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  • picture_galleries
    services engineering industry The pictures span some 160 years beginning in the early part of the nineteenth century The Gallery has been compiled from books journals trade magazines catalogues advertisements drawings and photographs in the CIBSE Heritage Group Collection There are examples from both sides of the Atlantic The pictures illustrate the changing face of building engineering services over the years with examples of pioneer companies and the systems and

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/picture_gallery/picture_gallery.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • informal_history
    2007 The Heritage Group therefore thought it would be a suitable time to refresh the memories of its old Students by showing pictures of the College Laboratories Plantrooms Library and Lecture Rooms as a trip down memory lane for all

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/national_college/national_college.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • smoke_abatement_exhibition
    Cooking Apparatus Close Stoves 1 Close Stoves 2 Heating Apparatus Open Grates 1 Open Grates 2 Open Grates 3 PART 2 Coal Kitcheners 1 Coal Kitcheners 2 Gas Heating Apparatus 1 Manchester Exhibition 1 Manchester Exhibition 2 Gas Heating Apparatus

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/smoke_abatement_exhibition/smoke_abatement_exhibition.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • queries needing answers
    the Heritage Group with a myriad queries Many of these queries still need answers So any visitor to the Website who may may have an answer to any query is invited to contact the Website Q1 When year location was

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/queries_needing_answers/queries_needing_answers.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • updated pages
    2004 UPDATE MAY 2004 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING Equipment Stoves added FEBRUARY 2004 UPDATE JUNE 2004 HERITAGE PICTURE GALLERY Buildings Structures Brabazon Hangar thumbnail NEW JUNE 2004 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 10 NEW JUNE 2004 HOMEPAGE BOOKS Haden of Trowbridge added NOVEMBER 2001 UPDATE JUNE 2004 VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Perkins Longbottom estimate added APRIL 2004 UPDATE JULY 2004 HOMEPAGE SMOKE ABATEMENT EXHIBITION PART 1 NEW JULY 2004 VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Hadens of Trowbridge NEW AUGUST 2004 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING The National Trust Cragside NEW AUGUST 2004 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFORMATION SOURCES NEW AUGUST 2004 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING The National Trust A La Ronde NEW AUGUST 2004 HOMEPAGE LISTS OF CONTRACTS Haden 1908 APRIL 2004 UPDATE AUGUST 2004 HOMEPAGE SMOKE ABATEMENT EXHIBITION PART 2 JULY 2004 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2004 HOMEPAGE IHVE the EARLY HISTORY Timeline Medals Secretaries Genesis 1910 s 1920 s 1930 s NEW SEPTEMBER 2004 HOMEPAGE IHVE the EARLY HISTORY Genesis 1910 s 1920 s 1930 s additions SEPTEMBER 2004 UPDATE OCTOBER 2004 HOMEPAGE ANNUAL REPORTS Group report for 1998 added UPDATE OCTOBER 2004 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Keeping Things Under Control NEW NOVEMBER 2004 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING The National Trust Killerton House NEW DECEMBER 2004 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Design Aids NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 11 NEW JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Carrier Engineering Company Ltd NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE IHVE the EARLY HISTORY Presidential Addresses 1899 1939 SEPTEMBER 2004 UPDATE JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE LETTERS OF ENQUIRY NEW JANUARY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST MISCELLANEOUS Magazines Journals added MARCH 2002 UPDATE JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Fan Engineering NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST MISCELLANEOUS Magazines Journals webpages redesigned MARCH 2002 NEW JANUARY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST MISCELLANEOUS The Oldest Heating Firm MARCH 2002 NEW JANUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE ANNUAL REPORT 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE IHVE the Early History Oliver Row History 1911 added SEPTEMBER 2004 UPDATE FEBRUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Rosser Russell NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE LISTS OF CONTRACTS The Reck System by James Boyd c 1912 NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS John Grundy NEW FEBRUARY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING The National Trust Kingston Lacy House NEW MARCH 2005 HERITAGE PICTURE GALLERY Systems Equipment Ice Coupons FEBRUARY 2003 NEW MARCH 2005 HERITAGE PICTURE GALLERY Pioneer Companies American Manufacturers York FEBRUARY 2003 UPDATE MARCH 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS John Grundy Patents added FEBRUARY 2005 UPDATE MARCH 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS The Romance of Air conditioning NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2005 HOMEPAGE ITEMS OF INTEREST Miscellaneous ASRE 100 Postage Stamps MARCH 2002 NEW APRIL 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Wilson W Phipson ICE Applications added JANUARY 2003 UPDATE APRIL 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Arthur Scull Arthur Scull Son NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MAY 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Perkins Boiler images added AUGUST 2003 UPDATE MAY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING Churches Chapels St Faith s Overbury NEW JUNE 2005 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 12 NEW JUNE 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Wilson W Phipson The Van Hecke Connection JANUARY 2003 UPDATE JUNE 2005 HOMEPAGE ITEMS OF INTEREST MISCELLANEOUS Household Appliances Gas Cooker Advertisements MARCH 2002 UPDATE JUNE 2005 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Energy Conservation 1976 Drake Scull NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JULY 2005 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 30th Anniversary Issue NEW JULY 2005 HOMEPAGE ITEMS OF INTEREST MISCELLANEOUS Household Appliances Electric Cooker Refrigerator Adverts MARCH 2002 NEW JULY 2005 ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING The National Trust Arlington Court NEW JULY 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Musgrave s of Belfast European Connection of Musgrave DECEMBER 2001 UPDATE JULY 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Perkins More Furnaces Added DECEMBER 2001 UPDATE JULY 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Grundy Rebricking Rejointing the Combustion Chamber FEBRUARY 2005 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE ITEMS OF INTEREST HEATING Other Buildings added NEW SEPTEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS W W Phipson Additional photos of contracts included JANUARY 2003 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS The Times Newspaper article NEW OCTOBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Grundy