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  • Sumerian Language and Words, Continued
    ESHARRA Home home in the faraway ERIDU Home home of going afar ERIDU Homes their homes DADMESUN Horn QANNU Horse SISU Hour two hours KASPU House E or BITUM House terrifying house EHUS House of BIT House of Anu EANNA House Causing Light EGISNUGAL or GISNU House of the ME s of ANU s Hero EMEURANNA House of the Lord Whose Return is Triumphant EENGURRA House Mountain EKUR or KUR or KURGAL great mount House of the Rising Sun EBABBAR House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In SHIIMTI House Which is Like a Mountain EKUR Hunter supreme hunter SHARUR Hurrah KARRA Idea ZIKRU IGIGI Those Who See and Observe Immediately HAMTA Impose EMEDU Impregnate ERU Imprison ESERU Incantation incantation word budding branch NUSKU Innocent UTEBBIBASSU Innumerable LA NIBI Inscribe to have inscribed SATARU Instead instead of KIMA Interruption BATLU Iron PARZILLU Ivory SINNU Joining heaven earth joining ANKIDA Joyfully HADIS Judge DAYYANUM Judges DAYYANI Judgeship DAYYANUTUM Kill DAKU King SARRUM King of SAR Kings of SARRU I Kingship SARRUTUM KINGU Great Emissary KISHAR Foremost of the Firmlands KISHARGAL Great Princess of Firm Ground Kiss NASAQU Know IDU Know one who knows MUDU Knowledge MUDUTU Lack to thirst SAMU Lady BELETI Land MATUM or KUR Land of Mas Located at Valley of EDIN Land of No Return ERSET LA TARI Land of the Lord of the GIR KIENGIR Land bright land Where the Ores are Made Final BADTIBIRA Land of Utmost Well Being SHURUPPAK Land of the Watchers SHIN AR or SUMER Law Case DINUM Lead to lead REDU Lead pot of lead Duggae Learn or to teach LAMADU Leave EZEBU or WASU Liar SARRU Lie Down UTULU or NAPARQUDU Life NAPISTUM or TI Life that which is life TIIT Life breath of life soul SHI Life heavenly life ZIANA Life vehicle of life GISHTIL Life of Earth and Water ZIKIA Light NURU or IMMARU Light they are deprived of light SUMMU NURA Lightning ZAMANI Lightning to strike with lightning BARAQU Lip SAPTU Live BALTU Live those who in heaven live TITAAN Liver KABATTU Living Ones BALTUTU Living Person BALTU Lock SIKKURU Look At evil eye NEKELMU Lord BELUM or EN Lord of BEL Lose to lose HALQU Lost HALQU Love ARAMMU Lower SAPLU Luxurious glittering ULMASH Made Out to have made out something EZEBU MAGAN Egypt Male ZIKAR MAMMI Mother of the Gods Man LU Man a man AWILUM Man of AWIL Mankind SALMAT QAQQADI Mankind civilized mankind NAMLUGALLU March war march ALLIK Message to send a person a message WU URU Messenger RAKBU Metal heavenly metal ANBAR Metal gleaming double metal ZABAR Metals the shine of metals ZAG Middle in the middle of INA QABAL Midsts in the midst of INA QEREB Mist IMBARU or IMDUGUD Mistress of Earth and Heaven DAMKIANNA Month WARHUM Moon NANNA Mother UMMUM Mound house of the holy mound EDUKU Mount to mount SAHATU Mountain SADU or SHADU or KUR Mountains HURSANU or HURSAG or GABRI Mountain of the Sky Chambers HURSAGMU

