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  • Have Blue [dot org] » About
    abandoning use of the glass plate on his MegaMax printer as he s having better luck with the foil sided PIR foam from the home improvement store Reply Tobias P said 2013 05 22 00 55 Hi Since you were the first to print an AR 15 lower I wonder Would you allow me to use one of your pictures in an article about 3D printed guns for a gun mag waffenkultur com If so please contact me via the e mail I registered with here If you have a picture with an even higher resolution of 22 upper on 3d printed lower jpg buffer tower gap jpg extraction failure jpg that would be even better Also please let me know how you would like to be attributed Name nickname domain something else pick yours Reply William Lumpkins said 2013 06 26 09 20 I would like to use a few of your pictures for an artcile on 3 D printing for the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine If I can get an e mail with your permission that would be great xillia ieee org Reply Have Blue said 2013 09 19 18 32 Hi William I dropped you a line not sure if you got it Let me know what photos you d like to use as I can provide higher resolution ones than what s on the site Reply Editor said 2013 07 07 14 31 Thank you thank you From the Feinstein Project Reply Sputnik said 2013 07 14 21 37 hello sir I have been doing some reading up on your project and given that your project is working with 5 56 and holding up to the strength of the DEFCAB file I was curious if you would be willing to send me the file via e mail so I can print it and compare it to DEFCAB s also what is the sturdiest material one could use to make this from I am very new to this sort of thing Thankyou very much Sir Reply Have Blue said 2013 07 14 22 57 Yes I have a copy of my lower here http haveblue org wordpress wp content uploads 2013 03 ARlower haveblue first version zip However the Defense Distributed version is better the buffer tower on mine is unmodified from Duke Snider s original CAD file and is thinner than on most aluminum lowers so it needs more material to keep flex down The sturdiest material you could make one from would probably be PEEK but there are currently only two machines in the entire US that can print in that material For a hobbyist type machine Taulman 618 is probably as strong a material as you ll find Reply Brett said 2013 09 28 22 02 Hi HaveBlue My name is Brett and I am a graduate student at Montana State University in the MFA program for Science and Natural History Filmmaking For my second year film I decided to go after a subject

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?page_id=2&replytocom=1071843 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » About
    abandoning use of the glass plate on his MegaMax printer as he s having better luck with the foil sided PIR foam from the home improvement store Reply Tobias P said 2013 05 22 00 55 Hi Since you were the first to print an AR 15 lower I wonder Would you allow me to use one of your pictures in an article about 3D printed guns for a gun mag waffenkultur com If so please contact me via the e mail I registered with here If you have a picture with an even higher resolution of 22 upper on 3d printed lower jpg buffer tower gap jpg extraction failure jpg that would be even better Also please let me know how you would like to be attributed Name nickname domain something else pick yours Reply William Lumpkins said 2013 06 26 09 20 I would like to use a few of your pictures for an artcile on 3 D printing for the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine If I can get an e mail with your permission that would be great xillia ieee org Reply Have Blue said 2013 09 19 18 32 Hi William I dropped you a line not sure if you got it Let me know what photos you d like to use as I can provide higher resolution ones than what s on the site Reply Editor said 2013 07 07 14 31 Thank you thank you From the Feinstein Project Reply Sputnik said 2013 07 14 21 37 hello sir I have been doing some reading up on your project and given that your project is working with 5 56 and holding up to the strength of the DEFCAB file I was curious if you would be willing to send me the file via e mail so I can print it and compare it to DEFCAB s also what is the sturdiest material one could use to make this from I am very new to this sort of thing Thankyou very much Sir Reply Have Blue said 2013 07 14 22 57 Yes I have a copy of my lower here http haveblue org wordpress wp content uploads 2013 03 ARlower haveblue first version zip However the Defense Distributed version is better the buffer tower on mine is unmodified from Duke Snider s original CAD file and is thinner than on most aluminum lowers so it needs more material to keep flex down The sturdiest material you could make one from would probably be PEEK but there are currently only two machines in the entire US that can print in that material For a hobbyist type machine Taulman 618 is probably as strong a material as you ll find Reply Brett said 2013 09 28 22 02 Hi HaveBlue My name is Brett and I am a graduate student at Montana State University in the MFA program for Science and Natural History Filmmaking For my second year film I decided to go after a subject

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?page_id=2&replytocom=1155969 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » About