Hadleigh Church Photos of stove rebricking added FEBRUARY 2005 UPDATE NOVEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Dr Neil Arnott NEW NOVEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Grundy St Peters Church Yaxley Peterborough Cambs Photos added FEBRUARY 2005 UPDATE NOVEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE ANNUAL REPORT 2005 NEW DECEMBER 2005 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS The Perkins Family More family details added AUGUST 2003 UPDATE DECEMBER 2005 2006 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS The Perkins Family Picture and description of Loftus added AUGUST 2003 UPDATE JANUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 13 NEW JANUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS The Perkins Family Pictures and family tree added AUGUST 2003 UPDATE JANUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE IES Presidents NEW JANUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Haden s of Trowbridge Anniversary s added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE FEBRUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Wilson Weatherley Phipson NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE Site Map NEW FEBRUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Air conditioning the Khasbagh Palace NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS The Carrier Absorption Refrigeration Machine NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING Churches Chapels All Saints Church Shipdham NEW MARCH 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS The Heat Makers NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2006 HOMEPAGE ITEMS OF INTEREST Public Health Drinking Fountains AUGUST 2002 NEW MARCH 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS A Parcel of Boilers NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Archie Heard Carrier London 1929 1972 NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MAY 2006 HOMEPAGE IES Presidents Sir Clifford Paterson added JANUARY 2006 UPDATE MAY 2006 HOMEPAGE Links to associated Historical Websites NEW JUNE 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Reminiscences of Bob Caldwell NEW JUNE 2006 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Wilson Weatherley Phipson Photos of contract drawings added NOVEMBER 2004 UPDATE JUNE 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING The National Trust Dunster Castle NEW JUNE 2006 HOMEPAGE IHVE EARLY HISTORY AGM Minutes 1929 1932 APRIL 2004 NEW JUNE 2006 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS John Grundy Promotional Booklet added NOVEMBER 2004 UPDATE JULY 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Culzean Castle MARCH 2002 UPDATE JULY 2006 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 14 NEW JULY 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Drinking Fountains AUGUST 2002 UPDATE JULY 2006 VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS David Boswell Reid MD NEW AUGUST 2006 VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Sir Goldworthy Gurney Commemorative window details added JANUARY 2004 UPDATE AUGUST 2006 HOMEPAGE IHVE Early History Photos of Secretaries Added SEPTEMBER 2004 UPDATE AUGUST 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture AUGUST 2002 NEW AUGUST 2006 HOMEPAGE IHVE EARLY HISTORY AGM Minutes 1933 to 1939 JUNE 2006 UPDATE AUGUST 2006 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFO SOURCES More books added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE AUGUST 2006 HOMEPAGE ANZAC Dispatches NEW AUGUST 2006 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFO SOURCES Additions to Companies People UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE ANZAC Dispatches York Australia added AUGUST 2006 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Other buildings Old Library OCTOBER 2002 NEW SEPTEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Radiator Retrospective JUNE 2006 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING The National Trust Penrhyn Castle APRIL 2004 NEW SEPTEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture More urinals added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Drinking fountain added AUGUST 2002 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2006 PEOPLE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Renton Gibbs Co MARCH 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2006 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFO SOURCES Heritage Magazines Journals NEW OCTOBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels Lady St Mary Wareham OCTOBER 2002 NEW NOVEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFO SOURCES Additional Hospital Info AUGUST 2004 UPDATE NOVEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE INFO SOURCES Heritage Magazines Journals More added OCTOBER 2006 UPDATE DECEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Building Engineering Services Heritage Revisited NEW DECEMBER 2006 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 15 NEW DECEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES Books Written by Members The Haden Family Letters 1810 1822 NOVEMBER 2001 UPDATE DECEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels St Andrew s Aston subedge OCTOBER 2002 NEW DECEMBER 2006 GROUP ACTIVITIES Annual Report 2006 NEW DECEMBER 2006 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture Urinal added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE JANUARY 2007 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Quest for Comfort NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2007 VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Amendments to David Boswell Reid MD AUGUST 2006 UPDATE MARCH 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING The National Trust Calke Abbey NEW MAY 2007 HOMEPAGE NATIONAL COLLEGE for HEATING VENTILATING REFRIGERATION FAN ENGINEERING NEW MAY 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture Urinal added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE JUNE 2007 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Dr Neil Arnott The Times Newspaper articles added NOVEMBER 2005 UPDATE JUNE 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture Urinal added AUGUST 2004 UPDATE JULY 2007 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 16 NEW JULY 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Drinking Fountain added AUGUST 2002 UPDATE AUGUST 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels St Andrew s Corton Denham OCTOBER 2002 NEW AUGUST 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Equipment Warm Air Stoves FEBRUARY 2004 UPDATE AUGUST 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES Books Written by Members Haden Australia NOVEMBER 2001 UPDATE AUGUST 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels St Paul s Bristol OCTOBER 2002 UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2007 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING The National Trust Coughton Court NEW NOVEMBER 2007 2008 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 17 NEW JANUARY 2008 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS The Perkins Family Loftus Patton Perkins watercolour painting added AUGUST 2003 UPDATE JANUARY 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES Annual Report 2007 NEW JANUARY 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Building