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  • Museum | BEYONDbones
    or reuse a given coffin displays during this period of turmoil and material scarcity and seeks to contribute to the understanding of socioeconomics in ancient Egypt Equipped with high definition cameras and working in cooperation with museums and institutions in Europe and the United States Cooney takes her research team to investigate document and study coffin reuse in the Third Intermediate Period The data acquired will be compiled into a comprehensive database available to Egyptologists everywhere Posted in Distinguished Lectures Egyptology Special Events Tagged 66th annual ARCE conference 66th annual ARCE meeting american research center in egypt animal mummies animal mummy ARCE ARCE conference ARCE meeting Coffin distinguished lecture Dr Josef Wegner Dr Kara Cooney Dr Salima Ikram egypt egyptologist egyptology excavation Hall of Ancient Egypt history Houston mummy museum Leave a reply A Long Time Ago on the Other Side of the World Samurai culture inspires George Lucas s Jedi and Sith Published by Amy P on April 9 2015 at 10 17 am in Distinguished Lectures Reply Star Wars revealed the amazing creativity of George Lucas Star Wars characters seemed foreign even alien to American audiences Of course like all creative geniuses Lucas had his inspiration His characters resemble actual humans from a long time ago but from a galaxy not so far away Just on the other side of good old planet Earth a few hundred years ago samurai warriors were respected and revered To Star Wars fans it is no secret that George Lucas was inspired by Japanese culture when creating his Star Wars epics Japanese influences can be seen in costumes hairstyles make up as well as the weapons and swordsmanship Although the amazing visuals of the characters clearly have Japanese origins when you learn what to look for the most telling influence of samurai warriors on the Galactic Empire may be Bushido the way of the samurai The spirit of Bushido is reflected in the Jedi Code Lucas is known to have studied the works of filmmaker Akira Kurosawa When you see this film you will see the origins of the Jedi and Sith Haven t seen a Kurosawa film You are in luck You can view the iconic film Seven Samurai at HMNS on April 14 and see the force of the samurai that inspired Lucas Star Wars empire How did the code of the Samurai warrior translate to the Jedi Knights Need light shed on the transformation of samurai sabers into an energy blade How did the armory and arms of the Samurai influence that of the Galactic Empire This summer you can learn about the influences the samurai made to the Star Wars movie franchise in special evening tour of the Samurai The Way of the Warrior exhibit offered on June 18 July 16 and August 20 Space is limited so book your galactic samurai adventure now Film Screening Seven Samurai Tuesday April 14 6 30 p m One of the most thrilling movie epics of all time the newly restored

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/museum/ (2016-02-12)
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  • NASA | BEYONDbones
    and a BA in African and African American Studies from Stanford University She continued her studies at Cornell University where she received her doctorate degree in medicine A few years later she proceeded to volunteer for over two years with the Peace Corps in Western Africa where she taught health education and contributed to research concerning the Hepatitis B vaccination among others After all of her volunteer work Jemison applied to be part of the NASA Space Program and was one of 15 people selected out of 2000 to join the Space Program in 1987 She joined her first orbiting mission in 1992 with Endeavor While aboard Endeavor she worked with other astronauts on bone cell research along with other experiments and investigations Although her time in space was short she was able to claim the title of first female African American in space In May of 1993 Dr Jemison left NASA to teach at Dartmouth College and continue to educate future generations In addition to her space travels Dr Jemison has a list of accomplishments that would knock your socks off She can speak four languages wrote her own book called Find Where the Wind Goes was on the cover of JET Magazine hosted the World of Wonders TV show and was voted one of the 50 Most Beautiful People according to People Magazine If that s not enough she s also got a sense of humor She talks about her experiences in Brazil for the 20th anniversary of the Apollo missions and she comments Wow Y all need to be glad I didn t go to Brazil before NASA or I d still be there doing development work and the Samba on the beach Like I said impressive Space was not the first major accomplishment for Dr Mae Jemison and it certainly won t be her last She continues to expand interest in science education through her foundation The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence She created The Earth We Share international