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  • Saturn | BEYONDbones
    Canopus is the second brightest star ever visible at night Thus it is clearly noticeable along the southern horizon on February and March evenings However you must be south of 37 degrees north to see Canopus rise This is the line that divides Utah Colorado and Kansas from Arizona New Mexico and Oklahoma The sky we see depends on our latitude as well as on the time of night and time of year From any given location in our hemisphere there is an area of the sky around the North Star in which stars never set circumpolar stars and an equivalent area around the South Celestial Pole in which stars never rise The closer you are to the pole the larger these areas are The closer you get to the equator the fewer circumpolar stars there are but there are also fewer stars that never rise for you At the equator no stars are either circumpolar or never visible all of them rise and set as Earth turns That s why down here in south Texas the Big Dipper sets for a while although it s always up for most Americans On the other hand Canopus too far south to rise for most Americans rises for us Moon Phases in February 2016 Last Quarter Jan 31 9 28 p m New Feb 8 8 39 a m First Quarter Feb 15 1 46 a m Full Feb 22 12 20 p m February is so short that last quarter Moons occur on Jan 31 and March 1 but not in February The New Moon of Feb 8 is the second New Moon after the winter solstice Accordingly it marks Chinese New Year Welcome to the Year of the Monkey Monday Feb 29 is leap day This day exists because our normal year of 365 days is too short The true length of one Earth orbit around the Sun is 365 days and almost 6 hours No one wants to begin a year in the middle of a day however Therefore we let the error add up over four years until it becomes 24 hours or one whole day then add that day back to the calendar Thus February 29 occurs every four years Almost 6 hours Well alright the difference between our orbit and our year is actually 5 hours 49 minutes and 16 seconds That makes our system a very slight overcorrection To prevent that from adding up we ll skip leap day in 2100 2200 and 2300 On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear Skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy big dipper george observatory jupiter leap year Mars mercury moon orion phases Pleiades saturn sirius taurus venus Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten Four Planets are Visible Published by James on January 4 2016 at 2 02 pm in Astronomy Reply Venus is in the southeast at dawn approaching Saturn Venus passes Saturn the morning of January 9 the two planets are less than one tenth of one degree apart They re easy to tell apart as Venus outshines all the stars we see at night and is almost 100 times brighter than Saturn Mars is now in the south at dawn Much dimmer than Venus now Mars is getting a little brighter each day until its opposition next spring Jupiter now dominates the southwestern sky at dawn As Jupiter approaches its opposition on march 8 you can also begin looking for it in late evening By January 31 for example Jupiter rises by 9 00 and will have cleared most horizon obstacles by 9 30 or 10 In January the Big Dipper is only partly risen at dusk As the Big Dipper rises though Cassiopeia remains high This is a pattern of five stars in a distinct W or M shape which lies directly across the North Star from the Big Dipper Look for Cassiopeia high in the north on fall and winter evenings Watch for the Great Square of Pegasus in the west at dusk Taurus the Bull is high in the south Look for the Pleiades star cluster above reddish Aldebaran Dazzling Orion the Hunter takes center stage on winter evenings Surrounding Orion are the brilliant stars of winter Orion s belt points down to Sirius the Dog Star which outshines all other stars we ever see at night The Little Dog Star Procyon rises with Sirius and is level with Orion s shoulder as they swing towards the south To the upper left of Orion s shoulder is Gemini the Twins Moon Phases in January 2016 Last Quarter Jan 1 11 30 p m Jan 31 9 28 p m New Jan 9 7 31 p m 1st Quarter Jan 16 5 26 p m Full Jan 23 7 46 am At 4 49 pm on Saturday January 2 the Earth was as close to the Sun as it will get this year Thus we say that the Earth was at perihelion However Earth was only about 1 6 closer to the Sun than average on this date That s why being closer to the Sun at this time does little to warm us up The effect of Earth s tilt on its axis dominates the small effect of Earth s varying distance in causing the seasons Although the shortest day least daylight occurs on December 21 the latest sunrise occurs for us about January 10 That s because the Earth speeds up on its orbit as it approaches perihelion This acceleration shifts sunrise local noon and sunset slightly later each day for the first part of this month The effect is smaller than that of the Sun taking a slightly higher path across the sky which normally dominates in causing later sunsets and earlier sunrises But the Sun s apparent path varies very

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/saturn/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Museum | BEYONDbones