Services Heritage NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Fire Fighting History NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Schools Colleges NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Plumbing NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Hadens of Trowbridge NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturing the Weather NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Industrial Refrigeration NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Industrial Air Conditioning NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Cinemas Theatres NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS The Story of Rosser Russell NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Elevators Escalators NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS A Pictorial History of Pumps NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS HVCA Centenary 1904 2004 NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Victorian Hospitals Asylums NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Victorian Prisons Law Courts NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Haden Activities NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Drake Scull NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Brightside Engineering Heating NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS J Roger Preston NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING The National Trust Sunnycroft NEW JUNE 2008 HOMEPAGE Newsletter No 18 NEW JUNE 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT LIFTS The National Trust Tyntesfield House NEW AUGUST 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT ELECTRICAL Broomhill NEW SEPTEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Wilson Weatherley Phipson added pages JANARY 2003 UPDATE OCTOBER 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT VENTILATION City Hall Cardiff Wales NEW OCTOBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Ashwell Nesbit Ltd NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING Equipment Unusual Heaters Radiators NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Contractors Mackenzie Moncur Ltd NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Robert Boyle Son Ltd NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Contractors Crown House Engineering Ltd NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers John Henry Mills NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Warren Webster NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2008 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 19 NEW DECEMBER 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT HEATING Equipment Unusual Boilers NEW DECEMBER 2008 GROUP ACTIVITIES Annual Report 2008 NEW DECEMBER 2008 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations M NW Region 75th Anniversary NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Wilson Weatherley Phipson music added JANUARY 2003 UPDATE JANUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers J L Mott NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Consultants Wilson W Phipson FEBRUARY 2006 NEW FEBRUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment The Story of Comfort Air Conditioning NOVEMBER 2004 NEW FEBRUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN HEATING ENGINEERS Renton Gibbs Co Photos of Works added OCTOBER 2006 UPDATE FEBRUARY 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Greenhouse Conservatory heating NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Consultants Phipson Acquaintances Supporters Architects Locations NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations Illumunating Electrical Society NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers The Trane Company NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2009 HOMEPAGE IHVE Past Presidents Biographies NEW APRIL 2009 GROUP ACTIVITIES Historical Equipment Lighting Gas Street Lighting NEW MAY 2009 HOMEPAGE HALL OF FAME Neville S Billington OBE A tribute AUGUST 2002 UPDATE MAY 2009 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 20 NEW JUNE 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Consultants major Consulting Engineers NOVEMBER 2002 NEW OCTOBER 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Electricity NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Sources of Power NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2009 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Magic of Hot Water NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2009 GROUP ACTIVITIES Annual Report 2009 NEW DECEMBER 2009 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 21 NEW DECEMBER 2009 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDING WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT ELECTRICAL Knightshayes Court Hydro electric Power Generation NEW DECEMBER 2009 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Land Sea Air NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Piping NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations Heritage Group Collection NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Comfort Makers 2 NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Records Documentation NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations CIBSE Publications NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations BSRIA History NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufaturers Anniversaries Barber Colman Danfoss Honeywell Johnson NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Carrier USA Centrifugal Refrig Machines 1920 s NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers William Sugg Co The Family and the Firm NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Anniverseries Famous Firms NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Buderus The Family Company Products NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Lennox A Century of Comfort NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Organisations Heritage Group Library Collection of Photographs NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Sturtevant Two published books NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Historical Refrigeration Air conditioning NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Lighting NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Public Health NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels St Paul s Spalding Lincs NEW JANUARY 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Unusual Design Heaters NOVEMBER 2008 NEW FEBRUARY 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Radiant Heating NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous the Best 100 NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2010 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN ENGINEERS Musgraves of Belfast Another warm air stove added DECEMBER 2001 UPDATE JUNE 2010 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 22 NEW JUNE 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Victorian Street Furniture Urinal added AUGUST 2006 UPDATE AUGUST 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Heating Churches Chapels St Nicholas Kenilworth OCTOBER 2002 NEW AUGUST 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Cartoons NOVEMBER 2004 NEW SEPTEMBER 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Lancashire Boilers APRIL 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Carrier UK NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Humour BSE NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Trane Europe NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Manufacturers Willis Haviland Carrier NOVEMBER 2004 NEW OCTOBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Street Lighting NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Electricity Generation NOVEMBER 2004 NEW NOVEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 23 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Sewage Pumping Systems Incinerators NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Boiler Explosions NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Town Gas Manufacture NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Textile Mills NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Country Houses Engineering NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Hydraulic Power NOVEMBER 2004 NEW DECEMBER 2010 GROUP ACTIVITIES Annual Report 2010 NEW DECEMBER 2010 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Stage Lighting NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Waterworks NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Potteries Sanitaryware NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Wind Towers NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Solar Water Heaters NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JANUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE HERITAGE GROUP LIBRARY NEW FEBRUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE Timeline of the Heritage Group NEW FEBRUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE Lists of Contracts Henry Hope Son added APRIL 2004 UPDATE FEBRUARY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Lighthouses NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Lightning Protection NOVEMBER 2004 NEW MARCH 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Brewery Refrigeration NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Systems Equipment Cold Stores NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2011 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Street Furniture more CI Urinals added AUGUST 2006 UPDATE APRIL 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Heritage Books NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2011 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN ENGINEERS Musgraves of Belfast Another warm air stove added DECEMBER 2001 UPDATE APRIL 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous Heritage Guide Books NOVEMBER 2004 NEW APRIL 2011 GROUP ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Public Health Street Furniture CI Urinal added AUGUST 2006 UPDATE APRIL 2011 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Unusual Heater added APRIL 2004 UPDATE MAY 2011 HOMEPAGE Newsletter 24 NEW JUNE 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Buildings Transport Exhibitions Museums Collections Galleries NOVEMBER 2004 NEW JUNE 2011 GROUP ACTIVITIES HISTORICAL EQUIPMENT Landmark Equipment Hall of Fame NEW JUNE 2011 HOMEPAGE VICTORIAN ENGINEERS Robert Renton Gibbs Additional information provided OCTOBER 2006 UPDATE JULY 2011 HOMEPAGE ELECTRONIC BOOKS Miscellaneous H V

    Original URL path: http://www.hevac-heritage.org/updates/updates.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • arnott
    I am sir your obedient servant A COUNTRY GENTLEMAN December 24 1839 DR ARNOTT S STOVES TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir Whenever the air valve of this stove is shut it is converted pro tempore into a retort and the gas generated having little if any current into the smoke flue causes the explosions complained of by your correspondent To remedy this air should be constantly applied to the fire so as to produce a continual current into the smoke flue and the door of the ash pit which feeds the fire with air always opened a few minutes previous to every fresh supply of fuel I am sir your obedient servant W S I December 26 1839 TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir In your paper of the 25 th November a letter appears signed A Country Gentleman on the subject of Dr Arnott s stoves and stating that an explosion had taken place in his house from having used Welsh stone coal I do not doubt the account of the explosion or that the gentleman believes he used stone coal or anthracite Still he must allow me to say he has been imposed upon as I am confident it is not possible to generate gas of a character to be able to lift an Arnott stove off the ground by simply burning stone coal in that or any other stove In the belief that the Country Gentleman wishes only for a satisfactory explanation of a very dangerous and unpleasant consequence I send you my address inviting him to communicate with me when I doubt not I can convince him of what I here state I am Sir your obedient servant ANOPAX December 26 1839 TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir An accident having occurred from the use of Dr Arnott s stove as attested by a Country Gentleman in the Times of the 25 th November I am induced to reply to his letter with a view of affording him and the public at large some sort of protection against similar disasters I should first caution the Country Gentleman against tampering with any engine that has already proved so far uncontrollable as to have destroyed a marble mantel piece and which may in its next freak fracture the leaking glass and other movables The Country Gentleman is misinformed as to these explosions being unusual or unaccountable they are likely to recur as often as the imperfect stove is set in use and are accounted for as follows Most people know that a fish kettle having a lid to fit nearly air tight and requiring a certain force to remove it would in a few seconds after the water contained had reached boiling heat collapse and in proportion to the tightness of the cover so would be the force of the explosion of steam the non explosion of such vessels is owing to the sagacity of the tinman that avoids making them airtight This compliment cannot be paid to Dr Arnott s stovemakers although their task like the tinman s is only to avoid using their skill in making their work airtight TO MAKE AND FIX A STOVE THAT MAY BE CALLED DR ARNOTT S STOVES THAT SHALL EXPLODE AT STATED INTERVALS ON VOLCANIC PRINCIPLES Make a box of cast or sheet iron to contain a furnace of firestone the outer case to have an airtight door through which to supply the coal when opened below is required the ash door also to shut airtight The air valve must shut airtight and be held so by the pressure of a thermometric regulator kept in force within the stove The stove pipe fitted on airtight The stove if set in a large chimney stopped in the bottom quite airtight may be made to explode as follows Light the fire with wood on account of the abundance of gas it will emit Use Welsh coal producing the highest degree of heat Open the ash door that the coal and fire brick may become red hot When highly heated put on fresh coal shut the doors the valve will shut itself and thus you have a first class gas retort warming the room at the same time with the utmost economy indeed without combustion as no air enters to combine with the heated carbon In time the stove and chimney become filled with hydrogen gas