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  • unusual_boilers
    been discovered and photographed Three different patterns of the upright tubular boiler as displayed in catalogues RIPON YORKSHIRE When ground works excavations were being carried out for the new foundations being constructed for a building in Ripon Yorkshire it exposed an old firing pit and an upright tubular boiler was unearthed and discovered The cast wrought iron tubular boiler sits on a foundation ring which has an open base that allows the flames from the furnace chamber underneath to heat the water in the tubes The top of the boiler has a circular opening allowing the flue gases to exit through a suitable chimney In picture 2 the firing door can be seen The ash or clinker was removed through the opening which can be seen at the bottom of the pit In picture 1 note the boses for the flow and two return pipework connections 1 2 BATH SPA SOMERSET 1 2 3 4 When builders were carrying out renovation work to a basement room of a residential Victorian villa in Bath Spa they started to clear away a brickwork enclosure in one corner of the room only to find that it housed an old cast iron upright tubular

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/equipment/unusual_boilers/unusual_boilers.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • lancashire_boilers
    Lancashire boiler developed and Patented by Sir William Fairbairn It was the successor to the Cornish boiler designed by Richard Trevithick Lancashire boilers were always set into brickwork and could be used for either steam or low pressure hot water heating systems TRANSPORTING THE BOILERS Photos kindly provided by Mike Drayton DURING ERECTION ASSEMBLY Right hand steam boiler at Coldharbour Mill Devon during its erection Right hand boiler at completion

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/equipment/lancashire_boilers/lancashire_boilers.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • calke_abbey
    of heating in hot houses progressed from the 1700 s and into the 1800 s Chronologically Direct fired brickwork furnaces with chimneys built into the walls that then radiated heat into the glass hot house Direct fired brickwork furnaces with underfloor ducts constructed from brickwork and routed around the floors of the glass hot house Wrought or cast iron cockle stove built into a brickwork structure From the brickwork chamber surrounding the cockle ducts would then discharge their warm air through underfloor brickwork ducts into the hot house LPHW heating systems with either saddle or sectional pattern cast iron boilers Cast iron pipework coils generally would be routed around the inside perimeter to provide the heating It is unfortunate that the majority of the heating system s ironwork had been removed from the Garden buildings This occured before The National Trust acquired the property in 1985 Luckily though much of the original brickwork for the furnaces flues and chimneys together with some cast iron pipework can still be seen Two saddle pattern boilers also still remain Physic Garden and Orangery A Cockle warm air stove still preserved in a reasonable condition This is a pattern of iron stove first provided by William Strutt for a heating system installed in the Derby General Infirmary in 1807 The Calke stove probably dates from 1836 when the cast iron dome was erected Written records show the dome was erected by Harrison who had his ironworks in Derby It is also possible that Harrison cast the cockle stove in his ironworks to the design provided by Strutt The cockle iron stove is completely enclosed within the brickwork furnace and unfortunately therefore it is not possible to establish the internal structural arrangement of the cockle and its associated brickwork That this rare cockle stove still exists affords a wonderful opportunity to carry out remedial structural works to open up the brickwork and expose the front end of the cockle to show its size construction and shape GARDEN BOILERS To date five boilers or stoves have been discovered in the garden buildings Physic Garden Robin Hood New C Pattern Beeston Boiler Physic Garden Saddle Boiler Orangery Saddle Boiler Orangery cockle warm air stove Flower garden Robin Hood Junior Pattern Beeston Boiler Thanks are given to Bill Moffatt who carried out the necessary research enabling the following information to be provided about each of the five boilers or stoves 1 This Beeston Boiler has been dated to after 1930 The New C pattern was first produced in August 1930 and was most probably purchased by Mrs Mosley then the owner of Calke Abbey The boiler has 6 sections and fed 3 circuits a Mushroom House b Vinery and c stove and Cucumber Houses The boiler is sited in a floor pit and may have replaced the saddle boiler which was originally installed in the pit The three circuits were piped in cast iron with socket and spiggott joints 2 This saddle boiler was probably fitted in 1866

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/national_trust_properties/calke_abbey/calke_abbey.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • coughton_court
    but has a striking resemblance to a similar style of heater made by Vincent Skinner at their Bristol ironfoundry The flow and return pipework to the base of the heater is routed through underfloor ducts below the flagstone floors Another wet heating system was installed later during the Edwardian period This fact can be established from the wrought iron pattern pipework fittings and stirrup brackets that have been used with the mild steel pipework The method for connecting sections of pipework uses a preponderance of backnut joints at sockets and most unusually at 90 degree bends and also return bends This style of jointing pre dates the introduction of unions for joining sections of pipework together A most unusual pipework connection arrangement for a sectional cast iron radiator never seen before was found on two radiators fitted in the front hall The end section of the two radiators has been cast with the flow and return pipework connections sited vertically above each other approx 100mm apart Further research found that these were Royal School pattern radiators manufacturered by The Beeston Boiler Co This connections arrangement could be provided to special order for the price of 3 The small Roman Catholic