    possibly be a connection and when associate curator for Amazonia Adam Mekler was here to install the Spirits Headhunters exhibition I asked him Sure enough it turns out that Moreira had worked with Mekler many years ago when parts of this collection were first on display Pretty amazing coincidence to be sure but I had to find out if there was any merit to the theory that one had influenced the other This is a science museum after all Here s what Ernesto had to say I can tell you right away Adam s pieces did not have an immediate direct impact on my work That said I have noticed a pattern in the way my brain works in regards to creativity When I was a teenager I looked at Japanese prints and architecture then in my early twenties I made a collection of one of a kind pieces called little people One time during a solo Gallery show the entire collection sold out The gallery owner told me it was sold to mainly Asian customers Sometime later I realized how Japanese my pieces actually were in their geometry and their compositional balance Most recently during the making of the museum Gem Vault pieces I began to adorn the settings with filigree but not just the normal filigree a more architectural version This time it did not take me long to figure out that once again I was translating many of the images in my head into my jewelry designs since I had spent many years sketching and photographing much of the ornamental ironwork on windows doors and street lights so prevalent in European cities something I still do So it seems I work best absorbing and letting be then somehow sometime the subject matter reappears in my work I worked with Adam Mekler and his incredible Amazonian collection during many years and for months at a time I would handle these amazing works absorbing as usual I doubt that such resemblance between the indigenous works and my own are purely coincidental yet I cannot claim an intentional link emphasis mine So not an intentional connection but I was pleased to discover such a link between ornamentation designed by these two very different artists and cultures It s fascinating to see how artists are inspired and how very different cultures can influence one another sometimes in seemingly random but very delightful ways It inspires me to take a closer look at everything around me in the museum but also out in the world Part of the joy in seeing real artifacts up close is having the opportunity to examine them for these little details that allow you to really experience the object first hand So how about you what little things have you noticed about the world The Lester and Sue Smith Gem Vault is a permanent exhibition at HMNS but you only have a few more weeks to see Spirits Headhunters before the exhibition moves on Don t miss it Before you come you can learn more about these fascinating cultures in a preview video interview with curator Adam Mekler below Can t see the video Watch it here Posted in Anthropology Tagged adam mekler amazon art amazon culture amazon tribe art and science art in science coincidence connection cooperation cultural influence cultural myths curator design design and science Ernesto Moreira exhibit exhibition exhibitions feather art Gem vault jewelry ka apor lester and sure smith gem vault myth one culture influencing another science design science museum spirits and headhunters tukaniwar Leave a reply Building an exhibit The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story Published by Donna on December 11 2008 at 3 09 pm in Anthropology 4 Ossuary used in Jewish funeral practices 1st century B C E On display in The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story starting tomorrow Registrars have many duties and wear many hats but one of my favorite registration duties is condition reporting Which is exactly what it sounds like I report what the condition is of an object Last week I had the privilege of working with the staff from the Hebrew University on the installation of our new exhibit The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story As each crate was opened and its artifacts unpacked HMNS Collections staff worked along side of the Hebrew University staff checking every detail of the artifacts to assure they had survived the long journey from Jerusalem intact and unchanged So I ve really been up close and personal with a lot of antiquities lately Ossuaries are even cooler when you can see the chisel marks Once we agreed that all was good it was time for the objects to be moved into the cases for the duration of the exhibit The movement and positioning of high value artifacts that are fragile or delicate or heavy or any combination of the three is a tricky thing always left to professionals And that s what I really want to tell you about the guys Every museum has them formally called exhibition preparators more commonly and affectionately known as the exhibit guys You know that expression jack of all trades master of none Yeah that doesn t apply to our guys If the exhibit designer and the curator want something to look just so it s the guys that make it happen They can build temporary walls and exhibit cases paint em any color hang signage labels artwork and wire up the electronic stuff too They pretty much do it all and do it well I ve been working with and watching them for years through many many exhibit installations but the best is watching them handle the objects These are bottles plates amphoriskos beakers modiolus measuring cup and unguentarium created during the 1st century CE On display in The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story starting tomorrow For The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story all the guys moved large heavy crates right where we needed them in