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  • THE LONG MARCH OF BOB SLAUGHTER Reporting the war was old
    newspaper and rose to composing room foreman He raised two sons coached Little League made furniture in his woodworking shop and mowed the grass And for 30 years except to other veterans he rarely mentioned the war His wife knew little of what he d been through His sons learned even less Occasionally he would wander from the newspaper s backshop into the newsroom and suggest a story about D Day He asked for one in 1979 the 35th anniversary but there was no story that year It was beginning to bug him that people knew so little about the invasion He d meet college educated people in their 30s who hadn t heard of it who didn t understand The D Company guys started getting together for reunions in 1982 Their talk sharpened Slaughter s war memories He began to collect other veterans accounts of D Day They d send him bits and pieces of their lives yellowed clippings tattered ribbons In 1984 a bunch of them went to Washington D C for a ceremony on D Day s 40th anniversary Former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger spoke and bands played It was the first major tribute to D Day Slaughter came home pleased He didn t expect there to ever be much more than that The march begins Bob Slaughter retired from the newspaper in 1987 One warm afternoon he sat on his patio on Kirkwood Drive Southwest with Steve Stinson a young co worker he d befriended at the newspaper Slaughter then 62 wanted to take his wife to Europe Stinson had been there Slaughter mentioned that well he had been to Europe before too He d been in the war He d been in D Day Stinson listened a while and said there ought to be a D Day memorial The idea got old soldier Slaughter on his feet again Yes there should be a memorial At least a statue He got to work Late in 1987 a newspaper columnist proposed a memorial and Slaughter Stinson and two veterans Col Norman Elmore and Lt Col Milton Aliff formed a committee With his 1 50 pasteboard briefcase jammed with D Day information Slaughter won the support of other Roanoke Valley men Circuit Judge Jack Coulter Navy Cmdr William Bagbey artist John Will Creasy former newspaper editorial writer Bob Fishburn and Gen William Rosson With each meeting Slaughter felt he had moved ahead The men formed a D Day foundation and were talking about where a memorial ought to be what it ought to look like The naysayers oddly enough were D Day veterans especially ones who still couldn t talk about it They told Slaughter to forget about a memorial To which he d respond You re going to let these guys down who re lying over there in graves They were our buddies An obsession In a corner of his bedroom Slaughter set up an IBM Selectric typewriter a retirement gift from the newspaper He began to write his memories of the war On the wall was his framed worn copy of the June 6 1944 orders of Gen Dwight D Eisenhower the D Day commander Slaughter had gotten his buddies to sign it and he carried it in his wallet through the war The inked signatures were fading and the lines where he folded the paper many times crisscrossed the page but Eisenhower s words were still there to spur him on You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade Slaughter would mentally put his uniform back on He d place himself in the landing craft and ride it all the way in to Omaha Beach He gave himself permission to remember everything to feel everything that he had packed away in his consciousness He was kicking in his sleep flinging his arms running jumping reliving it A flailing man of his size can be dangerous Margaret Slaughter moved to another room to sleep The newspaper began to pay attention Two days before D Day s 45th anniversary in 1989 The Roanoke Times World News published excerpts from Slaughter s memoirs I was in D Day he finally said Ups and downs Around that time the D Day foundation proposed that the memorial be built on Mill Mountain in Roanoke The mountain park s prominence and its closeness to the Blue Ridge Parkway seemed to make it the perfect place Slaughter was encouraged City government didn t go for the idea Some leaders thought construction would harm the mountain Others said the memorial clashed with other plans Roanoke seemed as disrespectful as it had when he came back from the war A lot of good Roanoke boys went over there and got themselves killed and in a few years they were just completely forgotten he said That just wasn t fair It hurt me and it made me mad By 1994 he was even more discouraged All the city offered was a speck of land near the Hotel Roanoke Maybe his committee should concede defeat But as in the ups and downs of D Day the axis soon shifted In the spring of 1994 a few weeks before the 50th anniversary of D Day Ken Ringle a writer for The Washington Post was looking for a D Day veteran to profile He read about Slaughter in a collection of D Day oral histories Ringle s profile on the front of the Post s Style section told the story of an ordinary working Joe with vivid and humble memories of one of the worst battles in history Other stories followed in Newsweek People on television The White House asked Slaughter to walk Omaha Beach with President Clinton on the anniversary It was Slaughter s proudest moment On the beach he remembered Clinton held on to him as he poured sand out of his shoes And as he described D Day to Clinton and pointed out where the troops landed Slaughter could hear the photographers off in

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  • Bob Slaughter
    try to keep afloat Some of the landing craft sank before they got in because of the rough sea In fact we picked up some of our buddies who had floundered eight or nine miles from shore and we had taken them on as extra cargo and some that we should have picked up or would have liked to have picked we left because we didn t have room We