    abandoning use of the glass plate on his MegaMax printer as he s having better luck with the foil sided PIR foam from the home improvement store Reply Tobias P said 2013 05 22 00 55 Hi Since you were the first to print an AR 15 lower I wonder Would you allow me to use one of your pictures in an article about 3D printed guns for a gun mag waffenkultur com If so please contact me via the e mail I registered with here If you have a picture with an even higher resolution of 22 upper on 3d printed lower jpg buffer tower gap jpg extraction failure jpg that would be even better Also please let me know how you would like to be attributed Name nickname domain something else pick yours Reply William Lumpkins said 2013 06 26 09 20 I would like to use a few of your pictures for an artcile on 3 D printing for the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine If I can get an e mail with your permission that would be great xillia ieee org Reply Have Blue said 2013 09 19 18 32 Hi William I dropped you a line not sure if you got it Let me know what photos you d like to use as I can provide higher resolution ones than what s on the site Reply Editor said 2013 07 07 14 31 Thank you thank you From the Feinstein Project Reply Sputnik said 2013 07 14 21 37 hello sir I have been doing some reading up on your project and given that your project is working with 5 56 and holding up to the strength of the DEFCAB file I was curious if you would be willing to send me the file via e mail so I can print it and compare it to DEFCAB s also what is the sturdiest material one could use to make this from I am very new to this sort of thing Thankyou very much Sir Reply Have Blue said 2013 07 14 22 57 Yes I have a copy of my lower here http haveblue org wordpress wp content uploads 2013 03 ARlower haveblue first version zip However the Defense Distributed version is better the buffer tower on mine is unmodified from Duke Snider s original CAD file and is thinner than on most aluminum lowers so it needs more material to keep flex down The sturdiest material you could make one from would probably be PEEK but there are currently only two machines in the entire US that can print in that material For a hobbyist type machine Taulman 618 is probably as strong a material as you ll find Reply Brett said 2013 09 28 22 02 Hi HaveBlue My name is Brett and I am a graduate student at Montana State University in the MFA program for Science and Natural History Filmmaking For my second year film I decided to go after a subject

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?page_id=2&replytocom=1156413 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Stratasys EEPROM hack revisted
    high Resulting in 3 3v output RasPi digital I O is 3 3v not 5v That s all for verifying that the wiring is correct There s one final change to make before we can actually try reading in an EEPROM and that s disabling Device Tree I understand it s possible to get things working with DT enabled by means of some other configuration changes but disabling it altogether is the route I went with Run sudo raspi config to bring up the configuration menu and select Advanced Options Then select Device Tree Select No And DT will then be set as disabled Back at the main menu select Finish and you ll be prompted to reboot select Yes With the RasPi rebooted we re finally ready to read in an EEPROM Recite the magic incantations sudo modprobe w1 gpio gpiopin 4 and sudo modprobe w1 ds2433 note that you ll need to run those commands again if you reboot the RasPi so it may be worthwhile to add them to a startup script Now connect the clips to the EEPROM black clip to the ground pad red clip to the data pad you can tell which is the ground pad because it has a trace on all 4 sides connecting it to the ground plane If you have a scope hooked up you ll see that the voltage drops to 3 3 volts and then there will be a data read every 10 seconds or so We can cd sys bus w1 devices w1 busmaster1 to have a look at the connected 1 wire devices seen by the RasPi and therein is a specific directory created for that EEPROM 23 0000014d4762 in this case your EEPROM will be different You can also use the xxd command to hex dump the EEPROM s full UID as shown 0 2362474d0100006b This particular UID consists of the family code 0 23 which should be the same on all Stratasys P class EEPROMs except for those used on uPrint cartridges the device serial number 0 62474d010000 note the endianness and finally the checksum 0 6b The screenshot also shows a dump of the 512 bytes of EEPROM data itself In order to actually do anything with this EEPROM data though we ll need Benjamin s code We ll cd back to our user directory and then grab a zip archive of the code via wget https github com bvanheu stratasys archive master zip after which we can extract it into a directory via unzip master zip We ll cd into that directory and try running the main program by executing stratasys cli py h This is just what we want to see If instead you get a number of errors mentioning crypto make sure that you have the python crypto library installed At this point we don t need to do any further configuration on the RasPi and we can actually dive into the EEPROM data itself If you ve managed to get this far you re probably capable of basic command line Linux work so I m going to gloss over those details from this point onward and let screenshots do most of the talking First we ll copy the EEPROM data