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/science-museum/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Stargazing | BEYONDbones
    you can arc to Arcturus and then speed on to Spica those stars are in the west at dusk Leo the Lion is setting in the west at dusk Antares the brightest star of Scorpius the Scorpion is in the southeast with the teapot of Sagittarius rising behind it The Summer Triangle has fully risen in the northeast The stars of summer are here Moon Phases in July 2014 1st Quarter July 5 7 00 a m Full July 12 6 26 a m Last Quarter July 18 9 09 p m New July 26 5 42 p m At about 7 p m on Thursday July 3 Earth is as far from the Sun as it will get this year This is aphelion when Earth is 94 56 million miles from the Sun as opposed to the average distance of 93 million miles On January 4 Earth was at 91 44 million miles from the Sun that was perihelion closest approach to the Sun It turns out that this variation in the Earth Sun distance is too small to cause much seasonal change The tilt of Earth s axis dominates as it orbits the Sun That s why we swelter when farther from the Sun and shiver when we re closer Click here to see what s happening this month in the Burke Baker Planetarium On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged aphelion arcturus Astronomy burke baker planetarium james wooten July 2014 jupiter Leo the lion Mars planetarium planets saturn scorpius spica star chart stargazing stars summer triangle venus Leave a reply A different kind of New Year s resolution So you want to be an amateur astronomer Published by Vincent on January 8 2014 at 2 24 pm in Astronomy Reply So you want to be an amateur astronomer Well there s never been a better time to explore the heavens from right here on Earth Enter the telescope Telescopes have been around for quite some time Invented in 1608 in the Netherlands the first major discoveries came from Galileo Galilei using an instrument he built and refined himself So even from the beginning space study and exploration had deep roots in the uninitiated who wanted to learn more about the brilliance of the night sky Now lucky for you telescopes have become relatively easy to acquire so there s no need to build your own unless of course that s your jam in which case you may want to check out the resources here here and here They re available at many big box stores and of course online And I d be willing to bet that many of you received one as gift over the holidays So now you have a telescope It s been sitting in the box for two weeks What s next It just so happens that we re offering telescope classes at the George Observatory on Sat Jan 11 Here an expert can help you set up your scope polar align it and make sure you re ready to start stargazing like never before click here for more information about our telescope classes The other key to making your telescoping adventures a success is knowing what to look for Once again you re in luck Thanks to the glories of the Internet you can find a multitude of resources to help Here are some of my favorites Star Chart Available for Apple and Android devices this incredibly user friendly app allows you to find and learn about constellations planets galaxies right on your smart phone before taking aim with your telescope Astronomy com Complete with a 2014 Sky Guide weekly podcasts friendly tutorials and more this site and magazine can definitely help you learn your way around the night sky Reddit Why not make your hobby a social outlet as well Connect with other amateur astronomers in your area for tips social gatherings interesting news and photos And for those ambitious enough to want to explore astrophotography there are resources for you here as well BEYONDbones the HMNS Blog One awesome part about the night sky is that it s always changing from season to season Keep up with what to look for in the sky with monthly blog posts from James Wooten our Planetarium Astronomer Last but not least you can often get updates and interesting information on NPR The Huffington Post and Wiki How Now you ve got all the tools to start exploring the cosmos Happy stargazing And don t forget to check out the resources at your fingertips at the George Observatory Posted in Astronomy Tagged amateur astronomy Astronomy astrophotography george observatory star chart stargazing stars telescope telescope class The George Observatory Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten Comet ISON Winter Solstice the Geminid meteor shower Published by James on December 4 2013 at 12 01 pm in Astronomy Reply This is it The final stargazing report of 2013 So let s get to it shall we Venus remains in the west at dusk for one more month It outshines everything but the Sun and Moon so you can begin observing it during deep twilight Shortly after the new year begins Venus shifts from the evening to the morning sky Jupiter will be up literally all night long early next month In December 2013 then it is not up at dusk but rises during the evening Now you can see it rise in the northeast at about 8 p m just as Venus sets By New Year s Eve Jupiter rises by 5 50 p m during twilight Mars remains in the morning sky It continues to brighten a bit in the south at dawn Saturn has reappeared in the pre dawn sky Face southeast right before sunup to see it In December