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  • By 1943
    his Atlantic Wall Hitler said that his troops would annihilate those Americans He bet that his Hitler Youth trained to follow orders under all circumstances would maul the free thinking undisciplined children of the democracies He said the Americans were weak soft and spoiled and no match for his hard trained soldiers who were raised in accordance with his own totalitarian system of complete obedience and subservience The Troops landed at 0600 hours 6 th June 1944 The Liberation of Europe had commenced The Wall held back the British for about an hour the Canadians for about 20 minutes and the Americans at Utah for about two hours The Atlantic Wall was a joke That is everywhere but for the Americans assaulting Omaha As soon as the gates of the landing craft fell the Germans on the hill began firing and Americans began dying in wholesale numbers Yet on they charged Loading and firing back with a demoniacal fury said one man Men were shot and spun around like tops by the impact of the bullets Heads arms and backpacks flew into the clear air from the German shells that were landing everywhere on the beach The German defenders were pouring a terrible fire down upon the Americans We couldn t help but hit them with every shot said one German Soldiers began sliding and slipping on the muddy beach caused by the blood and insides of their fallen comrades Human body parts lay everywhere The incoming German shells destroyed entire units Men prayed out loud cried out loud and died on the beaches of a foreign county They fell like when snow lands on warm ground they simple were no more Yet through the smoke and bursting enemy shells through the screams of their wounded comrades through the confusion and indistinguishable orders of commanding officers through this universe of man made hell came the American infantry fighting viciously for every step forward and for every step closer to the Germans who held the high ground The Germans soon found out that this was a different kind of army This was an army out to make other men free This was an army that would not turn and run The Navy saw what was happening and some brave American naval commanders moved their ships so close to the shore that the bottoms scrapped along the ocean floor They turned their ships sideways parallel to the beach and ordered their own big guns to start firing back at the German batteries that were slaughtering the American infantry on the beach Several large naval guns fired off at once and their great shells blasted into the German defenses Some sailors manning the guns on the ships got into one on one duels with the German artillery and exchange after exchange ensued In his excitement one naval gunner started crying laughing and screaming back at the Germans tears flowing from his eyes all the while firing his gun at the beach until the

    Original URL path: http://history-world.org/june6th.htm (2016-02-11)
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  • Events Leading to the Japanese Attack of Pearl Harbor Hawaii
    most important to the success of this plan With that said one wonders how secure was the flow of information around the Imperial Naval Staff because on January 27 1941 Joseph C Grew the U S Ambassador to Japan wired Washington that he had learned information that Japan in the event of trouble with the U S was planning a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor No one in Washington believed the information if someone had believed this information the Pearl Harbor attack possibily could have been avoided While many thought that war was possible no one believed that the Japanese could surprise us Most senior American military experts believed that the Japanese would attack Manila in the Philippine Islands Manila s location threatened the sea lanes of communications as the Japanese military forces moved south Another thought to location of attack was toward the north into Russia because of the war in Europe between Germany and the Soviet Union February As the Japanese were conducting preliminary planing for the attack Americans were preparing to defend American property Admiral Husband E Kimmel Commander in Chief of the U S Fleet and Lieutenant General Walter C Short Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department prepared Hawaii for attack Defence of the islands was an Army responsibility though the Navy did play a major role in preparing to repel an attack Adm Kimmel planed on taking his fleet out of the harbor and confronting the enemy at sea With this in mind both officers communicated with their seniors in Washington attempting to obtain additional men and equipment to insure a proper defence of all military instillations on Oahu At this time war production of the U S was still limited resulting with the dispersal of material around the world trying to fill everyones needs Britain Russia the Philippines and Hawaii March Nagao Kita Honolulu s new Consul General arrives on Oahu with Takeo Yoshikawa a trained spy As the military of both countries prepared for possible war the planners needed information about the opponent The U S knew that Hawaii was full of Japanese intelligence officers but because of our constitutional rights very little could be done Untrained agents like Kohichi Seki the Honolulu consulate s treasurer traveled around the island noting all types of information about the movement of the fleet When the attack occurred the Japanese had a very clear picture of Pearl Harbor and where individual ships were moored April During the time period U S intelligence officers continued to monitor Japanese secret messages American scientists had developed a machine code named Magic which gave U S intelligence officers the ability to read Japanese secret message traffic Magic provided all types of high quality information but because of preconceived ideas in Washington some data was not followed up on and important pieces of the pre attack puzzle were missed Japanese consular traffic was also intercepted which provided additional intelligence While the U S had all the data needed to arrive at

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  • Photos of Pearl Harbor
    Before The Attack The USS Shaw The USS West Virginia Damage A View of the Ships Burning Pearl Harbor During The Attack The Arizona Hickman Field Arizona s Turret The