as the heat falls in the furnace the valve opens a little undulation in the pressure of the atmosphere or the opening of a door will force air through the valve which being mixed with the hydrogen gas in the stove on coming in contact with the red hot coal produces an explosion the power of which is proportionate to the quantity of gas accumulated and the method taken to confine it The house might be thrown down by stopping the chimney pot also airtight after the full heat is obtained Dr Arnott s stoves with doors ground together and a regulator receiving the internal heat are liable to explode from the above causes that is the exclusion of air by regulators acting imperfectly As several accidents have occurred from the use of airtight stoves I presume this information may deserve a place in The Times I am Sir your obedient humble servant A PNEUMATICIAN December 26 1839 TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir That Dr Arnott did not take out a Patent for his invention has proved a serious misfortune to the public In every street of this metropolis stoves are offered for sale bearing the Doctor s name of which not 1 in 50 is made in accordance with the principles he has laid down Hence imperfect stoves as well as improper management bring unmerited disgrace upon the invention From the description given by Country Gentleman of the stove either that was imperfect or he was doing what should not be done the ash pit door probably open The chief thing is to let it alone for a good stove when regulated want little more than for the servant once in the 24 hours to put on a little fuel and take away the ashes Respecting the letters which you have inserted I beg leave to make a few observations having had some practical experience W S I is not right for in a well regulated stove the valve will sometimes be closed but when the stove cools and the valve is reopened its action is so gentle that combustion does not go on at a rate sufficient to produce explosive gas in any dangerous quantity He is decidedly wrong as to the ash pit door that should never be opened except when necessary for the removal of the ashes With ANOPAX I cannot agree never having met with anthracite coal so pure but that by leaving open the ash pit door thereby most rapidly generating the gas the stove becoming a furnace and retort mark Sir those who have Dr Arnott s stoves are strictly enjoined not to do this I could effect what the doctor in his book terms a semi explosion that is a jet of blue flame from the feeding door the moment it is opened and I know of a stove which blew up at the makers the ash pit door having been left open The stove of Dr Arnott when properly constructed and regulated is a great comfort as well as a great saving both in fuel and attendance R R Threadneedle Street December 26 1839 DR ARNOTT S STOVES TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir My object in addressing a letter to you for insertion in your valuable journal on the subject of what are called Dr Arnott s stoves was to accomplish precisely what has been the result to elicit information for myself and to further the doctors well known and approved philanthropy I should have addressed a private letter to Dr Arnott for information but considered the value of his time did not think myself entitled If on public grounds you Sir consider this further explanation worth insertion I feel it due to Dr Arnott thus to communicate he having addressed you on the subject as appears in this days journal being still anxious to have a stove on his principle After I sent you my first letter I requested the maker of the stove to come down hoping that he might be able to discover the cause of the accident He came and brought for my satisfaction as he stated and not from any want of confidence in his own judgement a rival stove maker to ascertain if there was any fault in the construction of the stove They remained with me nearly two hours and determined that the fault rested entirely in the chimney and that the explosion mustand preventing the gas escaping or from the size of the chimney the very wet weather having so chilled the chimney that the gas lingered at the bottom The mantelpiece not having been mended have occurred from the wind blowing down there was now a current of air in the chimney and being a very fine day both the gentlemen thought the circumstance would not occur again and therefore put fuel on the fire and it seemed to act very well while they were here but in order to makeaperture out of the stove and that there should be 50 feet of iron pipe reaching from the sure everything was secure they advised that the fireplace should be entirely bricked up and contracted to the size of the stove to the top of the chimney which if done the maker agreed should any further accident occur he would make good all the damage They then left me between 2 and 3 o clock and we were much delighted in the prospect of being able to keep Dr Arnott s stove Everything appeared to go on well although I am not aware that anyone particularly noticed it but at before a quarter to 5 a most tremendous explosion took place shaking the house and bringing together every inmate to ascertain the extent of the damage The stove had burst driving up the inner case and scattering the plaster of Paris with which it had been fixed about the room lifting also the loose top which had again struck the mantelpiece remaining and breaking it bursting also the whole of the setting of the pipe from the stove I am satisfied that this time the explosion took place in the stove and I am inclined to think it was so before and that the stove being lifted off the ground struck and broke the mantelpiece and that it was not broken from the force of gas from within the chimney As soon as the first explosion took place and before the stove maker came down I wrote to the coal merchant for the names of some persons who were using the same coal he had sent me in Dr Arnott s stoves He sent me eight names of persons residing as follows Whitehall Place Upper Gloucester Place Hereford Street Suffolk Place Notting Hill Kings Road Goldsmith Street and Hanover Square This I take for granted is a certificate that the coal was the proper anthracite coal Dr Arnott in his letter is silent with regard to the chimney If the Doctors stove is not affected by a large chimney I should be glad to know in what it differs from the stove I have had This I am quite satisfied of that it is necessary that those who use them should do so with care and caution I am pleased to hear that the doctor is about to republish his work which I have endeavoured to procure but without success I am Sir your obedient servant A COUNTRY GENTLEMAN January 1 st 1840 DR ARNOTT S STOVES TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES Sir Allow me to thank you for the insertion of my two former letters in your valuable journal upon the subject of these stoves It has been the means of obtaining for me some very useful information which I might not otherwise have been able to have received The stove maker complains that I have done him an injury by the publicity I have given to what has occurred in my house from his stove sold to me as one of Dr Arnott s He thinks that the whole facts and circumstances should be published by him together with such observations as he may think necessary to make and if he had my concurrence he thinks it would be as well