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/stargazing/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Stars | BEYONDbones
    Gemini the Twins Moon Phases in January 2016 Last Quarter Jan 1 11 30 p m Jan 31 9 28 p m New Jan 9 7 31 p m 1st Quarter Jan 16 5 26 p m Full Jan 23 7 46 am At 4 49 pm on Saturday January 2 the Earth was as close to the Sun as it will get this year Thus we say that the Earth was at perihelion However Earth was only about 1 6 closer to the Sun than average on this date That s why being closer to the Sun at this time does little to warm us up The effect of Earth s tilt on its axis dominates the small effect of Earth s varying distance in causing the seasons Although the shortest day least daylight occurs on December 21 the latest sunrise occurs for us about January 10 That s because the Earth speeds up on its orbit as it approaches perihelion This acceleration shifts sunrise local noon and sunset slightly later each day for the first part of this month The effect is smaller than that of the Sun taking a slightly higher path across the sky which normally dominates in causing later sunsets and earlier sunrises But the Sun s apparent path varies very little near the solstice itself allowing the secondary effect of the Earth approaching the Sun to predominate until mid January Most people then will notice that both sunrise and sunset are now happening earlier than in December As we move farther from the solstice the effect of the Sun taking a slightly higher path each day again predominates On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear Skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy earth January jupiter Mars moon orion saturn solstice stars sun venus Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten Southern sky brings beasts and gods of water in November Published by James on November 4 2015 at 10 58 am in Astronomy Reply Saturn sets in twilight for the first week of November and is lost in the sun s glare the rest of the month Venus Mars and Jupiter are still close together in the morning sky this month Right now Venus is close to Mars with Jupiter above them Venus and Mars are 0 68 degrees apart the morning of Nov 3 Venus is brighter than Jupiter and both outshine all stars we ever see at night so they re easy to find even in twilight Mars is much much dimmer than those two The moon is near Jupiter on Nov 6 and near Venus on Nov 7 During this month watch as Venus pulls away from Mars and both pull away from Jupiter Autumn represents a sort of intermission in the sky with bright summer stars setting at dusk while bright winter patterns such as Orion won t rise until later Orion is up by about 10 p m now and about 9 p m mid month The Summer Triangle is in the west Meanwhile the Great Square of Pegasus is almost overhead The stars in the southern sky are much dimmer than those overhead and in the west because when you face south at dusk in November you face out of the Milky Way plane The plane of our Galaxy follows a path from the Summer Triangle in the west through Cassiopeia in the north and over to the northeastern horizon Constellations in the November southern sky represent beasts and gods related to water indicating that they are part of the Celestial Sea Examples are Aquarius the Water Bearer and Pisces the Fish Even Capricornus the Goat has a fish tail because he s originally Ea Babylonian god of the waters Below Aquarius is Fomalhaut marking the mouth of the Southern Fish Ancient Mesopotamians imagined that the Persian Gulf extended upwards into the sky joining this sea of dim stars Moon Phases in November 2015 Last Quarter Nov 3 6 24 a m New Nov 11 11 47 a m First Quarter Nov 19 12 27 a m Full Nov 25 4 44 p m On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear Skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy burke baker planetarium constellations george observatory great square of pegasus james wooten jupiter Mars milky way saturn stars summer triangle venus Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten The Stars of Summer are Here Published by James on July 1 2015 at 3 45 pm in Astronomy Reply The Summer Triangle is high in the east This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus Lyra and Aquila Scorpius the Scorpion is in the south with the teapot of Sagittarius to his left Leo the Lion sets in the west From the Big Dipper s handle arc to Arcturus and speed on to Spica in the southwest Venus now moves away from Jupiter as they both gradually become lost in the Sun s glare This is the last month to observe the two brightest planets in the western evening sky On June 30 Venus overtook Jupiter This month watch Venus shift to the left of Jupiter each evening at dusk Meanwhile both planets appear lower and lower to the horizon each night until they are both lost in the Sun s glare by the end of the month At dusk look over the point of sunset for the brightest objects there Venus and Jupiter outshine everything but the Sun and the Moon Saturn is now in the southern sky at dusk Although it is not as brilliant as Venus or Jupiter it outshines the stars around it so it s also easy to see Mars

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/stars/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Sun | BEYONDbones
