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  • biogs pioneers
    of PIONEERS Surnames B G Barker B ill ings Boyle Carpenter Carre Carrier Cramer Frick Gorrie Galson To view the individual biographies of these Pioneers click on the photographs or

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/biographies/surnames_B-G/surnames_B-G.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • biogs pioneers
    BIOGRAPHIES of PIONEERS Surnames H L Harrison Haslam Holden Ingels Johnson Kell Leblanc Lewis Linde Lowe To view the individual biographies of these Pioneers click on their photograph

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/biographies/surnames_H-L/surnames_H-L.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • biogs pioneers
    BIOGRAPHIES of PIONEERS Surnames M R Meigs Mills Mort Muhl Nason Otis Peclet Pennington Potterton Rietschel To view the individual biographies of these Pioneers click on their photograph

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/biographies/surnames_M-R/surnames_M-R.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • biogs pioneers
    BIOGRAPHIES of PIONEERS Surnames S W Shipley Soane Sturtevant Trane Tredgold Twining Vilter Voorhees Wolf Wolff To view the individual biographies of these Pioneers click on their photograph

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/biographies/surnames_S-W/surnames_S-W.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • khasbagh palace
    the room and with cornice lighting below To avoid any problems from noise and to reduce air resistance the air velocities in the air ducts were kept extremely low Main ducts were designed at 900 1200 fpm while branch ducts to outlets were at 500 600 fpm This resulted in enormous builders work ducts and quite extensive civil engineering problems The room damper control was connected by Bowden cable to the duct in the main masonry duct below In consequence of the requirements for this damper control the main ducts all constructed in masonry came to look like underground railway systems with their lights dampers and pulleys each sub divided in the main duct to control all the air for all the wall chases cut into the walls serving one room and enabling all the air for the room to be controlled from a single handled device ornamental to match the highly decorative Palace rooms The air conditioning plants of that 1930 period consisted of heavy duty equipment comprising Fresh and Return Mixing Dampers pneumatically operated Water Spray Type Humidifier Dehumidifier with centrifugal pumpset three way mixing valve pneumatically controlled and pot strainer Eliminators Steam Air Heater Battery pneumatically controlled and centrifugal air supply fan The atomised spray of water served both as a heat transfer agent as an air filtering system The Refrigeration plants consisted of ammonia compression equipment manufactured by Vilter of USA Bauldelot coil type evaporated contained within a builders work insulated chamber with shell and tube condenser The re circulated water system provided the heat exchange requirements and the cooling requirements were regulated by adjustment of cold to re circulated water to preserve a fixed dew point temperature Reheat was regulated by sensing the temperature of the return air There was a separate plant for each building no zonal control but volume control by damper for each individual room or area The very thick masonry construction provided an excellent time lag which helped to offset the heavy sun load during the hot months Compared with modern equipment it was heavy bulky with a few automatic devices but at the time compared with the then existing more primitive forms of cooling and heating The supervision required with all the air distribution in masonry work was extensive It was essential that the chases in the masonry walls had an inner surface adequately smooth and the corners rounded to avoid air resistance and turbulence Indian masons became quite skilled at the inner plastering using a template to achieve the desired objective The design had to be modified as the Prince s whims in the choice of decoration varied and it was a great test of ingenuity As the magnificence of the work increased so the payments required often caused havoc to the Treasury and Finance Minister would be hard pressed to keep contractors working When the Palace was up to first floor level His Highness was on his daily tour of inspection when he questioned me on the slowness of some of the provisions for the air conditioning I referred jocularly in a quick decision to try a new gambit to the progress being in line with the payments His Highness turned with questioning gaze at his Dewan who burbled about lack of money at the Treasury but admitted that there was a recent replenishment from village taxes and that the invoice for 68 000 rupees could be paid tomorrow at 9 00am if I would present myself at the Treasury His Highness nodded I murmured my thanks Precisely at nine on the following morning I was greeting the Dewan with a cheerful well here I am where s the money the Dewan was neither cheerful nor communicative He summoned his clerk briefly intimated that I was to receive payment and lightly turned to me with the words you won t mind that payment will be in silver rupees but there is no other currency available in the Treasury This shook me but I rallied to say alright where is it the only answer from the Dewan was you ll have to count it yourself There is no time to check it and no one to help you I realised he was underlining his disappointment with my non suggestion of pourboire and I could expect nothing more A treasury chapprasi took me to the counting house chamber and also produced some balance scales for me I counted 50 rupees and weighed fifty against fifty to achieve a hundred Then weighed hundred against hundred until I had a thousand to put in a sack This was repeated until I had sixty eight sacks each holding by weight a thousand silver rupees The chapprasi produced four coolies to carry sacks My Anglo Indian supervisor Davis went off onto the Bazaar to get a conveyance We finished up by purchasing an old bus and heaved the sacks into the back on to the floorboards where normally passengers would have had their feet The sacks filled the centre part fairly completely Davis and I climbed up into the Driver s cabin and away we drove It was now after midday and we had to drive to Moradabad forty miles away the nearest city that would have an English bank The road was well corrugated and we had a river crossing to make that would now be over a sandy expanse of hundreds of yards We had to reach Moradabad before 3 00pm when the bank would be closed It was a dusty bone shaking journey every mile achieved was accompanied by more noises of strain from both engine and floorboards The bus bounced over the ruts and at each bounce the sacks performed a jig and the sound was as if the boards had collapsed and the rupees were going all over the place At every more than usual bump I questioned Davis if all was well and somehow it was as bumped slid and slithered our way Later computations showed that the

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/electronic_books/khasbagh_palace/khasbagh_palace.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • arthur_scull
    all of the page numbers in the Index list below are visitable hyperlinks Place your cursor over the numbers to identify and use the links Arthur Scull Pages 1 5 Country Houses Pages 6 8 and Council Houses Anthony Scull

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/electronic_books/arthur_scull/arthur_scull.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • heard_biog
    1929 1934 Pages 1 4 1935 1946 Pages 5 8 1947 1972 Pages 9 12 MAY 2006

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/electronic_books/heard_biog/heard_biog.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • parcel of boilers
    8 11 Babcox Wilcox W S Deards William Fairbairn Son Fraser Brothers Fraser Fraser pages 12 15 Hitchings Company Gurney Heater Mfg Co Ideal Boilers Radiators pages 16 18 Hartley Sugden Robert Jenkins A M Perkins Son Jones Attwood Thomas Potterton pages 19 22 Lumby Son Wood pages 23 26 H B Smith Company Mather Kitchen Sulzer Brothers Mills John Thompson Peerless Heater Co Trevithick pages 27 30 Weil McClain

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/electronic_books/parcel_of_boilers/parcel_of_boilers.htm (2016-02-10)
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