out to a file that we can actually work with A directory listing confirmed that the resulting file is exactly 512 bytes in length and all the formatting looks just like all the other Stratasys EEPROM dumps I ve seen Let s take one more look at the EEPROM UID as we ll need to format it correctly to feed into the stratasys cli program We need to reverse the byte order of the shown UID so instead of 23 62 47 4d 01 00 00 6b we ll use 6b 00 00 01 4d 47 62 23 remember the family code of 0 23 is at one end and the checksum is at the other end Here we finally feed the EEPROM UID and the EEPROM data through the program using prodigy as the machine type any Dimension series machine should be prodigy but a different machine type Titan Maxum etc will have a different family name If you don t have the UID formatted properly the program will fail with a checksum error If we take a quick look at the data everything agrees with the label that was on the cartridge the color serial number manufacturing lot and manufacturing date all match perfectly I m guessing that the timestamp on the EEPROM data is actually GMT Note that while the last use date is a separate entry in the EEPROM data I ve never seen it differ from the manufacturing date maybe Stratasys intended to write this data back to the cartridge but couldn t be certain that the printer itself would actually have the correct day time set A service manual I saw indicated that this timestamp was intended to be the date time that the cartridge was actually first inserted into a machine so perhaps Stratasys intended to have cartridges expire after a certain amount of time The EEPROM stores material quantity in terms of cubic inches A brand new cartridge contains 56 3 cubic inches worth of filament and the current level as shown on the EEPROM is under 0 75 cubic inches so the 1 filament remaining message on the printer s front panel was right on there was actually a little more than that remaining on the reel but the overage allows for nozzle purges waste due to swapping cartridges etc The original hack worked by simply setting the current material quantity back to 56 3 but the printer would remember the serial number of the cartridge so files needed to be deleted on the printer itself Since we can now create our own EEPROM images from scratch we can simply change the serial number in addition to the material quantity and the printer will be none the wiser In addition

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1988&replytocom=1382689 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Stratasys EEPROM hack revisted
    high Resulting in 3 3v output RasPi digital I O is 3 3v not 5v That s all for verifying that the wiring is correct There s one final change to make before we can actually try reading in an EEPROM and that s disabling Device Tree I understand it s possible to get things working with DT enabled by means of some other configuration changes but disabling it altogether is the route I went with Run sudo raspi config to bring up the configuration menu and select Advanced Options Then select Device Tree Select No And DT will then be set as disabled Back at the main menu select Finish and you ll be prompted to reboot select Yes With the RasPi rebooted we re finally ready to read in an EEPROM Recite the magic incantations sudo modprobe w1 gpio gpiopin 4 and sudo modprobe w1 ds2433 note that you ll need to run those commands again if you reboot the RasPi so it may be worthwhile to add them to a startup script Now connect the clips to the EEPROM black clip to the ground pad red clip to the data pad you can tell which is the ground pad because it has a trace on all 4 sides connecting it to the ground plane If you have a scope hooked up you ll see that the voltage drops to 3 3 volts and then there will be a data read every 10 seconds or so We can cd sys bus w1 devices w1 busmaster1 to have a look at the connected 1 wire devices seen by the RasPi and therein is a specific directory created for that EEPROM 23 0000014d4762 in this case your EEPROM will be different You can also use the xxd command to hex dump the EEPROM s full UID as shown 0 2362474d0100006b This particular UID consists of the family code 0 23 which should be the same on all Stratasys P class EEPROMs except for those used on uPrint cartridges the device serial number 0 62474d010000 note the endianness and finally the checksum 0 6b The screenshot also shows a dump of the 512 bytes of EEPROM data itself In order to actually do anything with this EEPROM data though we ll need Benjamin s code We ll cd back to our user directory and then grab a zip archive of the code via wget https github com bvanheu stratasys archive master zip after which we can extract it into a directory via unzip master zip We ll cd into that directory and try running the main program by executing stratasys cli py h This is just what we want to see If instead you get a number of errors mentioning crypto make sure that you have the python crypto library installed At this point we don t need to do any further configuration on the RasPi and we can actually dive into the EEPROM data itself If you ve managed to get this far you re probably capable of basic command line Linux work so I m going to gloss over those details from this point onward and let screenshots do most of the talking First we ll copy the EEPROM data out to a file that we can actually work with A directory listing