to do so with names of parties I have written him that I can have no possible objection to any publicity which he may think it necessary to give in his own justification and I am satisfied that you Sir will afford him the opportunity if he should think it does to his or not As I have fully paid for my experience I think I am entitled to give the public the benefit of it exclusive of the damage to the mantelpiece and the alarm occasioned to the inmates of the houses I have paid for cartage twice to and from the country to take and bring away the stove fixing stove in dining room and taking down again the latter performed by my own work people including bricklayers work men s time and expenses going to examine the stove after the first explosion repairing the stove after using etc bursting As I have not in either of my former letters named any stove maker in particular I cannot see how I can have done this gentleman any injury more than every other maker of what are called Dr Arnott s stoves That such stoves as I have had are highly dangerous and explosive under almost any management I feel justified in reasserting and I feel satisfied that the publication of my letters has done some public good and very little private wrong But the stove maker is not the only party who complains Your correspondent ANOPAX in a private letter to me says he is much interested in the clear elucidation of the repeated accidents in my house as much as on behalf of the public as his own private account being a very extensive holder of anthracite coal property and he feels confident that my coal merchant has either sent me an article not anthracite at all or if so in any part it is mixed with other coal He thinks my coal merchant may have been imposed upon himself for since the newly created demand for anthracite many unprincipled people have taken advantage and put off all sorts of rubbish under that name I have given him the name of my coal merchant and offered to send up some of the coal if desired I have not since heard from ANOPAX and therefore hope that I have not done any private injury to this gentleman That there are some persons that mix this article I can believe and that the public should be very cautious whom they buy anthracite coal of for since I wrote to you first I have heard of a great many other explosions That my coal is the real anthracite and not mixed I am quite satisfied from its having been tested by many others as well as those interested in its condemnation as those who have long so used it My next correspondent is the philanthropic Dr Arnott who regrets that I did not mention in either of my published letters that the stove in question was not one made or managed according to directions given in his book Upon receipt of this letter I lost no time in calling on the Doctor and assuring him that I could not say that the stove was not one made or managed according to his directions for I certainly never should have admitted such a dangerous and destructive instrument into my house unless I had fully believed that it was one made according to his direction and I had taken great pains to inquire and thought I had put myself into first rate hands The Doctor s book I had never seen although I had tried to get a copy I am now anxious to do an act of justice to the doctor in stating that I find from him that my stove was not made or regulated according to his directions and that if it had been no accident such as has occurred could have happened or that there would have been any occasion to have found fault with or to have condemned my chimneys I think the doctor s stoves will increase in popularity notwithstanding these circumstances am so satisfied am I that the fault was not in the chimneys that I intend trying again The doctor in a few days will publish his new treatise giving an account of the stoves at the Custom house and make his plan appear so clear that every stovemaker who chooses may make them but to relieve the fears of the more timid part of the public he will name a scientific person who will examine any stove that he may be requested and certify whether it is made strictly according to Dr Arnott s directions or not Upon a future trial let the decision rest whether I have done the stovemaker injustice in guarding the public without naming anyone or whether I may not justly complain that I should have had such an instrument sent into my house without any caution or hint of danger but informed in the first instance by the warehouseman that the village bricklayer might set it I feel quite unconscious of having done anyone a private injury by any publication that I have given to this

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  • davidson
    K B E M I Mech E Davidson Co continued the development of equipment for cooling drying dust collecting heating ventilating mechanical draught pneumatic conveyance and mechanical handling for mine ventilation they manufactured some of the largest fans in existence They also began to make large air pre heaters for use in conjunction with their fans mostly for power station use 3 4 metre diameter Sirocco two stage axial flow

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  • reid
    deep a means of heating and moistening the air this was done in a chamber below the House connected from below to an equalising plenum space immediately below the floor the facility to mix the heated air with unheated fresh air so that the temperature of supply could be varied as required ie there was a recirculation duct a means of controlling the speed of throughput of air this was done with a single valve between the extract duct in the roof space and the downcast shaft connected to the furnace and chimney the facility to run cold water through the heating pipes in summer to provide cooling and dehumidification ice could be used in extreme weather Reid appears to have taken his duties very seriously and he would often stay in personal control of the system when the House was in session His instructions were that the velocity of air supply was to be varied not only in relation to temperature but also in relation to the numbers present He recorded that the number of variations applied to the system over a single sitting often varied between 50 and 100 The velocity of the air was to be increased when the temperature was high and he indicated that the building should be cooled overnight in summer by drawing air through it when the Members have retired In very hot weather cold mains water could be supplied to the heating coils or the air could be cooled in rare cases by the use of ice however he adds but no mode is more capable of regulation so economical and so readily available as a variation of velocity 1844 Not only do we have an engineer here who understood the benefits of night purging he also gave much consideration to economy of system operation One or two details of the system indicate Reid s thoroughness and are worthy of special mention Reid made sure that the atmosphere supplied to The Speaker was separately controlled since he may be required to remain still for long periods of time he also realised that people in the galleries would require a higher velocity for comfort because they were that much nearer to the gas lights which by their very nature radiated large quantities of heat It was possible for the controller of the system in the lower levels to check on the temperature