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  • great bedwyn church
    1901 ordered on the 9th January 1860 The entry in the order book is shown below When it is considered that over 7000 of these stoves were made then each one now discovered becomes a living example highlighting the rarity of these items of equipment showing the Victorian craftsmanship with their engineering history and its heritage The later wet heating system in the church appears to have been installed in three stages The first two stages still remain as they were when originally installed during the late Victorian period and Edwardian period The Victorian heating system using cast iron socket and spigot pipework feeding box ended pipe coil heaters was most likely installed in the 1880 s The pipe coil heaters all have decorative end header boxes The manufacturer of these heaters is as yet unknown Only two other examples of this type of decorative box ended pipe coil heater has so far been found One is in a church in Templecombe Somerset the other in Cropthorne Worcestershire There is a possibility that the pipe coil heaters were manufactured by the Stourbridge firm Jones and Attwood Similar style heaters are illustrated in their product catalogues dating from that time period

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/great_bedwyn_church/great_bedwyn_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • hanbury_church
    have been used in the existing structure The church had a major rebuild during the 1200 s and then remained as such until the Victorian era In 1861 the Vernon s a local family of landed gentry who owned nearby Hanbury Hall commissioned Giles Gilbert Scott RIBA an important mid Victorian period architect to carry out a major restoration of the church including a new Nave Chancel Trancepts and Tower It must be assumed that included in the restoration works was the erection of a warm air stove and ductwork system by G N Haden Sons of Trowbridge Wiltshire George Nelson Haden had already worked for Gilbert Scott later to become Sir George Gilbert Scott and no doubt in view of their good working relationship the firm of Haden s was asked to install the warm air ducted heating system complete with its stove This solid fuel fired warm air stove was still in use until the 1950 s Researching the order books of Haden warm air stoves held in the Haden Archive at the Wiltshire History Centre showed this stove to be No 2114 Size 2 dated 20th February 1862 It had the casing renewed in 1882 The discovery

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/hanbury_church/hanbury_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • highworth_church
    from the other churches listed on this website is that details about the heating system were discovered first in the archives at the Wiltshire Record Office A faculty application was found dated 1895 and church documents had been deposited with the archive which showed that the firm of Skinner and Board from Bristol had installed the heating system Previously the Heritage Group have discovered important historical engineering equipment or systems by visiting churches at random when there was a possibility that something of interest might be found there However this visit was primarily to discover whether the original system still remained The good news is that all the original heating system was still installed and operational From the documentation and illustrations found in the archive it is now possible to identify all heating systems previous ly discovered which had their plant and equipment manufactured at the ironfoundry of Vincent Skinner in Stokes Croft Bristol From the selection of various cast iron fittings that can be seen in the church it appears that most of the pipeline fittings are purpose made to suit the individual structural layout of each church building and its arrangement of pews The following pictures are a

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/highworth_church/highworth_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Holy Trinity Church Ventnor Rev 1
    they installed hundreds of their patented warm air stove installations throughout the country The Church was commissioned to be built in 1860 by three sisters Agnes Percy Ellen Thompson and Louisa Julia Percy C E Giles the Architect from Taunton in Somerset was commissioned to carry out the design This wall plaque in the Church dated 1900 commemorates the fact The church has one of if not the tallest spire of any church on the Isle of Wight which unfortunately is overshadowed by St Boniface Down otherwise it would have been a widely noticeable landmark Research carried out at the Haden Archive held by the Wiltshire Record Office in Trowbridge showed in the original Order Book for that time period that the stove was a size No 2 and given the number of 1907 with an entry date of 19th January 1860 Every Haden stove installed was given its own unique number The warm air stove and its arrangement of large builders work air ducts were integrated into the design of the building structure for the church These large builders air ducts were routed underground to distribute the warm air into the Church through seven cast iron floor gratings each

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/holy_trinity_ventnor/holy_trinity_ventnor.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • lady st mary wareham
    pipes was the gift of the Sandford family This was the Rodgetts of Sandford House The two central pew islands in the Nave have a raised floor approx 100mm higher than the adjacent aisles and it is at this change in height where the square pipework is located in a single pipe loop which is in the form of a ring main routed around the four sides of each pew island This square pipework has no supports or brackets and rests directly on the tiled floor Also there is no provision for expansion in any of the long runs This arrangement appears to work quite satisfactorily and there are no signs of stressing in the socketted joints Centre aisle Left hand aisle Right hand aisle What makes these two main single pipe ring loops so remarkable is that there is no obvious flow and return pipe connections It needed a detailed search to establish exactly where the two separate ring mains were fed from It has to be assumed that an internal blanking plate is fitted in the square pipework between the two pipe connections that rise from below to achieve the correct direction of flow The white circles depict where the flow and return pipes connect into the underside of the square pipes Each connection is 100mm diameter cast iron At the tower entrance to the Nave are sited two large box ended pipe heaters each 5 pipes high by 2 rows deep which are also decorated with chevron plus diamond shaped markings Both heaters are piped in series with the square pipework of the ring main and have a flanged stool piece which connects the pipe directly to the box end of the header The circular pipes of the box ended heaters are covered with diamond shaped patterns

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/lady_st_mary_wareham/lady_st_mary_wareham.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • mamble _church
    carried out in 1880 There has been two types of heating installed in the church The original heating was provided by a warm air stove fitted in the aisle leading from the south facing entrance door The stove is fitted in a floor pit under cast iron floor gratings The design of the stove has several external fins to increase the surface area and improve the heating effect The second and later heating system was a wet heating system most probably installed in 1880 when the Victorian restoration was carried out This system includes cast iron pipe coils and box ended pipe coil heaters Tie bars are fitted to the header boxes to hold the cast iron pipe sockets At a later date most likely during the early 20th century the majority of the cast iron pipework was removed and replaced with steel pipework using screwed malleable fittings WARM AIR STOVE The floor pit housing the warm air stove has been used to hide the pipework installed later Note the 6 fins forming the outside of the stove These fins increased the surface area of the stove WET HEATING SYSTEM 6 row double bank cast iron box ended pipe coil

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/mamble_church/mamble_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • nazereth_chapel
    these modifications to the Perkins system had no idea what the design criteria was for a Perkins continuous single loop 3 circuit pressurised sytem The modifications that were made completely compromised the performance of the system such that it would never prove effective in heating the Chapel The fitting of steel panel radiators in the Vestry would not have been beneficial in improving the heating output in that area These radiators are fitted with 20mm TBOE connections welded into the top pipe of sinuous coils There would only be a minimal water circulation through the radiator due the very high resistance through the small bore hydraulic Perkins tubing The removal of the Perkins coal fired furnace and its replacement with an oil fired boiler and circulating pump fitted in the main return pipe condemned the heating system as unfit for use The 3 circuit continuous single loop Perkins pipework in the Boiler room was cut and reconnected as three separate flow mains each with a gate valve to provide a very coarse means of balancing each circuit The three return pipes were then connected together to form a common return to the boiler with a small duty domestic size pump

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/nazareth_chapel/nazareth_chapel.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Northaw Church
    pipework circuits are all routed tight to the floor level along the aisles at the side of the pews The tightness of the return bends is very noticeable and how the Victorian craftsmen achieved this by forging would be interesting to know The marks on the pipe sockets made by the teeth of the assembly tools can be clearly seen Also noticeable is the excessive amount of exposed thread on

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/northaw_church/northaw_church.htm (2016-02-10)
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