed right there A bunch of us immediately offered to help in any way possible I have a small supply of medically approved gamma sterilizable P500 filament that would be perfect for this application but Frankie absolutely tore into the project with unbridled enthusiasm He s been working with others at UWM to develop a truly custom prosthetic for Shea and has actually introduced it into a course curriculum this semester they ll be creating hands for other area kids in need and developing a how to guide for these DIY prosthetics Frankie is still developing the hand for Shea but I can t wait to assist in my own tiny way we have some ideas in mind for customization that should go over well with the end user If anybody out there has any surplus P500 ABSi that they would like to get rid of please leave a comment we can definitely put it to good use This past weekend Shea visited Frankie s lab and got to try on a prototype hand for the first time in her own color choice no less and after a few tries was able to pick up objects with it She also discovered to her delight that she was able to make a big heart with her fingers Excuse me for just a moment I seem to have something in my eye sniff For more information check out the

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1698&replytocom=492207 (2016-04-26)
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