in the House by means of a thermometer which could be raised and lowered by means of a cord and pulley The Houses of Parliament 1852 Reid s involvement in the New Houses of Parliament Building which began almost as soon as Charles Barry had been appointed architect did not lead to such a successful outcome Barry who was ten years older than Reid did not take kindly to being told how wide or how high his towers had to be for ventilation purposes The Commons Committee charged with investigating proposals for the New House had recommended that the whole space immediately below the two houses as well as between the ceiling and Roof should be prepared and altogether reserved for such arrangements as may be necessary Parliamentary Papers 1835 583 However it was apparent that Barry was unwilling to make the architecture subservient to the ventilation and he continually put obstacles in Reid s way complaining for example about the costs of the central vitiated air tower the ducts under the floors and roofs the vertical airshafts etc In 1845 there was a major row between the two men and Barry accused Reid of creating problems Reid who had very strong opinions and a fiery temper became so perplexed with the fact that Barry kept making alterations without Reid would claim due authority that he was determined to cast off all responsibility unless proper arrangements were made in future for controlling the proceedings of the architect 1858 Between 1846 and 1852 he would only attend the project under protest and his salary was stopped Building work was held up for four years at one point Reid s original scheme which involved taking in air from high level at both ends of the building through the Clock Tower Big Ben and the Victoria Tower and allowing vitiated air to escape through a spire shaped tower over the Central Hall was never fully brought to fruition He was unfairly pilloried in the press especially The Times and ridiculed in Punch In addition to his work on the heating and ventilation Reid was called upon to use his expertise in acoustics to improve matters in the House of Commons and the ceiling was lowered on his recommendation He was also asked in 1844 to design the gas lighting for both Houses but in 1846 the lighting of the Lords was given to Barry Reid used 64 Argand burners behind glass panels to light the Commons after the ceiling had been lowered with what were probably the very first air handling fittings In 1852 the Peers were persuaded by the Marquis of Clanricarde to isolate their House from his plan despite the dissenting voice of the Duke of Wellington amongst others The Government followed the Lords lead and handed over all design to Barry however a few weeks later they repented and asked Reid to come up with a satisfactory solution for the House of Commons The building was physically split by means of screens below the Central Hall so that Barry could ventilate the Lords and Reid the Commons although Reid still maintained that he could not produce a working system unless more control was placed on the architect by the Government The result of this was that neither system worked properly when eventually they were first occupied for business at the start of the 1852 session Reid was once again expected to shoulder the blame but he had been constantly requesting a full investigation of the whole process and eventually in a vote which called him to the Bar of the House the Government was defeated by more than two to one He then pointed out the utter impossibility of their having any comfortable atmosphere in their New House until Barry s alterations to the original arrangements were put right He was then empowered by the Government in addition to other works adopted immediately during that session to execute no less than thirty five recommendations which he afterwards made He was also granted the arbitration he had so long demanded and he insisted on his right to cross examine the architect at the enquiry which followed Reid s cross examination of Barry lasted for seven successive days and the whole investigation took thirty days Reid was awarded compensation totalling over 3 700 he was also paid six years salary 4 400 retrospectively This was presumably the first case of a person suing the Government for unfair dismissal The fact that Reid was totally vindicated appears to have been forgotten by later writers for example Sir Robert Cooke Cooke 1987 A major bone of contention between Reid and Barry was that Reid did not seem to consider draughting to be part of his work and he steadfastly refused to produce any drawings He must surely be criticised for this but strangely he was quite happy to produce drawings for St George s Hall and so one might deduce that this had more to do with his problems with Barry than with obstinacy Percy reported Parliamentary Papers 1866 981 that there are many hundreds of air courses under as well as above ground beneath floors in walls over ceilings and in roofs there are enormous smoke flues running horizontally within the and immediately under the roofs with hundreds of chimneys in communication there are it is asserted steam pipes of which the aggregate length is about 15 miles and about 1200 stopcocks and valves connected with these pipes and there is a multitude of holes and crannies as intricate and tortuous as the windings of a rabbit warren It took Percy and two draughtsmen over six months to make a record of the building services as they existed at that time During the time he was involved with the Houses of Parliament Reid was a Commissioner of the Health of Towns Commission which eventually led to the enabling of the Public Health Act St George s Hall Liverpool 1841 1855 In Liverpool in the early Nineteenth Century a triennial music festival had been held for a number of years and the Merchants of the City who had grown rich importing goods such as cotton tobacco and rum decided that the city should have a large purpose built hall for this festival The main concert hall was to be big enough to hold 3000 people plus an orchestra or choir of up to 400 The City Merchants were so confident that they could raise the money that the Foundation Stone was laid on the day of Queen Victoria s Coronation in June 1838 A design competition was announced in The Times in March 1839 and the design of the young London architect Harvey Lonsdale Elmes was chosen in July 1839 However the Merchants had only raised about 30 000 which would not have allowed Elmes grandiose classical concert hall building to be erected and it was very fortunate that the Law Courts Committee of the city had obtained funding for a new court building This was to house the main Crown Court and a Civil Court of similar size Another competition was announced for the new court building and there was considerable disquiet among the other entrants when it was announced several months after the closing date that Elmes had also won this competition and within weeks that the two buildings were to be combined A few months later Elmes who had been to lectures given by Reid about ventilation in London requested that the Law Courts Committee appoint Reid as Ventilator and he was appointed in April 1841 Reid s original plan allowed for all flues and fireplace chimneys and all vitiated air to be brought down to basement level and taken through underground tunnels to a vast ventilation chimney behind the proposed Daily Court Building on