    Leave a reply TGIS The Summer Solstice is cause to celebrate Published by Caroline on June 21 2013 at 3 57 pm in Astronomy Reply It s been a long week and we know just what we need to kick back lots and lots of daylight So if today feels like it s been a long day that s because it has been In fact it s been the longest day of the year The sun appears farthest in the north today making today the Summer Solstice TGIS amirite For ancient Egyptians the Summer Solstice marked the beginning of the Nile s great flood season During the Pharaonic Period the Summer Solstice also coincided with the first appearance of Sirius the dog star which was also recognized as the beginning of the Egyptian New Year It was a time of major celebration in Egypt and people were given small faience water flasks inscribed with a hieroglyphic text that read Happy New Year We ll keep our Gregorian NYE but we don t need much reason to celebrate the weekend Happy Solstice Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy longest day of the year summer solstice sun Leave a reply Reporting from Down Under It s a solar eclipse shark attack in Australia Published by Carolyn S on November 15 2012 at 2 27 pm in Astronomy 2 I had never realized before that a photograph of a partial solar eclipse behind lots of colorful clouds at sunrise looks so much like a shark attack Especially if you re watching it over the Pacific Ocean with about 40 000 other people in Cairns Australia See the fin In my nine eclipse expeditions I have never seen these unique atmospheric conditions before Traditional knowledge suggests it s best if your solar eclipse view is cloudless with the sun s corona surrounding the moon s black disk at totality But if clouds spoil that view I discovered that dramatic images can hide in the cloud decks especially if the clouds are thick enough to filter the sun s light effective neutral density of four or greater and allow a camera to capture images without a solar filter Safety note We kept solar filters ready at a moment s notice if conditions improved We also viewed only through the LED display of the digital camera not through the viewfinder The museum s solar eclipse travelers had a front row seat from the balcony of their rooms on the 11th floor of our Australia hotel Boats had anchored in the harbor below us and eclipse watchers camped on the boardwalk by the water The event became a dynamic interplay of clouds and the partially eclipsed sun Sunrise began with decks of clouds drifting between the sun and us We aimed cameras mounted on telescopes to the place where we knew the sun would appear when the clouds parted The view from out hotel balcony at 6 a m when the sun was just clearing the peninsula s

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/sun/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Venus | BEYONDbones
    Canopus is the second brightest star ever visible at night Thus it is clearly noticeable along the southern horizon on February and March evenings However you must be south of 37 degrees north to see Canopus rise This is the line that divides Utah Colorado and Kansas from Arizona New Mexico and Oklahoma The sky we see depends on our latitude as well as on the time of night and time of year From any given location in our hemisphere there is an area of the sky around the North Star in which stars never set circumpolar stars and an equivalent area around the South Celestial Pole in which stars never rise The closer you are to the pole the larger these areas are The closer you get to the equator the fewer circumpolar stars there are but there are also fewer stars that never rise for you At the equator no stars are either circumpolar or never visible all of them rise and set as Earth turns That s why down here in south Texas the Big Dipper sets for a while although it s always up for most Americans On the other hand Canopus too far south to rise for most Americans rises for us Moon Phases in February 2016 Last Quarter Jan 31 9 28 p m New Feb 8 8 39 a m First Quarter Feb 15 1 46 a m Full Feb 22 12 20 p m February is so short that last quarter Moons occur on Jan 31 and March 1 but not in February The New Moon of Feb 8 is the second New Moon after the winter solstice Accordingly it marks Chinese New Year Welcome to the Year of the Monkey Monday Feb 29 is leap day This day exists because our normal year of 365 days is too short The true length of one Earth orbit around the Sun is 365 days and almost 6 hours No one wants to begin a year in the middle of a day however Therefore we let the error add up over four years until it becomes 24 hours or one whole day then add that day back to the calendar Thus February 29 occurs every four years Almost 6 hours Well alright the difference between our orbit and our year is actually 5 hours 49 minutes and 16 seconds That makes our system a very slight overcorrection To prevent that from adding up we ll skip leap day in 2100 2200 and 2300 On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer If you re there listen for my announcement Clear Skies Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy big dipper george observatory jupiter leap year Mars mercury moon orion phases Pleiades saturn sirius taurus venus Leave a reply Seeing Stars with James Wooten Four Planets are Visible Published by James on January 4 2016 at 2 02 pm in Astronomy Reply Venus is in the southeast at dawn approaching Saturn Venus passes Saturn the morning of January 9 the two planets are less than one tenth of one degree apart They re easy to tell apart as Venus outshines all the stars