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  • A Day In The Life Of A Battle of Britain Pilot
    with the other flight that had gone out to take our place The rest that we had all looked forward to was short lived I was just about to go and see the old man when the telephone rang again there was a short silence then Everybody up scramble There had been hardly enough time to service the aircraft but we ran all the same fired up the Merlins and within seconds we were bouncing across the grass with throttles open and doing it all over again No Margin for Error Author The raid on London must be continuing as we were vectored to the same position we had been earlier Again I started to think tactics height gain the advantage of height and again ascended two thousand more than our directed height With South London below I cached a glimpse of a formation of enemy bombers as we turn southwest of London I decide to maneuver our section to engage a group of Dornier Do17s from the beam but at the last instant the Germans turn so that a co ordinate assault becomes impossible My plan has gone astray Villa Squadron Villa Squadron okay boys pick your target break break I instruct the men to break up and make individual attacks I took the leading Dornier I turned then closed fast I fire a four second burst before diving underneath and swinging around for a second attack from the other side Again I fired for four seconds The leading Dornier seems undamaged but suddenly the second bomber in the formation breaks away and falls into a dive I turn off and spot a single Messerschmitt Bf109 below and ahead I follow it through the thick smoke billowing over the Thames and finally catch up with it over the Estuary I fired for three seconds The 109 is hit and I close in to 50 yards and fired for the last time Pieces of the German fighter are torn away before it crashes into the sea I returned back towards London The scene below is devastating A huge cylinder of black smoke from burning warehouses near the docks billows steadily up into the clouds The docks and warehouses are ablaze as London s East End is hammered The sun glints on the wings of the German bombers as they turn followed by the flak Smaller planes dart in and out of the enemy formation and the German planes are scattered but there are so many that they seem impossible to stop I make contact with Horton and Chips we gain height where the air is a little clearer and more room to move in safety as the bombers are below us and with no sign of 109s A short conversation and I instruct them to go in again Horton picked a target and banked away and I lost sight of him as he went down Chips put his nose down and headed for a group of three Dorniers I follow him to the left and behind Villa break Villa break bandits two o clock I gathered that it would only be a matter of minutes before the 109s would be on us Chips is still diving down at the bombers He is ahead of me as he closes in on a straggling Dornier I continue to follow him down and saw him make a quarter attack on the German bomber Large pieces fly off the enemy machine then a wing crumples as it goes down spinning An instant later I see a Spitfire which I assume to be that of Chips spinning down with about a third of its wing broken off Has there been a collision The Spitfire spins wildly and he has no chance to bail out Another casualty of this wretched war After doing my best to forget for the time being what I saw I turned and attacked the bombers evaded more 109s I get a Dornier and a probable and damage a Messerschmitt but with ammunition exhausted and fuel tanks close to empty we land back at our airfield in ones and twos Pilots climb wearily out of their cockpits in grim silence carrying in their minds an unforgettable picture of the seemingly impregnable bulk of the German formations and of the terrible firestorm in London A Few of the Few Dennis Newton pp116 117 For the front line squadrons the daily routine varied little Dowding had implied that each squadron be allowed one days rest a week but this was not always possible A normal battle day with a day fighter squadron could begin as early as 3 30am and carried on until stand down at around 8 00pm Some flights or entire squadrons would be at readiness to take off within five minutes which in actual practice meant two or three minutes Sometimes there would be a section on standby with the pilots in their cockpits and able to be off the ground in a minute or so Breakfast or a sandwich lunch would probably be brought to the dispersal points around the airfield It was now just after midday we had flown two sorties today and that had taken the stuffing out of most of us we were glad of the rest no doubt other squadrons had been sent in to relieve us were over London and we were now enjoying the rest no matter how brief it may be In the intervals between flights we dozed on beds or chairs in the crew huts or in tents at satellite airfields or even on the grass Some read some played cards draughts or chess Tiredness inhibited conversation Periodically the telephone rang jerking us all into boggled eyed alertness More often than not the telephone orderly would call one of us to some innocuous administrative call and the tension of another anticipated order to combat receded That telephone played hell with our nerves I don t think any of us pilots ever again

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  • Battle of Britain statistics
    Britain itself AIRCRAFT STRENGTH May 1st 1940 STRENGTH June 30th 1940 Reconnaissance 670 569 Bf109 Fighters 1 369 1 107 Bf110 Fighter Bombers 367 357 Medium Heavy Bombers 1 758 1 380 Dive Bombers 417 428 In looking at the above table not only must we compare the strength under both dates and see that the strength had been drastically reduced by June 30th 1940 but we must also take into consideration that between the two dates shown additional new aircraft would have come out of the factories So if we take the Bf109 for instance the table shows a difference of 262 If 350 new Bf109s had come from the factories that in actual fact shows that 612 Bf109s were destroyed Unfortunately no details of replacement German aircraft were available at the time of writing so there would be an inaccuracy in the last example but you should get the general idea So it can be understood as to why the German Air Ministry was concerned with the number of losses that were occuring What made things worse when we look at the number of aircraft damaged in non combat operations In the May June period of 1940 and

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