science camp for students as well as a program to encourage hands on science education through Teachers If you are inspired by women such as Dr Mae Jemison then you ll enjoy meeting some of the local ladies of STEM at GEMS this weekend Come to HMNS between 9 a m and 1 p m to learn more about science technology engineering and math We ll even have representatives from NASA Posted in STEM GEMS Tagged astronaut endeavor NASA orbit Science STEM teacher Leave a reply Are we there yet Dr John Kappelman discusses Africa and the human evolutionary journey at HMNS Published by Dirk on May 6 2014 at 1 53 pm in Anthropology Reply In the history of mankind there have been three major migrations two of these happened a long time ago and one of the one small step for man one giant leap for mankind type happened in our own lifetime About 1 8 million years ago hominids we call Homo erectus ventured outside Africa wandering into Europe and Asia Our own species evolved in East Africa around 200 000 years ago About 50 000 years ago Homo sapiens followed in Homo erectus footsteps with significant numbers leaving Africa Eventually they crossed Asia and made it all the way into the Americas Homo erectus model displayed at the Westfälisches Landesmuseum Herne Germany in 2007 Image from Wikimedia On July 20 1969 Homo sapiens marked another milestone with the first step on the Moon Today we have a permanent presence in space albeit it on a very limited scale We have come a long way indeed Long before Homo erectus left Africa other bipedal creatures roamed Africa Among these was Australopithecus afarensis a hominid first discovered in Ethiopia In 1974 Donald Johanson and his team uncovered a well preserved specimen who was nicknamed Lucy and shortly afterwards also Dinkenesh AL 288 1 Australopithecus afarensis Also known as Lucy or Dinkenesh Image by Viktor Deak Lucy and her species have been the subject of many scientific studies However when she traveled to the United States for the second time in 2007 the first time was in 1975 to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History she underwent a scientific procedure never before applied to her for 10 days she resided on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin where she underwent a high resolution CT scan The scanned data was handed over to the government of Ethiopia and Mamitu Yilma director of the National Museum in Addis Ababa The successful completion of Lucy s scan meant that the specimen is now safely archived in digital format one of the reasons behind the scanning A small but dedicated team participated in the scanning project in Austin Members of the scanning team included from left Ron Harvey conservator Lincolnville Maine Alemu Admassu curator National Museum Addis Ababa Ethiopia John Kappelman UT Austin and Richard Ketcham UT Austin The team used the ultra high resolution Xradia MicroXCT scanner background for some of the scans Dr John Kappelman has had a long standing relation with the Houston Museum of Natural Science He was one of many scientific advisors to the curator of anthropology when the exhibit featuring Lucy was prepared His own research into human evolution is the topic of an upcoming presentation at the museum To find out if we are there yet come listen to Dr Kappelman on Tuesday May 13 at 6 30 p m HMNS Distinguished Lecture The First Big Trip Are We There Yet Africa and the Human Journey John Kappelman Ph D Tuesday May 13 2014 6 30 p m Click here to purchase advance tickets This lecture is cosponsored by Archaeology Institute of America Houston Society as part of its 2013 2014 Innovations series Posted in Anthropology Tagged africa apollo mission australopithecus afarensis Dr John Kappelman early hominids evolution hominids Homo erectus Lucy NASA out of africa space travel Leave a reply The galaxy just got bigger Calling all future space

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/nasa/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Night Sky | BEYONDbones
    esq Saturn is the only planet visable to us at night this June Face south at dusk and you ll see Saturn near a star of similar brightness Spica in Virgo Saturn is significantly higher in the sky than Spica and a bit to its right as you face south The ringed planet is now well placed for evening viewing and remains in the evening sky until late September 2011 Mars and Jupiter are now higher in the pre dawn sky Jupiter set against a background of very dim stars dominates the eastern sky at dawn Mars is dimmer and much lower in the east northeast It has fully emerged from the sun s glare however and will brighten slightly each morning Venus does not rise until morning twilight Look for it very low in the east northeast as day breaks The Big Dipper is above the North Star with its handle pointing up From that handle you can arc to Arcturus and then speed on to Spica those stars are in the south at dusk Leo the Lion is high in the west at dusk Antares brightest star of Scorpius the Scorpion is