confirmed that the resulting file is exactly 512 bytes in length and all the formatting looks just like all the other Stratasys EEPROM dumps I ve seen Let s take one more look at the EEPROM UID as we ll need to format it correctly to feed into the stratasys cli program We need to reverse the byte order of the shown UID so instead of 23 62 47 4d 01 00 00 6b we ll use 6b 00 00 01 4d 47 62 23 remember the family code of 0 23 is at one end and the checksum is at the other end Here we finally feed the EEPROM UID and the EEPROM data through the program using prodigy as the machine type any Dimension series machine should be prodigy but a different machine type Titan Maxum etc will have a different family name If you don t have the UID formatted properly the program will fail with a checksum error If we take a quick look at the data everything agrees with the label that was on the cartridge the color serial number manufacturing lot and manufacturing date all match perfectly I m guessing that the timestamp on the EEPROM data is actually GMT Note that while the last use date is a separate entry in the EEPROM data I ve never seen it differ from the manufacturing date maybe Stratasys intended to write this data back to the cartridge but couldn t be certain that the printer itself would actually have the correct day time set A service manual I saw indicated that this timestamp was intended to be the date time that the cartridge was actually first inserted into a machine so perhaps Stratasys intended to have cartridges expire after a certain amount of time The EEPROM stores material quantity in terms of cubic inches A brand new cartridge contains 56 3 cubic inches worth of filament and the current level as shown on the EEPROM is under 0 75 cubic inches so the 1 filament remaining message on the printer s front panel was right on there was actually a little more than that remaining on the reel but the overage allows for nozzle purges waste due to swapping cartridges etc The original hack worked by simply setting the current material quantity back to 56 3 but the printer would remember the serial number of the cartridge so files needed to be deleted on the printer itself Since we can now create our own EEPROM images from scratch we can simply change the serial number in addition to the material quantity and the printer will be none the wiser In addition

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1988&replytocom=1382825 (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Have Blue [dot org] » Stratasys EEPROM hack revisted
    high Resulting in 3 3v output RasPi digital I O is 3 3v not 5v That s all for verifying that the wiring is correct There s one final change to make before we can actually try reading in an EEPROM and that s disabling Device Tree I understand it s possible to get things working with DT enabled by means of some other configuration changes but disabling it altogether is the route I went with Run sudo raspi config to bring up the configuration menu and select Advanced Options Then select Device Tree Select No And DT will then be set as disabled Back at the main menu select Finish and you ll be prompted to reboot select Yes With the RasPi rebooted we re finally ready to read in an EEPROM Recite the magic incantations sudo modprobe w1 gpio gpiopin 4 and sudo modprobe w1 ds2433 note that you ll need to run those commands again if you reboot the RasPi so it may be worthwhile to add them to a startup script Now connect the clips to the EEPROM black clip to the ground pad red clip to the data pad you can tell which is the ground pad because it has a trace on all 4 sides connecting it to the ground plane If you have a scope hooked up you ll see that the voltage drops to 3 3 volts and then there will be a data read every 10 seconds or so We can cd sys bus w1 devices w1 busmaster1 to have a look at the connected 1 wire devices seen by the RasPi and therein is a specific directory created for that EEPROM 23 0000014d4762 in this case your EEPROM will be different You can also use the xxd command to hex dump the EEPROM s full UID as shown 0 2362474d0100006b This particular UID consists of the family code 0 23 which should be the same on all Stratasys P class EEPROMs except for those used on uPrint cartridges the device serial number 0 62474d010000 note the endianness and finally the checksum 0 6b The screenshot also shows a dump of the 512 bytes of EEPROM data itself In order to actually do anything with this EEPROM data though we ll need Benjamin s code We ll cd back to our user directory and then grab a zip archive of the code via wget https github com bvanheu stratasys archive master zip after which we can extract it into a directory via unzip master zip We ll cd into that directory and try running the main program by executing stratasys cli py h This is just what we want to see If instead you get a number of errors mentioning crypto make sure that you have the python crypto library installed At this point we don t need to do any further configuration on the RasPi and we can actually dive into the EEPROM data itself If you ve managed to get this far you re probably capable of basic command line Linux work so I m going to gloss over those details from this point onward and let screenshots do most of the talking First we ll copy the EEPROM data out to a file that we can actually work with A directory listing confirmed that the resulting file is exactly 512 