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/national_trust_properties/coughton_court/coughton_court.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Dinton House
    for stables 14 feet long 2 feet wide and 3 feet deep for stables Grate for harness room Boiler at back of oven to hold 20 gallons Oven will require 100 fire bricks For boiler at back of kitchen grate two 11 4 and two bib cocks with screw bottoms Damper and frame for chimney 1 6 x 6 plate cast iron 3 8 thick Of the first six warm air stoves recorded in the Haden order books stoves Nos 2 6 were installed by James Haden at nearby Wilton House for the Earl of Pembroke only 5 miles away from Dinton Did word about the quality of work that James Haden carried out at Wilton House get passed on to other members of the Aristocracy and Landed Gentry in the Wiltshire area Was this why Jeffry Wyattville the Architect gave the Dinton House order to G J Haden Other records at the WRO show that in 1826 G J Haden installed warm air stoves in the King s private apartments at Windsor Castle These stoves formed part of the major restoration works that Jeffry Wyattville carried out for George IV at Windsor Castle between the years 1824 and 1840 The fact that there existed a working relationship between the architect Jeffry Wyattville and the firm of G J Haden is beyond doubt This must have enabled him to recommend the Haden brothers as competent heating engineers to royalty and his other clients How this working relationship started and what buildings were involved will need further research To find the answers to these questions would be most revealing The location of the Haden kitchen stove and oven is shown below on the Ground Floor Plan WARM AIR STOVE AND HEATING SYSTEM In the basement of the house the original cockle

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/national_trust_properties/dinton_house/dinton_house.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • dunster_castle_1
    early 1900 s manufactured by the National Radiator Company Ltd Plain wall pattern An interesting feature with the radiators is that most of them have a quick opening regulating valve fitted to the return pipe connection of the radiator providing a coarse form of regulation It is unusual to find this type of valve being used on heating systems that date from this period Some examples of the heaters which date from the original heating system still remain in the shape of semi ornate box ended pipe coil heaters most of which are encased in full or flat faced metal pedestals Three different patterns of cast iron heater pedestals are installed which enclose the type of box ended pipe coil heater shown above Pattern 1 Pattern 2 Pattern 3 A remarkable engineering services discovery of a Perkins single circuit HPHW heating system was made in the Estates Offices This is the first Perkins single circuit loop to be found by the Heritage Group A brickwork furnace enclosed in a iron casing that carries the nameplate John King Limited Liverpool This furnace houses a single loop of Perkins pipework and appears to have been the first heating furnace installed but it

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/national_trust_properties/dunster_castle/dunster_castle.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Erddig Hall
    been ordered on the 16th August 1826 by a Mr Hopper the Architect for Mr York the owner of the Estate The warm air heating system has a duct leading from the stove at high level which then appears to enter the floor void of the ground floor Considering that George and James Haden started the firm of G J Haden in Trowbridge in 1816 it is most probable that James Haden himself erected this stove All the materials for this contract must have been transported and delivered by horse drawn wagon from Trowbridge as this installation pre dates the construction of the railways The warm air system then served many floor outlet gratings They are all sited at the entrance to the doorways of the ground floor rooms This Haden warm air system appears to supply heating only to the central and south end of the house At the north end of the house there is evidence that a second warm air stove was later installed in what is now called the Garden Museum In a covered outbuilding can be seen the rusting remains of a Musgrave s of Belfast Warm Air Stove This may well have been the

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/heating/national_trust_properties/erddig_hall/erddig_hall.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Knightshayes
    which powered equipment housed in an outside lean to building As this top gear section and drive shaft have been removed its purpose will never be fully known A reasonable assumption would be that it powered farm machinery Distribution Cabling From the DC dynamo the electrical cables were then routed through a buried cast iron pipe across the adjacent fields to Knightshayes Court approx of a mile away As DC cables generate heat a means of dissipating this heat was needed So an interesting feature of this buried pipe is that it was filled with oil presumably to act as a heat conductor removing much of the heat generated by the cables The oil filling equipment for the cast iron pipe is still installed within the turbine building and carries the inscription Johnson Phillips Brookes Patent Liquid System for Underground Mains Sole Makers Engineers London To store the DC electric current for the periods when lighting was not required batteries accumulators were provided A room at the rear of the courtyard was used to house the batteries accumulators The only examples of the original DC wiring installation inside the house are to be found in the attic area above the servants quarters Updating the Equipment At a later date most probably during the 1940 s the DC dynamo was removed and replaced by an alternator generator manufactured by Brook Motors Ltd of Huddersfield providing power most likely at 415 volts 3 phase 50 hz AC This alternator generator complete with its drive belts and switchgear is still installed within the building The original DC cable network was then abandoned and new AC cabling installed which was routed from the turbine building as overhead cables fixed to poles Any electrical current surplus to requirements could be fed into the National Grid

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/items_of_interest/electrical/knightshayes/knightshayes.htm (2016-02-10)
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