we see at night and is almost 100 times brighter than Saturn Mars is now in the south at dawn Much dimmer than Venus now Mars is getting a little brighter each day until its opposition next spring Jupiter now dominates the southwestern sky at dawn As Jupiter approaches its opposition on march 8 you can also begin looking for it in late evening By January 31 for example Jupiter rises by 9 00 and will have cleared most horizon obstacles by 9 30 or 10 In January the Big Dipper is only partly risen at dusk As the Big Dipper rises though Cassiopeia remains high This is a pattern of five stars in a distinct W or M shape which lies directly across the North Star from the Big Dipper Look for Cassiopeia high in the north on fall and winter evenings Watch for the Great Square of Pegasus in the west at dusk Taurus the Bull is high in the south Look for the Pleiades star cluster above reddish Aldebaran Dazzling Orion the Hunter takes center stage on winter evenings Surrounding Orion are the brilliant stars of winter Orion s belt points down to Sirius the Dog Star which outshines all other stars we ever see at night The Little Dog Star Procyon rises with Sirius and is level with Orion s shoulder as they swing towards the south To the upper left of Orion s shoulder is Gemini the Twins Moon Phases in January 2016 Last Quarter Jan 1 11 30 p m Jan 31 9 28 p m New Jan 9 7 31 p m 1st Quarter Jan 16 5 26 p m Full Jan 23 7 46 am At 4 49 pm on Saturday January 2 the Earth was as close to the Sun as it will get this year Thus we say that the Earth was at perihelion However Earth was only about 1 6 closer to the Sun than average on this date That s why being closer to the Sun at this time does little to warm us up The effect of Earth s tilt on its axis dominates the small effect of Earth s varying distance in causing the seasons Although the shortest day least daylight occurs on December 21 the latest sunrise occurs for us about January 10 That s because the Earth speeds up on its orbit as it approaches perihelion This acceleration shifts sunrise local noon and sunset slightly later each day for the first part of this month The effect is smaller than that of the Sun taking a slightly higher path across the sky which normally dominates in causing later sunsets and earlier sunrises But the Sun s apparent path varies very

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/venus/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Zoology | BEYONDbones
    m proud to introduce to you four new species of African house bats Scotophilus Study skin of Scotophilus andrewreborii holotype Study cranium and mandible of Scotophilus andrewreborii holotype Scotophilus andrewreborii Andrew Rebori s House Bat It is our honor to name this species for Andrew N Rebori 1948 2011 Rebori unknowingly touched lives and inspired many individuals including many museum professionals He always maintained a keen interest in animals especially bats which exemplified his spirit and attitude toward life Take flight every new day Type locality Kenya Rift Valley Province Nakuru District 12 km S 4 km E Nakuru 0 24 S 36 07 E Diagnosis Scotophilus andrewreborii is distinguished from S dinganii from Natal by a combination of external and craniodental features S andrewreborii averages slightly larger in body size for most characters Additionally the dorsal pelage in S andrewreborii is more reddish than the browner dorsal fur of S dinganii and the ventral pelage in S andrewreborii is orange versus a much darker grey in S dinganii Cranial measurements in S andrewreborii are smaller with non overlapping measurements for braincase breadth for males and shorter mean skull length 18 9 in S andrewreborii vs 19 6 mm for S dinganii narrower zygomatic shorter braincase height narrower interorbital width 4 4 vs 4 8 mm decreased breadth across upper molars and decreased breadth across upper canines for females Study skin of Scotophilus livingstonii holotype Study cranium and mandible of Scotophilus livingstonii holotype Scotophilus livingstonii Livingstone s House Bat It is our honor to name this species for the late David Livingstone 1813 1873 At a time when most of Africa was barely known compared to today Livingstone a young Scot of humble means explored central Africa Between 1841 and his death in 1873 Livingstone made several expeditions into the interior of the continent mapping uncharted lands and searching for navigable waterways Type locality Kenya Western Province Kakamega District Ikuywa River Bridge 6 5 km S 19 km E Kakamega 0 13 N 34 55 E Diagnosis Scotophilus livingstonii is distinguished from S dinganii from Natal by a combination of external and craniodental features S livingstonii averages larger overall in body size Additionally the dorsal pelage in S livingstonii is more reddish mahogany than the browner dorsal fur of S dinganii and the ventral abdominal pelage in S livingstonii is light buff vs a much darker grey in S dinganii Scotophilus livingstonii is also distinguished from S dinganii from Natal by cranio dental measurements Male S livingstonii have a shorter mean skull length and females have a longer mean mandibular length Study skin of Scotophilus ejetai holotype Study cranium and mandible of Scotophilus ejetai holotype Scotophilus ejetai Ejeta s House Bat This species is named in honor of Dr Gebisa Ejeta Distinguished Professor of Plant Breeding Genetics and International Agriculture at Purdue University He