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  • Leonids Meteor Shower Tonight! | BEYONDbones
    s early predawn hours photo credit aresauburn The Leonids will be less frequent and appear weaker this year than at the turn of the century This is because from 1999 to 2002 the Earth was moving through a clump of debris left by comet Tempel Tuttle In those years the Leonids were strong enough to be considered a storm over 1 000 meteorites per hour Now Tempel Tuttle has receded from the Sun taking its main debris clumps with it Therefore the Leonid showers aren t as dramatic anymore typically averaging only about one every few minutes The 2009 Leonids are expected to be stronger than usual but not nearly as good as at the beginning of the decade Although they may be few in number many Leonid meteors are quite bright The meteors will seem to radiate from the constellation Leo which will be high in the east hence the name of the shower You ll see approximately one meteor every 2 or 3 minutes or fewer if clouds or city lights are present 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Astronomy and tagged Astronomy geminids HMNS leonids leonids meteor leonids meteors meteor showers meteor storms meteors night sky perseids space by James Bookmark the permalink About James James is the Planetarium Astronomer at the Houston Museum of Natural Science He teaches students every school morning in the planetarium and also answers astronomy questions from the public View all posts by James 3 thoughts on Leonids Meteor Shower Tonight Megg on November 17 2009 at 10 36 pm said Thank you for the information pertaining to our fine town custom knife on March 16 2012 at 9 27 am said Hello this is unquestionably a certainlygreat posting In theory I d wish to create articles like this as

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/leonids-meteor-shower-tonight/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Nodipecten fragosus | BEYONDbones
    Tina the museum s associate curator of malacology She has chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating shells and animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Lion s Paws Nodipecten fragosus Conrad 1849 The Nodipecten fragosus is a member of the Pectinidae family and ranges from Cape Hatterus North Carolina through Florida and the Gulf of Mexico The colors are variable from brown purple pink orange red to yellow and multiple colors appearing on a single specimen It gets its common name from the knobs formed on the outer surfaces of both valves which resemble the paws of a lion As a member of the Pecten family they are edible as a scallop but do not occur in sufficient members to make them a reliable source commercially Learn more Dive into the Malacology Hall a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/100-years-100-objects-nodipecten-fragosus/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Watch out for that space boulder! | BEYONDbones
    discover them at random NASA runs a search program Spaceguard to detect larger objects 1 km and up that may pose a civilization ending threat to Earth So far about 85 of those objects have been found none pose an immediate threat to Earth but may in future decades Jet Propulsion Lab depiction of recent close pass by 2009 VA Impacts of small objects like 2009 VA create only sky high fireworks no harm to us here on the ground But the Tunguska impact in Siberia a century ago devastated 2 000 square km of Siberian forest That airburst of about 5 megatons Mt of TNT equivalent was caused by an object 30 40 m in diameter large enough to level a city center Such an object strikes us every few hundred years The last one was a century ago the next one to come along may hit us tomorrow With current telescopes we have only a small chance of seeing such an object before it strikes Earth Congress has asked NASA to look into what it would cost to search systematically for NEOs down to 140 m in diameter if we found most of those objects we would have greater confidence that no city buster NEO is headed for an imminent collision with a populated area on Earth A report to NASA on the prospects of detecting and even deflecting such potentially hazardous NEOs is due out by year s end from the National Research Council Impact or cosmic bombardment is a process that has been altering the faces of the planets since the dawn of the solar system 4 6 billion years ago Impacts by giant comets and asteroids have changed the course of life on Earth possibly ending the reign of dinosaurs 65 million years ago and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/watch-out-for-that-space-boulder/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Ankylosaurus | BEYONDbones
    full scale recreation of the dinosaur Ankylosaurus This recreation of a late cretaceous herbivore was created by the Sinclair Oil Company for the exhibit Sinclair Dinoland which opened at the 1964 1965 Worlds Fair in New York Dr Barnum Brown acted as a consultant to world renowned zoological sculptor Louis Paul Jonas to create a paleontological menagerie of dinosaurs that would showcase the Dinosaurs of the Mesozoic This would be the end of Dr Barnum Brown s long paleontological career and association with Sinclair oil as he died shortly before the fair opened in 1964 The dinosaurs were created at Louis Paul Jonas Studios and then transported to the fair grounds past New York City on a flat barge in a brilliant and surreal publicity stunt In addition to carrying the Sinclair banner at national stops by train and flatbed trucks the dinosaur sculptures were used by Sinclair in other advertising campaigns such as the print ad you see here featuring the Houston Ankylosaur advertising the dinosaurs and the Dinoland exhibit After the closing of the fair the models toured the country on specially constructed flatbed trailers Visiting Houston in 1966 and 1968 the nationwide tours attracted millions of visitors One of the Houston visits was to Gulfgate Mall the first shopping mall in the city The second was to HMNS The Museum newly expanded in 1969 had empty space and the popularity of these visits was not lost on Museum staff The Jonas Dinosaur menagerie was conceived as being an outdoor exhibit and after the fair and all the national tours all but two of the sculptures in the collection ended up as open air exhibits The Houston Ankylosaurus remained indoors and though modified it is perhaps the best preserved of the Sinclair Dinoland models Learn more about the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/100-years-100-objects-ankylosaurus/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Friday Night Lights | BEYONDbones
    the universe It is the first fuel of stars But other then the sun this star stuff is important down on the ground It s important because it can be used as fuel to power cars homes or anything else that uses electricity You may have heard of hydrogen fuel cells These devices use hydrogen and oxygen atoms to create electricity Current hydrogen fuel cell vehicles can range from 30 to 50 fuel efficiency while the internal combustion engine only uses 20 of the fuel to make a vehicle run The rest is given off in heat energy into the atmosphere So why hasn t the hydrogen fuel cell replaced gasoline yet There are a number of reasons There are only 65 hydrogen stations in the United States We have been building gas stations for 100 years with the first station being built in 1905 and the second in 1907 It will take a while to replace gas stations with hydrogen stations Also hydrogen cells are still cutting edge technology and will stay that way until it becomes proven and affordable Only then will it get put into mass production It took around 50 years for the car to take off not literally yet but I am still waiting for my flying DeLorean There is also the problem of making the hydrogen While it is the most abundant element in the universe it is rare on rocky blue and green planets like the one we happen to live on One of the ways to produce hydrogen is to use natural gas which still leaves all the carbon around When I lead groups of children through the Wiess Energy Hall I stop by the hydrogen cell tell them about it and tell them that they are the ones who will be