the opposite side of the street He had stated in his book that it should be possible to provide hot water steam and ventilation to districts in the same manner as gas water and sanitation 1844 Considerable construction work had been completed in fact work had reached the principal floor of the Great Hall when the intention of constructing new daily courts was abandoned and the whole suite of arrangements for warming and ventilating had to be altered Reid 1855 Reid explained that this change meant that some of the minor apartments had now to rely on doors and windows for ventilation because of the expense that would have attended a different arrangement of vaults and foundations such as would have been more suitable had they been commenced on the plan now adopted 1855 Despite the difficulties outlined above and the fact that the building with its Great Hall two separate Law Courts and Small Concert Room resembled a series of separate public buildings aggregated together rather than one single building it was a triumph for both Elmes and Reid in terms of its functionality It is considered by many to be the world s first air conditioned building and in 2005 was awarded a plaque by the Heritage Group to this effect All of the features Reid had outlined as essential for successful application of systematic ventilation were incorporated into the warming or cooling and ventilation arrangements for the principal spaces The main driving force was a 16 hp 12kW steam engine driving four vast paddle fans 10ft 3m in diameter with blades 5ft 1 5m by 2ft 6in 0 75m By varying the speed of the steam engine and changing the number of fans operating at any one time the air supply rate could be varied from 1 000 ft 3 min to 50 000 ft 3 min 0 5m 3 s to 25m 3 s The air was heated by means of two hot water boilers and two steam boilers all fuelled by coke Reid was very conscious of the health problems associated with chimney smoke in cities The two main heating coils the Great North and the Great South Water Apparatus consisted of 72 x 4in 100mm steel pipes about 30ft 10m long There are two smaller coils for heating the Small Concert Room and the North Entrance Hall and one for the South Entrance Hall In addition there were 27 pipe coils heated by the steam boilers The steam coils were only to be used in extremely cold weather because of Reid s belief that heating the supply air to a very high temperature was detrimental to comfort However in winter the steam coils would be employed for pre occupancy warm up This was effected by closing all the normal escape routes for vitiated air and re circulating the air to the fan chamber by allowing the flow to be reversed through the low level supply grilles in the Great Hall Humidification was obtained by direct injection of steam into the air stream under the main heating coils Reid insisted that this steam must come from a separate boiler used solely for that purpose and that only copper pipes were to be used in association with it A complicated system of ducts and valves allowed treated air to be sent to any combination of the principal spaces or where a very rapid warm up was required all four fans could be made to operate on a single space The valves in this case are large doors of sized canvas over a timber frame Wooden louvre dampers and canvas roller blinds were used for fine tuning Supply from the main system into all the principal rooms is at low level but the system allowed supplementary untreated fresh air to be introduced directly as required Vitiated air was encouraged to escape from the Great Hall into the roof space the roof having louvres round all four sides but below the parapet Extract grilles with openable flaps above were skilfully incorporated into the ceiling decoration The roof louvers were controlled so that only those facing away from the wind direction would be opened All other principal rooms and many of the ancillary spaces had their air extracted into four main vertical extract shafts one next to each corner of the Great Hall Each of these also contained a boiler flue Fish tail gas jets could be burned at the bottom of these or in one case a coke brazier to boost the buoyancy of the air and increase the extract rate Chimney flues from those rooms with fireplaces were fed into a separate vertical flue alongside these shafts and again when necessary a coke brazier or gas jet could be ignited at the bottom of these vertical flues The rate of extract from the Court Rooms could be closely controlled by adjusting flaps in the roof space For the two Courts and the Small Concert Room it was possible in warm weather to allow vitiated air to escape directly out of the roof space Reid provided extremely comprehensive instructions for the successful operation of the system These run to about 12 pages approximately A2 and include almost 50 diagrams of the necessary arrangements They are a veritable Building Handbook and must say something about Reid s pride and satisfaction in the building since there was no equivalent publication for Parliament They include reference to the importance of regular and recorded maintenance guidelines on the most economic modes of operation for different occupational requirements hints on how to make maximum advantage of the thermal capacity of the vaults under the Great Hall a recommendation that a log be kept of the settings required to provide equitable conditions for different numbers and patterns of occupancy and even a detailed specification of the person who should be put in charge of ensuring the correct operation for optimum comfort and energy efficiency Those who may in future have to direct the ventilation of this great building are presumed to have given evidence of their having paid special attention to the subject of ventilation and the more they may have attended questions of practical chemistry bearing on warming and ventilation as well as to natural philosophy architecture apparatus and machinery the more eligible they must be considered for the appointment in question Reid 1855 Reid goes on to say that after this person is appointed and has familiarised himself with all the diagrams in the manual and the principles in his book Illustrations of the Theory and Practice of Ventilation Reid 1844 he will only achieve satisfaction for the occupants with skill and delicacy And for this purpose he cannot at first too often take his seat in every place when the apartments are crowded from the Judge s bench to the open stand where an almost unlimited access is given to the public and from the platform for speakers or performers to the seats occupied by the audience 1855 The Later Years in the United States Shortly after Reid produced his operation manual for St George s Hall in 1855 he emigrated to the United States where his younger brother Hugo was Professor of Chemistry at the College of Pharmacy in New York Reid was recommended by The American Ambassador in London James Buchanan President from 1857 to Montgomery Meigs an Army Engineer who had since 1853 been employed on The Capitol in Washington The project was described as an extension to The Capitol but it was at this time that the dome was added and the legislative chambers as they exist today were constructed The chambers were to be designed without windows and so light and air were to be supplied by artificial means Meigs records in his

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