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  • cornwood_church
    likely to be a form of venting device to remove the air from the pipework when being vented The lack of knowledge of present day heating firms to understand the basic principles of a Perkins sealed and pressurised heating system is made clear in this installation Small size air vent cocks have been drilled and tapped into the hydraulic tubing by the firm so that the pipework could be air vented after repairs and alterations were carried out to the pipework to correct a water leak That these air cocks have had to be fitted in so many places around the pipework shows a disturbing lack of knowledge and their inability to be able to flush vent a sealed pipework system 4 tier sinuous coil in south aisle 4 tier sinuous coil in north aisle The original Perkins heating furnace was sited in a basement room and was solid fuel fired During the earlier part of the 20th century an oil burner was fitted to a new furnace front plate when the system was converted to oil firing In the later part of the 20th century the complete furnace brickwork and heating coils were removed to provide space for a cast iron sectional boiler to be installed At this time modifications to the plant room pipework and their extension into the church occured With this modification the Perkins system was downgraded to a conventional low pressure and temperature heating system with a flow temperature of most likely 80 deg C It is not known whether at this stage it was a pumped system or remained with the original gravity circulation Electricity was connected to the church in 1952 The most recent modification to the Perkins system occurred circa 2004 when a new cast iron oil fired boiler made by Potterton

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/cornwood_church/cornwood_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • corton_denham
    installed beneath the central aisle of the Nave The stove which is installed in a long floor pit is covered by many cast iron open pattern floor gratings which allowed the convected heat from the stove and its flue pipe to rise up into and warm the church The stove was solid fuel fired by coal or coke and a storage area for the fuel was provided within the pit towards the front of the stove Several stone steps were constructed leading down into the pit providing easy access for the stoker to enter the pit and fire the stove It would seem that during the later part of the 19th century or early 20th century the warm air heating system was not considered sufficient to provide adequate heating for the congregation or the Rector so another smaller size heating system was installed in the Chancel area adjacent to the Vestry This took the form of a wet heating system with a bank of large diameter cast iron pipes installed in another floor pit covered with cast iron floor gratings This then provided additional heat to the Chancel area of the church The wet system had a solid fuel boiler installed in the Vestry This boiler was removed during the 1980 s The construction of the stove comprises a cast iron front plate complete with a firing door and an ash clean out door set into a single course of brickwork A square shaped cast iron back plate is attached to the rear of the brickwork from which a long firing tube extends for a distance of approx 2 metres before it connects to a rectangular shaped flue duct that is routed under more open pattern floor gratings towards the Chancel end of the church Metal fins have been fixed

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/corton_denham/corton_denham.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • cowley_chapel
    Dorset St Fleet St London Front view of warm air stove showing firing and ash clean out openings It can be assumed that the heating output from the warm air stove proved inadequate to heat the Chapel and required a wet heating system to be installed some time later probably during the 1880 s in the Victorian period The heating system comprises four box ended pipecoil heaters installed around the Chapel fed by cast iron pipework with the exception of mild steel to the Vestry heater The heaters were made by Garton King Manufacturers Exeter More information about the Garton King firm can be found by visiting their website at http www exeterfoundry org uk Heater in Chancel Heater in Vestry Heater at rear on Nave Heater at entrance door Each of the four heaters has a different height and number of tubes The construction of the heaters is cast iron with their tubes bolted to the box end headers with gaskets and tie bars An unusual feature of the heaters is the removable top hat placed on the top of each header None of he heaters or cast iron pipework has been painted Downward view of the Chancel box ended heater showing the three rows of pipes six tubes high Note the air cock on the top of the right hand box end header Another unusual feature of the heating system was the creation of a natural convector heater in the Nave at the rear of the church This comprised a timber boxing with lift up lid covering four directional slats A double cast iron heating pipe coil was routed through at low level The pipework distribution is a gravity flow return system with three circuits serving the four heaters No cold feed or open vent pipe connections could

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/cowley_chapel/cowley_chapel.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • cropthorne church
    coil heaters The pipe coil heaters which vary in height and length have decorative end header boxes The manufacturer of these heaters is as yet unknown Only one other example of this type of decorative box ended pipe coil heater has so far been found This is in a church in Templecombe Somerset There is a possibility that the pipe coil heaters were manufactured by the local firm Jones and

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/cropthorne_church/cropthorne_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • crowle church
    An advertisement of the firm taken from a 1897 catalogue A 7 row double bank CI box ended pipe coil heater installed in the Chancel with angled flow return connections This end view shows that the casting for the heater was purpose made with its connections angled to follow the shape of the column This view shows the other side of the column with a CI header box that reduces the 2 4 pipe coils to the f r size connections to the pipe coil heater These cast iron header boxes were used to enable the double pipe work runs to change pipe size position and direction as it is most likely that suitable wrought iron pipe fittings were not manufactured at the time of the installation View of the double 4 pipe coil with a CI angle wheel valve Close up view of the valve s flanged top plate with the inscription Messenger Company It is possible to see the ESSEN part of the words Messenger Company End view of the 7 row double bank box ended pipe coil heater in the Vestry with its in line flow return pipe connections To improve the output of the heating system

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/crowle_church/crowle_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • East Brent Church
    at floor level in the aisle The heating system is of the high pressure type as designed by A M Perkins with all the heating system pipework installed at floor level alongside the Pews in the Aisles and on external walls where space permitted One special rectangular spiral heating pipe coil is fitted in the Chancel There are several low level sinuous pipe coils sited around the external walls of

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/east_brent_church/east_brent_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • shipdham church
    years Photographs of the heaters provided by Heritage Group member Geraldine O Farrell The heaters are stood on base plinths which bear the inscription of the name of the installer of the heating system Cooper Vincent Dereham Watton The firm Cooper was listed in the Norfolk PO Directory of 1869 as Cooper Bros of East Dereham This firm no longer exists The second firm Vincent may have been the company

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/shipdham_church/shipdham_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • had been dismantled removed and destroyed If engineering vandalism was rated as a crime then the destruction of this system must stand accused as the perfect example The church dates back to the 13th century whilst the heating system can be dated to around the year of 1887 Queen Victoria s Golden Jubilee The heating system appears to be entirely of cast iron and is a excellent example of Victorian engineering Three different patterns of early cast iron radiators making a total of 3 pairs can be seen in the Church These heaters are all fed by cast iron socket and spigott pipework using caulked and leaded joints 8 row cast iron single bank horizontal pipe coil heater with square boxed ends and bottom external socket flow and return connections 5 row double bank horizontal pipe coil heater with square boxed ends and external socket flow and return connections Circular vertical tube pattern pipe coil heater with top and bottom header boxes The flow and return pipe connections are both sited in the underside base of the heater All the cast iron heating pipework is routed at floor level alongside the edge of the pews on both sides of the

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/elmley_castle_church/elmley_castle_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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