was born and raised in the village of Wollonkomi in west central Ethiopia Dr Ejeta is a plant breeder and geneticist who received the 2009 World Food Prize for his research and development of improved sorghum hybrids resistant to drought and Striga weed The results of his work have dramatically enhanced the food supply of hundreds of millions of people in sub Saharan Africa Type locality Ethiopia Orimaya Region Dogy River Bridge 8 21 43 N 35 53 02 E Collected at 1390 m above sea level Diagnosis Scotophilus ejetai is distinguished from S dinganii from Natal by a combination of external and craniodental features S ejetai averages smaller overall in body size with females presenting non overlapping forearm length Additionally the ventral pelage in S ejetai has an orange hue whereas the ventral fur is buff with a greyish abdomen in S dinganii Cranial measurements in S ejetai are smaller with non overlapping measurements for skull length zygomatic breadth and braincase breadth for males and zygomatic breadth and braincase breadth for females Study skin of Scotophilus trujilloi holotype Study cranium and mandible of Scotophilus trujilloi holotype Scotophilus trujilloi Trujillo s House Bat It is our honor to name this species for Dr Robert Trujillo b 1975 whose ground breaking doctoral dissertation on the molecular systematics of Scotophilus paved the way for the description of the four cryptic species described here Dr Trujillo s dedication to science and environmental stewardship are reflected in his outstanding career in the US Forest Service Type locality Kenya Coastal Province Kwale District Moana Marine Station 1 km S 2 km E Ukunda 4 18 S 39 35 E Diagnosis Scotophilus trujilloi is distinguished from S viridis from Mozambique Island by a combination of external and craniodental features S trujilloi averages larger in body size and shorter in forearm length with females presenting non overlapping head body and forearm lengths Additionally the dorsal pelage in S trujilloi is mahogany whereas the dorsal fur is brown in S viridis The ventral pelage in S trujilloi is orange with a greyish abdomen whereas the ventral fur is grayish brown grizzled whitish abdominally in S viridis Cranial measurements in S trujilloi differ from S viridis with shorter mean braincase height in males and females as well as non overlapping mandibular length in females Posted in Zoology Tagged African house bats Andrew Rebori Biogeography Clade conservation cytochrome b dan brooks David Livingstone Gebisa Ejeta house bats Kenya new species Robert Trujillo Scotophilus Scotophilus andrewreborii Scotophilus ejetai Scotophilus livingstonii Scotophilus trujilloi Zoology Leave a reply Working from zero How exchange programs and scientific sleuthing fuel our Department of Vertebrate Zoology Published by Dan on December 23 2012 at 10 05 am in Zoology Reply Our collection focus in the Department of Vertebrate Zoology is dictated by both our exhibits and current areas of research We are heavily vested in birds and mammals and herps to a lesser extent from Texas yeehaw Africa and Latin America as well as globally threatened endangered species that transcend political boundaries Tightly correlated with this latter category are some of the exotic pheasants sadly rare in nature due to their capacity

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/tag/zoology/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Making the Stars: A Brief History of the Burke Baker Planetarium | BEYONDbones
    The passage between the planetarium and the tiny museum was a glassed in breezeway Inside the brochure was a description of the planetarium experience Burke Baker s gift has now brought the astronomy experience to more than 7 5 million people including all upper elementary students in the Houston Independent School District since 1965 Below is the fold over section showing our new Margaret Root Brown Telescope which is still behind my office on the third floor We need an access across the roof to open it up to the public once again as well as realuminizing of the mirror The telescope tracked the sun automatically and sent a live image to the planetarium and the Energy Hall in the lower level We created five new shows each year but they were much easier to produce than the two new shows we do now In 1988 the Burke Baker Planetarium was one of the first in the world to go digital In a capital campaign that funded the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre the planetarium s Friedkin Theater became a space simulator with an Evans Sutherland Digistar 1 the world s first digital planetarium projection system In 1998 a decade later the Burke Baker Planetarium was first in the United States and second in the world to install a Digital Sky full dome digital video projection system This dynamic immersive environment was funded by a grant from NASA through Rice University Now the planetarium could offer full dome animations and movies with a new slightly tilted dome and seats The planetarium s Cosmic Mysteries and Powers of Time were among the first full dome digital films produced Eighteen years later the Friedkin Theater of the Burke Baker Planetarium becomes the most advanced True 8K planetarium in the world On March 11

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2016/02/making-the-stars-a-brief-history-of-the-burke-baker-planetarium/ (2016-02-12)
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