archive-org.com » ORG » H » HEVAC-HERITAGE.ORG

Total: 393

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • spalding_church
    design and installation for these churches which included St Paul s Church Spalding The firm of Haden s had a reputation for providing satisfactory heating of Churches throughout the whole of the Victorian period when they installed hundreds of their patented warm air stove installations throughout Britain The firm of Haden has its own Archive of historical records and memorabilia held in the Wiltshire Record Office so research was carried out to check in the original record order book for 1879 This showed that the two stoves were ordered on 6th November 1879 and given the number of 4494 Every Haden stove manufacturered was given its own unique number The stoves were refurbished in 1910 by the fitting of a new smoke case complete with mild steel outlet chimney frames and bolts The remedial work was entered 16th November and given the order number 5512 The warm air stove and its arrangement of large builders work air ducts were integrated into the design of the building structure for the church These large builders air ducts were routed underground to distribute the warm air into the Church through eight cast iron floor gratings each with an approx size of 24 inches

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/spalding_church/spalding_church.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive


  • twyford church
    a nameplate welded to the end header with the name Rosser Russell Charing Cross London This was an important discovery as it is the first example found of this firms installations during the Victorian period St Mary the Virgin was built as a Chapel of Ease in 1846 47 on land given by Robert Palmer of Huntley Palmer s the biscuit manufacturer in Reading The Church is a Grade II Listed building Victorian Heating System The original part of the heating system most likely dates from the completion of the Church in 1847 It was designed with gravity circulation using cast iron distribution pipework routed through floor ducts and wall pipe coils The very small difference in height between the boiler and distribution pipework fitted at low level in the Nave must have contributed to an inadequate level of heating due to the minimal circulating pressure created Edwardian Period Additions Sectional hospital pattern cast iron radiator Boiler Plant During the second half of the 20th century a Trianco gas fired boiler was installed when most likely the circulating pump was added to the system The heating system has always given problems by its under performance and its inability to effectively

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/twyford_church/twyford_church.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ufton church
    ash several inches deep The brickwork forming the sides of each pit is severely scorched and burnt An external search of the church found no basement or undercroft where a furnace could have been sited This indicated there must be an alternative location for the furnace The obvious alternative had to be the various floor pits used as fire pits The ash found in the pits must be the residue left by the solid fuel fire The scorching of the brickwork in each pit is also a positive indication of the very high temperatures reached and emitted by the fire On the removable section of each floor plate is the inscription MITCHELL S PATENT WARMING APPARATUS Mitchell has to be the name of the person who devised this unusual method of warming a Church Although the wording says PATENT a check through all the British Patents issued from 1770 until 1870 shows no mention of a suitable Patent awarded in the name of Mitchell It must be assumed that Mitchell s Patent Warming Apparatus was some form of a wire cage like a brazier which contained the solid fuel fire This cage brazier full of hot coal or coke would have been lowered into the open pit and the cast iron floor plate then replaced with the centre section left open This allowed fresh air to enter the pit chamber to create sufficient draught and induce the flue gases to enter the floor ducts and travel towards the chimney The passage of the very hot flue gases from each furnace through the brickwork ducts would then transfer its heat into the floor slabs and tiles which would then radiate heat by conduction and radiation into the occupied space of the Church The duct openings from the sides of the deep

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/ufton_church/ufton_church.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • all_saints_church_woodford
    the church is covered by several cast iron open pattern floor gratings to allow the convected heat from the stove to rise into the church As the overall width of the stove is greater than the opening provided by the gratings it is apparent that once the stove was erected in its position in the floor pit it could never be removed Front view of top of the warm air stove The firing end of the stove which still has its old stoking tools left in position Rear view of the warm air stove showing the flue outlet pipe The flue from the stove runs horizontally under the centre aisle but the position of the vertical chimney and its outlet could not be found The warm air stove is marked with the maufacturers name Falkirk Iron Co Ltd and is in remarkably good condition considering its age The Falkirk Iron Works was established about 1815 Research carried out by the Heritage Group considers the stove to be of the Gill design which was in production from the 1830 s onwards One of the Gill stove s attributes is that it has 10 sq feet of external heating surface for every

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/woodford_church/woodford_church.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Yarcombe Church Devon
    systems in the same County all with their brickwork furnaces still in use is extraordinary The brickwork furnace shown below has two circuits banks of rectangular spiral heating pipe coils It was original ly solid fuel fired but has now been converted to oil firing Two 4 pipe high sinuous pipe coils are fitted to the pews in both side aisles The Victorian craftsmanship shown in the forming of the