in the southeast with the teapot of Sagittarius rising behind it The Summer Triangle has fully risen in the northeast The stars of summer are here Moon Phases in June 2011 New Moon June 1 4 02 p m 1st Quarter June 8 9 09 p m Full Moon June 15 3 12 p m Last Quarter June 23 6 48 a m Sunset photo credit K vanç Ni The full moon of June 15 passes through the Earth s shadow causing a total eclipse of the Moon Unfortunately we miss out on that one too as the eclipse occurs during our daylight hours Anyone in the Eastern Hemisphere though can observe a central and therefore especially long total eclipse of the moon At 12 17 p m on Tuesday June 21 the sun is directly overhead at the Tropic of Cancer the farthest point north where this is possible This makes the midday sun as high in our sky as possible and gives us more daylight than on any other day of the year This moment is therefore the summer solstice However the earliest sunrise for us is the morning of June 11 and the latest sunset is on June 30 Those of us who sleep through sunrise and witness sunset may get the impression that the days are lengthening all the way to the end of the month By popular demand our George Observatory will open to the public not only on Saturdays but also all Friday nights in June and July except July 8 The Discovery Dome our traveling planetarium will be set up each of these Fridays to show films throughout the evening Posted in Astronomy Tagged antares arcturus Astronomy big dipper constellations eclipse equinox houston night jupiter Leo the lion Mars night sky north star planets sagittarius saturn scorpius solar system

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/night-sky/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Orion | BEYONDbones
    Hunter takes center stage on winter evenings Surrounding Orion are the brilliant stars of winter Orion s belt points down to Sirius the Dog Star which outshines all other stars we ever see at night The Little Dog Star Procyon rises with Sirius and is level with Orion s shoulder as they swing towards the south To the upper left of Orion s shoulder is Gemini the Twins Moon Phases in January 2016 Last Quarter Jan 1 11 30 p m Jan 31 9 28 p m New Jan 9 7 31 p m 1st Quarter Jan 16 5 26 p m Full Jan 23 7 46 am At 4 49 pm on Saturday January 2 the Earth was as close to the Sun as it will get this year Thus we say that the Earth was at perihelion However Earth was only about 1 6 closer to the Sun than average on this date That s why being closer to the Sun at this time does little to warm us up The effect of Earth s tilt on its axis dominates the small effect of Earth s varying distance in causing the seasons Although the shortest day least daylight occurs on December 21 the latest sunrise occurs for us about January 10 That s because the Earth speeds up on its orbit as it approaches perihelion This acceleration shifts sunrise local noon and sunset slightly later each day for the first part of this month The effect is smaller than that of the Sun taking a slightly higher path across the sky which normally dominates in causing later sunsets and earlier sunrises But the Sun s apparent path varies very little near the solstice itself allowing the secondary effect of the Earth approaching the Sun to predominate until mid January Most people then will notice that both sunrise and sunset are now happening earlier than in December As we move farther from the solstice the effect of the Sun taking a slightly higher path each day again predominates On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear Skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy earth January jupiter Mars moon orion saturn solstice stars sun venus Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten Lunar Eclipse on April 4 Published by James on April 2 2015 at 12 22 pm in Astronomy Reply Mars remains in the west at dusk this month as it moves through Aries Mars continues to fade a little each night as Earth continues to leave it farther behind Later on this month Mars begins to be lost in the glare of the Sun Mercury enters the evening sky as Mars leaves it By April 30 Mars will be gone but Mercury will be low in the west northwest near the Pleiades star cluster Venus is in the west at dusk Look over the point of sunset for the brightest thing there Jupiter is now high in the sky almost overhead as soon as night falls Jupiter outshines all stars we ever see at night so it will be obvious when you look up at dusk Saturn is in the southwest at dawn Brilliant winter stars shift towards the west during April Dazzling Orion is high in the southwest at dusk His three starred belt is halfway between reddish Betelgeuse and bluish Rigel Orion s belt points right to Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull Above Orion are the twin stars Castor and Pollux marking the heads of Gemini the Twins Jupiter is among the Twins this month You can find Sirius the brightest star we ever see at night by drawing a line from Orion s belt towards south