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  • Better Angels
    although it is true the rebellious Southern Democrats had been represented in the same hustings by Vice President John C Breckinridge of Kentucky Not yet sworn in Lincoln said in his inaugural speech that while he had no intention of interfering with the institution of slavery he also felt No state on its own mere action can get out of the Union He waxed a bit poetic and was obviously appealing for goodwill on all sides when he said to a nation not yet one century old the American Revolution only about eighty years earlier The mystic chords of memory stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched as surely they will be by the better angels of our nature More bluntly he warned In your hands my dissatisfied fellow countrymen and not in mine is the momentous issue of civil war The government will not assail you You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors You have no oath registered in Heaven to destroy the government while I have the most solemn one to preserve protect and defend it And so the immediate issue was not slavery but secession Or as Lincoln saw it the Union the Union the Union He was sworn in after his speech incidentally by Chief Justice Roger B Taney the jurist famous for his majority opinion in the Dred Scott case which declared a slave was not a citizen with the right to sue in a Federal court Taney was from Maryland a Democrat and a former slave owner himself Lincoln had spent the night at Willard s Hotel and he rode to the Capitol in an open carriage accompanied by

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/better_angels.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • What was it like
    a dozen or 20 of your comrades lie wounded or dying at your feet a strange involuntary shrinking steals over you which it is impossible to resist Maine officer Now as every man with hardly an exception was either killed wounded hit in the clothes hit by spent balls or stones or jostled by his wounded comrades it follows that we had a wonderful exhibition Some reeled round and round others threw up their arms and fell over backwards others went plunging backward trying to regain their balance a few fell to the front but generally the force of the bullet prevented this except where it struck low and apparently knocked the soldier s feet from under him Many dropped the musket and seized the wounded part with both hands and a very few fell dead Rebel colonel We were soon ordered to charge and drove the enemy through the tall prairie grass till they came to a creek and escaped We passed some of the dead and wounded the first sad results of real war that I had ever seen Unnamed soldier You feel inclined neither to advance nor recede but are spell bound by the contending emotions of the moral and physical man The cheek blanches the lip quivers and the eye almost hesitates to look upon the scene Maine officer The enemy were armed with every kind of rifle and musket and as their front was three times ours we were under a crossfire almost from the first The various tunes sung by the bullets we shall never forget The fierce zip of the Minié bullets was not prominent by comparison at that particular moment though there were enough of them certainly The main body of sound was produced by the singing of slow round balls and buckshot fired from a smooth bore which do not cut or tear the air as the creased ball does Each bullet according to its kind size rate of speed and nearness to the ear made a different sound They seemed to be going past in sheets all around and above us Rebel colonel At night the heavens opened wide the rain fell in torrents not even a campfire could be kept to light up the impenetrable gloom and I sought a comfortable mud hole to sleep as best I could The pale rigid faces that I had seen turned up for the evening sun appeared before me as I tried in vain to shield my own face from the driving rain and as the big foot of a comrade blundering round in the darkness splashed my eyes full of mud I closed them to sleep muttering to myself And this is war Unnamed Soldier In this frozen attitude you may perhaps be ordered to stand an hour inactive havoc meanwhile marking its footsteps with blood on every side Finally the order is given to advance to fire or to charge And now what a change With your first shot you

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/first%20time.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • Great Men Doing Great Things
    Pope After a period of time the woman was convinced that she was being visited by an angel of God and eventually confided her strange dream to the Pope He told her that he had been having the same dream only in his he was told that a child would be born and the child would be the Christ Himself come back to establish his holy kingdom The woman agreed

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/great_men_doing_great_things.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • An April Fool
    been the custom but instead should be celebrated on January 1 Most of Europe went along with the change as it corrected serious errors in the planting season shipping and commerce and religious dates However as bad feelings were common amongst Catholics and Protestants many Protestants ignored the change ordered by the Catholic Pope and continued to use the old calendar To them the new year began on April 1and