bytes in length and all the formatting looks just like all the other Stratasys EEPROM dumps I ve seen Let s take one more look at the EEPROM UID as we ll need to format it correctly to feed into the stratasys cli program We need to reverse the byte order of the shown UID so instead of 23 62 47 4d 01 00 00 6b we ll use 6b 00 00 01 4d 47 62 23 remember the family code of 0 23 is at one end and the checksum is at the other end Here we finally feed the EEPROM UID and the EEPROM data through the program using prodigy as the machine type any Dimension series machine should be prodigy but a different machine type Titan Maxum etc will have a different family name If you don t have the UID formatted properly the program will fail with a checksum error If we take a quick look at the data everything agrees with the label that was on the cartridge the color serial number manufacturing lot and manufacturing date all match perfectly I m guessing that the timestamp on the EEPROM data is actually GMT Note that while the last use date is a separate entry in the EEPROM data I ve never seen it differ from the manufacturing date maybe Stratasys intended to write this data back to the cartridge but couldn t be certain that the printer itself would actually have the correct day time set A service manual I saw indicated that this timestamp was intended to be the date time that the cartridge was actually first inserted into a machine so perhaps Stratasys intended to have cartridges expire after a certain amount of time The EEPROM stores material quantity in terms of cubic inches A brand new cartridge contains 56 3 cubic inches worth of filament and the current level as shown on the EEPROM is under 0 75 cubic inches so the 1 filament remaining message on the printer s front panel was right on there was actually a little more than that remaining on the reel but the overage allows for nozzle purges waste due to swapping cartridges etc The original hack worked by simply setting the current material quantity back to 56 3 but the printer would remember the serial number of the cartridge so files needed to be deleted on the printer itself Since we can now create our own EEPROM images from scratch we can simply change the serial number in addition to the material quantity and the printer will be none the wiser In addition

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1988&replytocom=1382935 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Gunsmithing with a 3D Printer – Part 5
    the Liberator to which itself we clamped to a folding table In front of the test rig we set up the sensors for my PACT chronograph used to measure the speed of the fired bullet For safety we used a 30 foot length of paracord to pull the trigger Note also that we used machine screws to actually mount the breech block within the receiver rather than 3D printed pins Additionally Joe s barrel was slightly longer than the published Liberator barrel We had a great deal of difficulty getting the gun to fire in the first place making nearly ten attempts to get it to go bang The first issue was getting the sear tail to actually release the hammer so we replaced the trigger bar with one printed on my machine After this the primer was indeed getting struck but it did not seem to be igniting we replaced the springs with ones from my machine as well We would wait 30 seconds after each attempt in case there was a hangfire thankfully we never had one during the testing We wondered if headspacing could be an issue so we pulled Joe s barrel and put in one that I had printed on my machine We also replaced the 380 cartridge we had been using with a fresh one in case it was a dud Our next attempt did indeed go bang and there was very little of the barrel left in the receiver My Stratasys FDM 1600 still has a bit of porosity in its output and I hadn t done a solvent vapor treatment on the barrel as was recommended by Defense Distributed Also the round was a very tight fit and had to be pressed into the barrel it s possible that the bullet became dislodged seating further down within the case and causing higher pressures when fired While the barrel was destroyed we finally achieved primer ignition so we put Joe s barrel back in and continued testing With things finally working if not smoothly we proceeded to fire off as many shots as we could manage during the available sunlight Here s a short video of the successful shots made Lulz Liberator testing video The video hints at some of the issues we ran into during testing We didn t have the retainer for the firing pin installed so the firing pin would rocket out the back during every shot We used a piece of masking tape on one attempt you can see it fly up after the shot to try and keep the firing pin in place but the hole punched through the tape shows that this did not work at all We only had one roofing nail but fortunately Joe happened to have along extra machine screws that he used for assembly and was able to fashion a replacement firing pin each time by cutting and filing it with a pocket multitool We had to make the firing pin longer each time as well since each subsequent shot increased the headspace with the cartridge becoming seated further and further down the barrel each time The 3 screws holding the breech block in place also became noticeably bent as testing continued so we replaced them halfway through Here s what the Lulzbot printed barrel looked like after its