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/friday-night-lights/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Ludlockite | BEYONDbones
    description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Ludlockite Tsumeb Mine Tsumeb Namibia Ludlockite was originally found in a single boulder on the dump of the Tsumeb mine It was described as a new species in 1972 based on that single occurrence Subsequently a second very limited occurrence was found deeper in the mine Consequently very few specimens of the species are known This beautiful reddish brown 4 cm spray on zincian siderite crystals is among the finest Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and tagged gems HMNS Ludlockite mineralogy minerals Namibia siderite siderite

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/100-years-100-objects-ludlockite/ (2016-02-12)
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  • A Farewell to Claude Levi-Strauss | BEYONDbones
    in a copious number of publications including The Raw and the Cooked Disappearing Amazonian cultures photo credit Cristina Mittermeier He kept close watch on indigenous cultures as he transitioned from fieldwork to more academic endeavors During his lifetime Lévi Strauss witnessed the disappearance of more than 90 tribes and 15 languages in that part of world This process is ongoing This is not the place to expand on his many contributions to the field of anthropology others have already done so This brief note is meant to mark his passing to acknowledge his contributions in the field of the indigenous people of the Americas His interest in Amazonian cultures led him to write a brief but much appreciated note about the high quality of the Amazon artifacts in what is now the core of HMNS Amazon collection Upon receiving exhibit catalogs in 1997 he wrote to Adam Mekler HMNS associate curator Amazonia This is to acknowledge receipt of and thank you for the two volumes on Amazonian art you were kind enough to send me They are truly splendid as all the objects illustrated are of the highest quality I am delighted to have them in my personal library With

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/a-farewell-to-claude-levi-strauss/ (2016-02-12)
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  • HMNS Expansion: Breaking Ground Nov. 19! | BEYONDbones
    of science education and know how important science and a science literate population will be to the future of Houston Now we re breaking ground on our new wing on Nov 19 2009 but we must raise 25 million more before we can complete the expansion and meet our goal of becoming the world s best science museum right here in Houston Help us build for the future of Houston by sharing your thoughts on why HMNS is important to you your family and to Houston or join our cause on Facebook to help us spread the word about our upcoming expansion and donate to help us reach our goal Learn more about what s coming to the new Houston Museum of Natural Science from HMNS President Joel A Bartsch Let us know why a bigger better HMNS is important to you Click here Donate to the HMNS 100 Building for a Second Century of Science capital campaign Click here This is the floor plan of the Westheimer Natural History Museum at the Houston Public Library In 1922 this is where the Attwater collection one of the founding collections of the Houston Museum of Natural Science was displayed Learn more about the history of HMNS and where we re headed in the 21st century on ourCentennial web site 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts by Erin B 3 thoughts on HMNS Expansion Breaking Ground Nov 19 Michael Erickson on November 8 2009 at 1 25 pm said Hello Would anyone be able to forward a question to Dr

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/11/hmns-expansion-breaking-ground-nov-19/ (2016-02-12)
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