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/an_april_fool.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • An American Song
    humiliate the American Colonist Note the words They were not gentlemen they were pretenders to the gentile ranks Dandies They didn t ride horses they rode ponies They didn t wear the great curled plumes shaped like macaroni in their hats that the English nobility wore they wore feathers and called them macaroni This was purely a song meant to demean the Americans The American general was forced to surrender his sword to the English General During this time there was no greater insult then to surrender ones sword This was indeed a very low point for the Americans in the war Several years later when Washington captured the British forces under Cornwallis at Yorktown in Virginia and compelled him to surrender thus ending the revolution Washington demanded the same of the British General that they lay down their weapons and pass through the ranks of Americans that lined the road Cornwallis was so embarrassed by his defeat that he refused to meet Washington and surrender his sword Therefore he sent his second in command the very same General who had accepted the American surrender years before and who had imposed such humiliation upon the American forces This general refused to surrender his sword to Washington and instead presented it to the French commander that was present at the surrender The Frenchman refused to accept it and pointed to Washington indicating that it was he who should receive the sword for it was he Washington who had defeated the English The Englishman with great scorn approached Washington who immediately turned his head away and pointed to the American General who was forced to surrender at the fort years before The American who surrendered his sword was now about to receive the sword from the general he was forced to surrender

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/an_american_song.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • How It All Began
    but Dr Prescott escaped by leaving the road and making his way to Concord cross country The British continued marching toward Concord but the entire countryside was on the alert by this time and the militia was waiting to meet them The advance British troops commanded by Marine Major John Pitcairn arrived at Lexington at Dawn Lexington Militia Captain John Park knowing of Gage s unsuccessful attempt to seize arms and ammunition at Salem several months earlier had gathered about seventy of his men at the town common to face the British troops Pitcairn ordered his troops to surround and disarm the militiamen Parker responded by ordering his men to disperse Then a shot rang out It s unclear who fired first but the British answered with a volley of shots With eight killed and as many as ten wounded the militia scattered into the woods After the engagement the British discovered that Hancock and Adams had escaped so they pushed on toward Concord But Dr Prescott s warning preceded their arrival and while attempting to locate some cannons thought to be at a nearby farm the British ran into a group of militiamen at Concord s North Bridge The Americans had had more time to prepare for this encounter and when shots rang out this time the resulting conflict was a rout The British evacuated the bridge and moved to Concord center Realizing the precarious nature of his position Smith retreated towards Boston and the real battle began Militiamen from the neighboring area had moved toward Concord and when the British encountered the Americans they were outflanked The Americans fought differently from the British Flanking the retreating column the Americans hid behind trees and stone walls firing on the passing troops The British flanking maneuvers couldn t prevent ambushes

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/how_it_all_began.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • Presidential Comments
    all with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right let us strive on to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation s wounds to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations John F Kennedy We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution Let the word go forth from this time and place to friend and foe alike that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans born in this century tempered by war disciplined by a hard and bitter peace proud of our ancient heritage and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this Nation has always been committed and to which we are committed today at home and around the world 3 Let every nation know whether it wishes us well or ill that we shall pay any price bear any burden meet any hardship support any friend oppose any foe in order to assure the

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/presidential_comments.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • New Page 1
    Corinthian and Ironic They also had myths A myth is a female moth One myth says that mother of Achilles dunked him in the river stynx until he became intolerable Achilles is in the Iliad by Homer Homer also wrote the Odity in which Penelope was the last great hardship faced by Ulysses Actually Homer was not written by Homer but by another man named Homer Socrates was a famous Greek teacher who went around giving people advice They killed him Socrates was killed by an overdose of wedlock Life in ancient Greece reeked with joy In the Olympic games they ran around and tossed the java The victors won a coral wreath The government of angient Athens was democratic because the people took the law into their own hands There were no wars in Greece because the mountains kept people from seeing what their neighbors were doing When they fought the Persians the geeks were outnumbered because the Persians had more men Eventually the Ramons beat up all the geeks History calls them Romans because they never stayed in one place At Roman bankqwets people got drunk and wore garlics in their hair Julius Caesar extinquished himself on the battlefields of Gaul The Ides of March murdered him because they thought he was the king Nero was a cruel tyranny who tortured his subjects by playing the fiddle to them Then came the middle ages King Alfred conquered all the Dames in England King Arthur lived in the age of shivery King Harold mustard his troops at Hastings Then lost Joan of arch was cannonized by Bernard Shaw Victums of the black death died when large boobs grew under their arm pits Finally the Magna Carta said that no man could be hanged mice for the same crime In

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/essays.htm (2016-02-11)
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