first successful firing The cartridge has actually been pushed back a bit hence pushing back on the breech block and bending the retaining screws as noted You can also see white spots forming known as crazing as a result of the internal stress Finally the primer has been pierced allowing gas to erupt out the back of the cartridge which is an undesirable behavior However this is not a fault of the Liberator s design but a side effect of using a roofing nail or field expedient machine screw the sharp nose of the nail or screw actually punctures the primer cup whereas proper firearm firing pins actually have a carefully rounded nose so that they dent but do not pierce the primer In fairness however pierced primers are not a great concern on a disposable firearm such as the Liberator or its WWII ancestor Continually piercing primers will allow the hot gases to erode the bolt face firing pin hole firing pin tip etc in a conventional firearm but for a disposable gun designed to operate only a few times this is admittedly a minor design quibble One thing the photo does not really indicate is how firmly the brass case is actually stuck inside the barrel In a conventional metal barrel the brass does expand somewhat during firing which is actually beneficial in sealing the case to the chamber walls in a process known as obturation The brass relaxes slightly as the bullet exits the barrel which allows the internal pressure to drop back down to atmospheric levels but since ABS plastic is much lower in strength than steel the brass case expands greatly in the Liberator making conventional extraction all but impossible In our case we needed to use a hex wrench and a rock to beat the expended cartridge out of the barrel Unsurprisingly the walls had expanded so far that the case had actually split More surprising to us though was the fact that the barrel bore looked entirely unscathed not only by the projectile but by the hot propellant gases The photo really doesn t show it but in looking down the bore the finish appeared just the same as in the unfired state Both Joe and I presume that there is so much bore expansion during firing that the bullet itself isn t even touching the rifling Granted the rifling would have done almost nothing anyhow a copper jacket is still much harder than ABS plastic We only managed to record two shots with the chronograph we weren t using skyscreens and they probably would have helped The captured velocities were 498 2 and 465 1 fps

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1631 (2016-04-26)
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  • Have Blue [dot org] » Well, there’s your problem…
    a CMM in doing the reverse engineering and his custom made nozzles work perfectly so who am I to argue with success I also noticed that on my 2000 s support nozzle the central 0 154 protrusion on the back side of the nozzle actually sticks out by a few thou whereas Craig noted his is dead flat with the outside ring surface There may have been some loose tolerances at work during manufacturing especially in light of what I found on the extruder tube When using some short lengths of wire old solid core phone wire worked well as a pseudo pipe cleaner to push pull out softened polymer goop from the hole that runs through the center of the extruder tube I noticed something rather odd the wire would tend to catch when I pushed it through from the nozzle end It was almost as if there were a constriction in the extruder tube After digging out the last bits of Torlon from the inlet side it still looked like there was some buildup on that end of the extruder After trying to clean it up further with a pick and looking at it through a lighted magnifying lens it became quite clear to me that it wasn t buildup at all but aluminum the extruder tube was poorly made in the first place Here s an image showing exactly how this extruder tube would appear if you sliced it in half The extruder tube appears to have been turned on a lathe before having the 90 degree bend done with the central hole having been drilled through from each end 1 16 drill from the nozzle end and 5 64 from the inlet end as best as I can determine Apparently one of the holes was drilled just a few hundredths of an inch too shallow leaving a nice conic restriction just past the inlet No wonder the blasted contraption had been jamming like crazy Pushing a 05 ish diameter wire though the fully functional model extruder showed that there was no such restriction I can t think of a single reason why you could conceivably want such a restriction in the first place so I can only assume that this was extremely poor quality control on the part of Stratasys apparently the horror stories of people returning malfunctioning heads for replacement only to get back used heads with just as many problems are not at all unfounded I m at once really disappointed in the manufacturer yet relieved that the problem and fix is so blindingly simple My solid model probably won t be needed after all as reference for creating a new hot end but in case it would be useful for anyone else here s the sldprt as well as an IGES model and a measurable eDrawings eprt FDM2000 heater tube includes the manufacturing defect just in case I ve been entirely wrong Now where did I put my number sized drill set 4

    Original URL path: http://haveblue.org/?p=1720 (2016-04-26)
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