left as you face west Forming a triangle with Betelgeuse and Sirius is Procyon the Little Dog Star Joining the winter stars are stars of spring in the south and east Look for Leo the Lion almost overhead at dusk In the east extend the Big Dipper s handle to Arc to Arcturus and then speed on to Spica Moon Phases in April 2015 Full April 5 7 05 am Last Quarter April 11 10 44 pm New April 18 1 56 pm 1st Quarter April 25 5 55 pm The Full Moon of April 4 passes through the Earth s shadow causing a total lunar eclipse Unfortunately the Moon clips the edge of the Earth s shadow allowing for only 5 minutes of totality What s more for us the eclipse occurs near moonset and sunrise which are almost simultaneous when there is a lunar eclipse That puts the Moon low to the horizon during the eclipse only those with clear views all the way to the western horizon can get a good look It also means that totality falls during morning twilight Eclipse times Partial eclipse begins 5 15 am Totality 6 57 7 02 am Moonset still partially eclipsed 7 13 am On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy betelgeuse big dipper earth eclipse Houston jupiter leo lunar Mars mercury orion procyon saturn sirius skies spring star stars winter Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten The Stars of Spring are Rising Published by James on March 5 2015 at 7 00 am in Astronomy Reply Mars remains in the west at dusk this month as it moves through Pisces Mars continues to fade a little each night as Earth continues to leave it farther behind After this month Mars begins to be lost in the glare of the Sun Venus is in the west at dusk Venus overtook Mars on February 21 now watch Venus leave behind the much dimmer Mars throughout March Jupiter was

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/orion/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Photography | BEYONDbones
    all cameras can set up shop in our latest and greatest exhibits and get a crowd free glimpse of the goods This month we re lifting the veil off three major titans for your photographic pursuits the stunning new Hall of Ancient Egypt the intriguing Scenes from the Stone Age the Cave Paintings of Lascaux exhibition and the timeless Hall of the Americas where photography is traditionally prohibited until now In order to get the opportunity to snap those masterful exhibits we ask that you meet three simple requirements 1 Register for the Pixel Party Yup register It s totally free but we ve gotta know you re coming You can do that registration thing if you point your little mouse right here and click After you register you ll receive an email confirmation that your registration is good to go Oh and you might wanna take note of the deadline because there is one Registration must be received by 5 p m on Fri Feb 21 We won t accept registrations after that no matter how hard you beg or how many barrels of cupcakes you promise to bring Sorry Them s the breaks 2 Bring a camera Maybe that goes without saying since this is a photography party and all but hey we re saying it anyway This means that everyone in attendance must have a camera in hand We actually don t care what kind of camera smartphone fancy camera credit card sized camera and the like but whatever you ve got has to be capable of taking photos But this also means no 1 It means no family no friends and no one without a click click clicker in hand Just photographers Now if your loved ones take photos too that s another story So um psst Make em register 3 Have an active photo sharing profile on the Interwebs You know we wanna check out the spectacular photos you take of our exhibits Let s face it you make us look good And maybe we re a little vain too But we wanna see ourselves in the glow of your adoring gaze So indulge us To that end you must have an active Flickr Instagram 500px or other photo sharing account a dedicated Facebook Fan Page for your photography or an active photography portfolio online We have to make sure that you are who you say you are a photographer Because why show up to a picture party if you don t really like to take them That s it Capisce Doors will open at 5 30 p m and you can chill in the Grand Hall until the event begins at 6 p m We ll have kibbles for you on our front patio from The Hungry Lumberjack so bring cash and of course the chance of a lifetime to explore three fabulous exhibits after hours Think you can hang with some snap happy folks at the Museum Then register why dontcha Posted in

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/photography/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Planets | BEYONDbones
    This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus Lyra and Aquila Scorpius the Scorpion is in the south with the teapot of Sagittarius to his left Leo the Lion sets in the west From the Big Dipper s handle arc to Arcturus and speed on to Spica in the southwest Watch Mars close in on Saturn this month This month Mars is in the southwest at dusk this month Mars continues to fade a little each night as Earth continues to leave it farther behind Still Mars rivals the brightest stars we see at night Saturn is also in the southwest at dusk This month and next Mars approaches Saturn more and more Venus remains in the morning sky Look east at dawn for the brightest point of light there only the Sun and Moon outshine Venus Venus remains a morning star for almost all of 2014 Jupiter is behind the Sun and out of sight this month The Big Dipper is left of the North Star with its handle pointing up From that handle you can arc to Arcturus and then speed on to Spica those stars are in the west at dusk Leo the Lion is setting in the west at dusk Antares the brightest star of Scorpius the Scorpion is in the southeast with the teapot of Sagittarius rising behind it The Summer Triangle has fully risen in the northeast The stars of summer are here Moon Phases in July 2014 1st Quarter July 5 7 00 a m Full July 12 6 26 a m Last Quarter July 18 9 09 p m New July 26 5 42 p m At about 7 p m on Thursday July 3 Earth is as far from the Sun as it will get this year This is aphelion when Earth is 94 56 million miles from the Sun as opposed to the average distance of 93 million miles On January 4 Earth was at 91 44 million miles from the Sun that was perihelion closest approach to the Sun It turns out that this variation in the Earth Sun distance is too small to cause much seasonal change The tilt of Earth s axis dominates as it orbits the Sun That s why we swelter when farther from the Sun and shiver when we re closer Click here to see what s happening this month in the Burke Baker Planetarium On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged aphelion arcturus Astronomy burke baker planetarium james wooten July 2014 jupiter Leo the lion Mars planetarium planets saturn scorpius spica star chart stargazing stars summer triangle venus Leave a reply The galaxy just got bigger Calling all future space explorers to Family Space Day Published by Vincent on February 27 2014 at 1 55 pm in Astronomy Reply ATTENTION

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/planets/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Preserving Artifacts | BEYONDbones
    Objects Morganite Published by Joel on December 29 2009 at 11 11 am in Gems Minerals Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Beryl Variety Morganite White Queen Mine San Diego County California The White Queen mine is famous for beautiful crystals of pink beryl the gem variety morganite named after financier J P Morgan The pictured 7 9 cm crystal found in 1964 may well be the best ever found there It has good color no damage a glassy luster on the big hexagonal c face and interesting crystal form and it rests on a base of white albite crystals Peter Bancroft in his World s Finest Minerals and Crystals 1973 considers this specimen to be the world s finest example of pink beryl although fans of examples from Madagascar and Brazil might put up an argument Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org Posted in Gems Minerals Tagged 100 years 100 objects albite albite crystal beryl gems gems and minerals j p morgan minerals morganite pink beryl preserving artifacts preserving objects Leave a reply 100 Years 100 Objects Spadefoot Toad Published by David on December 28 2009 at 11 03 am in Paleontology Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from David Temple the museum s curator of paleontology He s chosen a

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/preserving-artifacts/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Preserving Objects | BEYONDbones
    Objects Morganite Published by Joel on December 29 2009 at 11 11 am in Gems Minerals Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Beryl Variety Morganite White Queen Mine San Diego County California The White Queen mine is famous for beautiful crystals of pink beryl the gem variety morganite named after financier J P Morgan The pictured 7 9 cm crystal found in 1964 may well be the best ever found there It has good color no damage a glassy luster on the big hexagonal c face and interesting crystal form and it rests on a base of white albite crystals Peter Bancroft in his World s Finest Minerals and Crystals 1973 considers this specimen to be the world s finest example of pink beryl although fans of examples from Madagascar and Brazil might put up an argument Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org Posted in Gems Minerals Tagged 100 years 100 objects albite albite crystal beryl gems gems and minerals j p morgan minerals morganite pink beryl preserving artifacts preserving objects Leave a reply 100 Years 100 Objects Spadefoot Toad Published by David on December 28 2009 at 11 03 am in Paleontology Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from David Temple the museum s curator of paleontology He s chosen a

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/preserving-objects/ (2016-02-12)
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