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/yarcombe_church/yarcombe_church.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • yazor_church
    the first half of the Victorian period between 1843 and 1855 and its construction was funded by the local Price family of Foxley The Architect for the church was George Moore but the spire of the church had to be completed by the then Reverend R L Freer as the architect had lapsed into insanity A timber name board at the entrance gives different dates for the Church s construction Wording states St Mary s Yazor an estate church of 1843 1851 The church is of great interest for researchers of Victorian engineering history for its three examples of heating and ventilating disciplines The heating for the church was separated into two areas Chancel Nave CHANCEL A Gurney warm air stove fired by solid fuel is sited against the north west wall For more details about the history of this type of Gurney warm air stove NAVE A separate wet heating system was installed on both side walls in the Nave to provide heating for the occupants of the pews in that area This heating system comprised two flow return circuits of 6 dia cast iron pipework terminating in two very large banks of pipe coils both enclosed in a open latticed timber framework The banks of coils are positioned on either side of the main entrance North side rows of Pews with single pipe South side row of Pews with double pipe Pipe coil risers from floor duct The heat generation for the wet system was provided by a solid fuel fired brickwork furnace sited in a basement room Within the furnace is a heat exchanger which is connected to the cast iron pipework The heating system had gravity circulation Flow return pipes connected to furnace Fuel input clean out doors Side view of furnace in basement room VENTILATING

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/churches_&_chapels/yazorchurch/yazorchurch.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • warm_air_stoves
    or an enclosure and 2 the free standing pattern The search for further makers and types continues 1 Built in pattern Manufacturer John Grundy John Sylvester G J Haden G Haden Son G N Haden John Varle Falkirk Iron Co Gill stove HB H Petter 2 Free Standing pattern Manufacturer John Grundy Robert Howden Charles Portway Musgrave Co London Warming Heating Co Gurney stove McClary London Pipeless Heating Ltd Speirs Co Built in Pattern John Grundy St Helen s Church Abingdon Oxfordshire John Sylvester Osborne House Isle of Wight John Varle St Botolph s Church Burgh Suffolk Falkirk Iron Company Gill Stove All Saints Parish Church Woodford Wiltshire G N Haden Sons St Peter St Paul Mapperton Somerset G Haden Son St John s Church Moggerhangar Bedfordshire Photo by Brough Skingley G J Haden Erddig Hall National Trust Wrexham Wales Unknown St Peter s Church Mattishall Norfolk Unknown St Leonard s Church Butleigh Somerset HB H Petter St Andrew s Corton Denham Somerset Free standing Stoves Robert Howden St Andrew s Church Ombersley Worcestershire Unknown Petworth House National Trust Sussex Musgrave Co St Leonard s Church Rodney Stoke Somerset Charles Portway Tortoise Stove St Leonard s Church Rodney Stoke Somerset

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/equipment/warm_air_stoves/warm_air_stoves.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • unusual_heaters
    finned tube heater with externally fitted tie bars made by the General Iron Foundry Company London This pattern of heater was usually concealed within an enclosure or boxed in Photograph by F J Ferris Quadrant shaped vertical tubular heater made by William Graham Co London and installed in the Old Library Building Cardiff Photograph by F J Ferris 2 Column sectional radiator Cheltenham Pattern with scrolled feet made by G N Haden at their ironfoundry in Trowbridge Wiltshire Note the top bottom tie bars to compress the sections together and the makers name inscribed around the top connection plug Photograph by F J Ferris Heater with 8 vertical tubes possibly made by Hartley Sugden and installed in The National Trust property of Knole House 10 single row cast iron pipe coil heater of unknown manufacturer found in a church in Hallow Worcestershire Photograph by F J Ferris Square ornamental decorative pattern vertical heater of unknown manufacturer Photograph by Brough Skingley 5 double row cast iron box ended pipe coil heater of unknown manufacturer installed in The National Trust property of A la Ronde in Devon Note that all the pipe connections are made with exposed S S couplings to the headers Photograph by F J Ferris An impressive 8 Row Twin Double bank pipe coil heater with rounded end headers Installed in the Harris Museum Art gallery Preston Unknown manufacturer Photograph by Geraldine O Farrell 5 row pipe coil heater with cast iron pipework headers Note the number of cast iron socket spiggot joints used Installed in a church in Litherland Unknown manufacturer Photograph by Geraldine O Farrell Tuscan Flue Ventilating Radiator made by the National Radiator Company installed in a church in Wallasey Merseyside Photograph by F J Ferris 12 row double bank pipe coil heater with rounded box ends and two top mounted decorative cast metal finials Maker unknown Installed in a church in Beccles Photograph by Richard Forster Box ended 5 row double bank pipe coil heater with external tie rods installed in The National Trust property of Lacock Abbey Wiltshire Photograph by F J Ferris Coalbrookdale pattern radiator of unknown manufacturer Note the top hat arrangement Five row double bank box ended pipe coil heater made by Mercer Bros of Blackburn found in a church in Wareham Dorset Photograph by F J Ferris Circular vertical tubular heater that was originally installed in St Mary s Church Elmley Castle Worcs This heater has now been removed and destroyed Photograph by F J Ferris Sunbeam Patent radiator made by Longdens Co of Leeds installed in a church in Brixham Devon Photograph by F J Ferris 15 section National Two Column ornamental radiator made by the American Radiator Company Photograph by Geraldine O Farrell 5 row box ended pipe coil heater installed in a church in South Gloucestershire Note the flanged ends to the cast iron pipes which bolt through the end headers and the 3 pipework connections Photograph by F J Ferris Box ended 5 row horizontal pipe

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/equipment/unusual_heaters/unusual_heaters.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •