archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Conus Saurus | BEYONDbones
    will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Tina the museum s associate curator of malacology She has chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating shells and animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Conus saurus Garcia 2007 This scientifically important specimen is the holotype of its species In other words it is the specimen which provides the validation for the description of a separate species It is part of a huge study undertaken during the 1960 s in the Gulf of Mexico off the Texas and Louisiana coasts known as The Northwest Gulf Coast Survey which is housed here at HMNS This species was unknown until researchers recognized differences among groups of related cones and isolated and described it as a new species You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 years 100 objects conus saurus HMNS malacology preserving artifacts

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/100-years-100-objects-conus-saurus/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Au reservoir: A guide to new oil discoveries | BEYONDbones
    scientists go back to the seismic data to see how large the formation is They will drill more wells well well well to find more information on the formations such as where the oil comes into contact with the water They will also go back to the core sample to look at the characteristics of the rock the oil was found in Now that they have found the oil and looked at the characteristics of the reservoir how do they estimate the number of barrels of oil There are the proven reserves which is the amount of oil that the scientists are sure of getting out of the field using current methods The unproven reserves are the amount oil that the scientists think are there but cannot be reached yet photo credit tvol But how does that new field off the coast of Texas rate with the others in the world Well its not the biggest That award goes to the Ghawar field in Saudi Arabia It is estimated that the field has 71 billion barrels of oil Saudi Arabia claims to have over 200 billion barrels of oil in its fields while America before this new discovery claimed to have 21 billion barrels of oil still in its fields But what it really comes down to is production or how many barrels of oil does a field produce a day The Ghawar field produces 5 million barrels a day The world produces 80 million barrels a day America only produces 5 million barrels a day but uses 19 million barrels a day Most of which is used for gasoline America uses about 378 million gallons a day So the scientists use a variety of surveying methods to find oil fields and to determine their size The new find off

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/au-reservoir-a-guide-to-new-oil-discoveries/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Attention: Butterfly Enthusiasts! | BEYONDbones
    chaos of large school groups can be very intimidating to small children especially if they have never been here before I can t stress enough what a great time this is to visit so if you re working take a day off and take advantage of the amazing places that make up Houston s famous Museum district Right now we have some absolutely amazing butterflies flying and awesome insects in our Entomology Hall If you are wild about blue morphos who isn t you ll love these The Indian Leafwing Kallima paralekta is a rare treat for us from Southeast Asia Their camouflage is incredible They look exactly like a leaf while at rest but when they open their wings they display brilliant blue and orange They are one of my very favorites Another one we ve been getting lately is the one spotted prepona Archaeprepona demophon This butterfly from Central and South America is often mistaken for a blue morpho but upon closer inspection you can see that it s quite different Archaeprepona demophon photo credit wwarby Clear Wing Butterfly If you have very very good eyes you may be able to spot our tiny Greta oto also known as the clear wing or glass wing They are so small but very beautiful and elegant They also come from Central and South America and despite their size have a big personality As caterpillars they feed on poisonous plants They retain these toxins into adulthood making them distasteful to predators The males exhibit a type of behavior known as lekking This is a mating behavior where males gather on a daily basis in the same area and assume the same position within a circular arena Here they put on mating displays dances and even engage in fighting depending on the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/attention-butterfly-enthusiasts/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Eccentric Flint | BEYONDbones
    Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Dirk the museum s curator of anthropology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year The Pre Columbian Maya were excellent craftsmen capable of producing exquisite pieces like this eccentric piece of chert Some obsidian and chert tools were used as knives spear points etc this object had no direct utilitarian purpose Archaeologists and anthropologists like to classify items like these as ceremonial meaning they had a purpose we can only guess at Perhaps it was used as a symbol of political power hence the term scepter or manikin scepter Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P McGovern Hall of the Americas a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 6 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and tagged 100 objects 100 years Anthropolgy archaeology chert flakes HMNS Maya mayan obsidian preserving artifacts preserving objects by Dirk Bookmark the permalink About Dirk As curator of anthropology Dirk is responsible for the museum s artifact collection and is involved in its temporary and permanent anthropology exhibits Dirk is an expert in human cultures he curates the Museum s Hall of the Americas and specializes in native American cultures like the Aztec and Maya View all posts by Dirk 2 thoughts on 100 Years 100 Objects

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/100-years-100-objects-eccentric-flint/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Clothes Make the Warrior | BEYONDbones
    which is much like a bun the higher the knot was worn on the head the greater the number of kills made by that warrior An officer s hair would be braided flat Can you tell the warriors from the officers Chariot driver with cap and chin strap The headdress also speaks volumes about a soldier It tells you what military branch the individual belongs to and their status Warriors in the infantry wore a kerchief cap over their top knot hairstyle A cavalryman wore a close fitted cap with a chinstrap made from leather The charioteer wore a headdress made from metal and silk with a pointy top A general might sport an elaborate headdress in the form of a double tailed bird The pheasant tailed cap of the general speaks of his bravery and skill on the battlefield Can you identify the different kinds of warriors by what they wear on their head A Terra Cotta general When considering the clothing of a warrior you just must also check out his shoes the longer the toe on the shoe the higher the status of the individual Most shoes were made with animal hide stitched with flax thread Straw was used as padding How many different types of shoes can you identify in the exhibit No well dressed warrior would be seen without his armor right Well not exactly Whether you wore armor or not depended on your job Armor was made from plates of leather shellacked with lacquer to give them strength The size of the plate indicated your importance the smaller the plate the higher your rank I hope you come by to check out the Terra Cotta Warrior Exhibit before the opportunity passes you by and if you do I hope the warriors speak to you

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/the-clothes-make-the-warrior/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Photos: People of the Amazon | BEYONDbones
    How come photography is not allowed Steven on October 12 2009 at 9 31 am said The objects on display in the new Spirits Headhunters exhibition are part of the Museum s collection Most are made of organic materials which can be damaged by light from camera flashes which is why we do not allow photography and the lights in the exhibit are very dim The feather art in this collection is unique because the feathers are still so vibrant light exposure can wash out the colors over time David on October 12 2009 at 9 51 am said Thanks for the response Also how come special admission must be charged for the exhibit if the objects are part of the museum s permanent collection David on October 12 2009 at 9 57 am said In this link http www hmns org get involved hmns fast facts asp r 1 It states that the museum is 162 000 square feet Is that figure accurate it seems too small Steven on October 12 2009 at 11 51 am said In addition to the objects that are part of the museum s permanent collection the exhibition includes a lot of additional material all of the photographs by Cristina Mittermeier presented at the end of the exhibition which show how these objects are used in everyday life and many of the artifacts on display have been added for this exhibition in order to present a more complete view of these Amazon cultures David on October 13 2009 at 9 51 am said Generally how old are many of the objects in the exhibit I assume most aren t 10 years old correct Steven on October 15 2009 at 10 16 am said That figure is accurate it represents our public exhibition spaces and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/photos-people-of-the-amazon/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dimetrodon, Diplocaulus, and the Permian Treasure Trove | BEYONDbones
    more skull fragments appeared And more Then ribs Then vertebrae All so very tiny The largest vertebra was a mere seventeen millimeters The entire animal in life was no larger than a cat The ribs are quite peculiar very flat and uncurved Imagine this curious creature with a remarkably flat belly that clings advantageously to the bottom of a mud filled wallow or other small body of water The eruption of bone continued and is continuing The possibility of having our very first complete Diplocaulus or boomer head as we call them is a very distinct possibility I realized this animal did not yet have a name All our Permian pets receive names mind you After discussing the possibilities with our well seasoned digger Johnny The Mole Man Castillo we agreed that Meredith would be the name of our little amphibian After all our volunteer Meredith had been the sole prep tech for this jacket Johnny Castillo prepares Meredith for removal by adding a mini plaster jacket to the skeleton to keep each bone in place The next bonus appeared a week ago a beautiful small jaw full of teeth Twenty of them to be exact Upon first glance at this handsome little jaw I assumed I was seeing more of our dear Meredith though something seemed rather odd The teeth were not as needle like as they should have been to be Diplocaulus the jaw was not as round I noticed that one of the teeth was loose This was both good and bad Re attaching teeth to jaws is exceedingly complicated and when you have a jaw that is only six and a half centimeters long with itty bitty teeth We like to be perfectionists when it comes to prep and pre dino dentistry is quite difficult This loose tooth was my chance to attempt to i d its owner Under a microscope I stared at this magnificent crown in the palm of my hand My heart stopped Tiny serrations lined the outer edge This wasn t Diplocaulus Who had serrations at this time Dimetrodon did But was this Dimetrodon Extremely tightly packed teeth may offer an idea on how young Dimetrodons regrow their teeth I looked at the tiny jaw All the teeth were the same size Except for a missing tooth at the front of the jaw which would have been obviously larger but not by much My heart skipped a beat this time It was strikingly similar to a specimen possibly new to science discovered right here in our very own labs It was only just recently we discovered a jaw which may soon prove to be a new genus of Sphenacodont Sphenacodonts a family of Pelycosaurs which includes our favorite fin back Dimetrodon were the first animals to evolve a specialized set of teeth which include a large canine tooth as well as smaller cutting teeth Thus they are less like reptiles and more like mammals Our distant cousins these mammal like reptiles would

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/dimetrodon-diplocaulus-and-the-permian-treasure-trove/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Loriolaster mirabilis | BEYONDbones
    every few days This description is from David Temple the museum s curator of paleontology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating fossils in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Brittle Star Loriolaster mirabilis HMNS 450 Devonian Hunsruck Bundenbach Germany This starfish Loriolaster mirablis crept along the bottom of the Devonian sea around 390 million years ago much as modern forms still do today This fossil was discovered in a particular kind of fossil locality known as Lagerstatten a German word meaning resting place In a sense the organisms found preserved in this way hit the geological lottery a perfect storm that engulfed and entombed their ancient worlds creating conditions that record details not usually preserved the squishy bits soft tissue parts that would normally rot away without leaving a trace This is the perfect fossil graveyard The fossilization that occurs in these sites is not different from the process at other sites just more intense The burial is rapid exclusion of oxygen and the introduction of iron pyrite all combine to create the conditions for atypical and amazing preservation Of the dozen or so of these paleontological localities that are known the Museum has examples from many in the collection These examples are part of a collection the Museum has from the Hunsruck Slate found near Bundenbach Germany a Laggerstatten Devonian in age that has preserved more than 300 species Wander among prehistoric beasts in the Paleontology Hall a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 1 0 0 This

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/09/100-years-100-objects-loriolaster-mirabilis/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •