archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Science Friday: DNA Testing | BEYONDbones
    you this weekly feature Science Friday a science talk show produced by NPR Each week a new video takes on a different on science topic in an effort to bring an educated balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand You may remember that we started this feature more than a year ago but technical difficulties kept us from making it a regular appearance Thanks to the fine folks at SciFri however I think we ve got it figured out Hopefully we ll be bringing you the science y goodness every Friday from now on This week we follow two high school students from New York as they perform a DNA test on foods to see just what ingredients are in our everyday meals They review if goat milk really comes from goats the origin of caviar and what exactly goes into New York City hot dogs Can t see the video Click here to view it 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged beetles dna evolution new species npr science friday by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/science-friday-dna-testing/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Imperial Dining with the Tsars | BEYONDbones
    the Great s reforms to modernize Russia included the introduction of European cuisine into Russia Catherine the Great patronized French culture and cuisine at her court Many famous French chefs staffed the kitchens of Russian royalty and diplomats Russia however proved a challenge to these French chefs the climate was often too cold and it was necessary to adapt French recipes to the local Russian ingredients cultural traditions and religious fasting Yet French cuisine was not reserved only for the wealthy of Russia With the publication of Elena Molokhovets cookbook A Gift to Young Housewives in 1861 women of modest households could prepare simpler versions of expensive dishes serve them in a refined manner and ensure the happiness and welfare of their families By the time of the Russian Revolution in 1917 over 250 000 of her cookbooks had been sold The Romanov dynasty and famous Russians also inspired the names of many French dishes which were later translated into English Examples of such dishes include Strawberries Romanoff Beef Stroganoff and Veal Orloff When Grand Duke Alexei visited the United States as a Russian goodwill ambassador in 1871 the French chef of Delmonico s restaurant in New York City created Duke Alexis Lobster and Crawfish Soup in his honor Imperial Dining with the Tsars will explore the fascinating history of Franco Russian cuisine in the elegant Grand Salon of La Colombe d Or Join us for this extravagant dinner on March 23 2010 Reserve your tickets here Also make sure to get your tickets to see our exhibit Faberge Imperial Jeweler to the Tsars while you still can this exhibition is leaving HMNS July 25 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Science by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/imperial-dining-with-the-tsars/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Webisode: Space Glasses! [Hubble 3D] | BEYONDbones
    amazing photos of the universe around us courtesy of NASA Hubble 3D will transport you to galaxies that are 13 billion light years away back to the edge of time Just can t wait until March 19 Never fear IMAX is releasing webisodes from the production of the film and we ll be featuring them here on the blog In the first webisode find out what happens when you launch a billion dollar telescope with an off kilter lens and just how delicate this spectacular instrument really is In this behind the scenes interview astronaut Mike Massimino talks about his space mission to repair the Hubble Telescope in May of 2009 Can t see the video Click here to watch it Check back here for exclusive videos and more behind the scenes interviews before and after the launch of Hubble 3D in IMAX 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Giant Screen Theatre Science and tagged galaxies galaxy Giant Screen Theatre Hubble 3D hubble images hubble telescope huble Mike Massimino NASA universe by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college would be in public relations and on top of that working

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/webisode-space-glasses-hubble-3d/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • For all the future Entomologists out there… | BEYONDbones
    make time for that because every year I get the chance to write a research paper and present it to other entomologists at a conference This year I m working on a paper about the Giant Katydid Macrolyristes corporalis which is such an amazing insect I ve already written a couple of blogs about it To me this career is very unique because I m not just stuck in a lab I am kind of like a teacher consultant scientist and caretaker all rolled into one which makes for a very fun and interesting job I even get to travel In 2008 I got to go to Costa Rica to see bugs in the rainforest it was awesome I learned all about bugs in college but I ve learned far more here from actually getting to work with live insects and observe their life cycles and behaviors A lot of labs are full of dried specimens of dead bugs which can be cool too but I m very happy to be here 5 Finally how would I become one To be honest I don t know many colleges or schools that practice entomology and you just don t see ads in the paper for entomologists Good question Well I went to Texas A M for college and it is the only University in the state of Texas from which you can receive a degree in Entomology I m not sure where you live but in most states there is at least one university that offers this type of degree The internet is a great resource for this just google degree programs in Entomology and that should get you started Next you will have to decide how far you want to go I only have a bachelors in Entomology just because for now I can t afford anymore college but I plan to get a masters someday soon and eventually a PhD In college you will have so many resources available to you that will help you figure out what jobs are available and what you want to do Like I said there are so many different things you can do with a degree in Entomology These jobs can take you anywhere in the country even several places around the world You can even do my job almost anywhere Most states in the U S and even countries in Europe Asia Australia and South America have museum with insects zoos and butterfly houses much like ours and they always need good Entomologists Well Derek I hope this helps you My best advice is to keep doing what your doing and studying insects You may have people even family members and friends tell you that Entomology is not a good career choice Only because most people don t know much about Entomology or even bugs in general but don t let that discourage you If you work hard and do well in school you can do anything you set your mind to

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/for-all-the-future-entomologists-out-there/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Go Stargazing! March Edition | BEYONDbones
    dusk due south by the end of the month for a reddish point of light sort of in line with the two Dog Stars Jupiter is mostly out of sight this month Viewers with a very clear east southeast horizon may notice Jupiter low in the sky at dawn by the end of March photo credit kevindooley Dazzling Orion is high in the south His belt points up to Aldebaran the eye of Taurus the Bull The Dog Stars Sirius and Procyon are to Orion s left Sirius is the brightest star we ever see at night Gemini the Twins are to Orion s upper left Look for two stars of equal brightness less than 5 degrees three fingers at arms length apart These are Castor and Pollux marking the twins heads High in the northwest is Capella the sixth brightest star ever seen at night At dusk on March evenings look below Sirius and a bit to its right for Canopus the second brightest star we ever see at night This star is in the keel bottom of the legendary ship Argo Canopus is so far south that most Americans never get to see it We however are far enough to the south that it barely rises for us remaining low on the southern horizon Meanwhile spring stars are rising in the east A distinct backwards question mark shape outlines the mane and forepaws of Leo the Lion Three stars forming a right triangle rise underneath they mark Leo s hindquarters The Big Dipper is once again fully risen at dusk Later in the evening you can extend its handle to arc to Arcturus and then speed on to Spica These stars will be along the eastern horizon by 9 30 tonight and even earlier later in the month

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/go-stargazing-march-edition-2/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Eyes Have It: Evolutionary Development and DNA | BEYONDbones
    master program for making eyes can cause an eye to grow on a fly s leg body antenna or inside the body depending on where it is placed on the DNA strand Check out the drawing showing the results of moving the master program for legs to the site of the antenna Note that the extra legs are fully formed but lack the neuron connections to the brain and so are not functional In the references box is a link to an electron microscope image of a real fruit fly that shows a mutation in which eyes replace antennae Various mollusks like clams snails and octopuses grow eyes that vary in complexity from very simple sensitive pits to complex eyes that would compete well with human eyes The EXACT SAME eye master program from a fruit fly can replace the eye master program for a squid and it will grow a perfectly functional squid eye You might be tempted to say that fruit flies and squids are cousins Fruit fly with extra legs replacing the antennae Image courtesy of The Exploratorium That is an amazing statement but to take it even further the same experiment with a mouse eye master program will grow fly eyes on flies and squid eyes on squids They only differ by the small switch segments These experiments establish a link between vertebrates and invertebrates that paleontologists are unlikely to find in the rock record This also helps explain the amazing degree of structural similarity between mice and men although many of the master programs are similar the really critical parts of the DNA are the small switches that control the details Mollusks have just one master program that is controlled by different switches Pectens for example have the most complex vision arrangement of any animal with three different types of eyes on its body The DNA can be experimentally adjusted to grow any of these eyes anywhere on the body Random mutations could thus cause novel arrangements and survival would judge their fitness evolution in action The switch concept explains how mice chimps and humans can have a similar number of genes The switches control the result of the master programs You can pick up any modern textbook and read that men and chimps have nearly identical genes It is the switches that make us different and that provide the evolutionary means for dramatic changes good and bad The fossil record is full of cases where a dramatic new species just appears Paleontologists have often wondered if this was caused by a missing rock interval by migration or by rapid evolution The concept of rapid evolution has often been discounted because it seemed to violate the incremental nature of evolution We now can see how rapid evolution may just be a single point mutation in a switch There are numerous biological examples where altering one protein is lethal as in Tay Sachs disease or altering another might bear strongly on survival as in changing the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/the-eyes-have-it-evolutionary-development-and-dna/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hittin’ the road with the HMNS Paleo crew! | BEYONDbones
    it was really enjoyable first day at the site Over the next two days after Dr Bakker arrived we visited several other sites on the property and I got a chance to work on excavating a dimetrodon spine map some dig sites here s a fun school dig site mapping activity learn about other findings like the diplocaulus or boomerang head skull we re looking at in the photo above I enjoyed the opportunity to work alongside the experts and learn about all of the preparation work that is required for each and every specimen that will be in the new Paleontology hall coming soon here at the Houston Museum of Natural Science I can t wait to see everything on display in the new wing of the Museum it s going to be so exciting For more information about what fossils are found at the dig site in Seymour check out some of the entries on the Prehistoric CSI blog you can also find some really awesome illustrations on that site to bring the animals to life 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged bakker cartilage coprolites dig Dimetordon diplocaulus fossils HMNS HMNS Paleo Program houston museum of natural science mapping Paleontology prehistoric CSI rocks Seymour spine teeth texas by Allison Bookmark the permalink About Allison After volunteering at HMNS since 1993 Allison joined HMNS full time in 2003 Her current job responsibilities include curating the education collections and keeping the summer camp classrooms stocked with materials facilitating Education special events and coordinating the Museum s overnight program In her spare time she volunteers with the Junior League of Houston and spends her time in artistic pursuits View all posts by Allison 2 thoughts on Hittin the road with the HMNS Paleo crew Chad on

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/03/hittin-the-road-with-the-hmns-paleo-crew/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lessons from Faberge: Skill Trumps Modern Technology | BEYONDbones
    on the first floor there was a pot borrowed from the Menil Collection that was made out of hard igneous porphyry It also looked like it had been turned on a lathe but this time it had hanging lugs would get in the way I wonder how they did that My most recent humbling experience comes from the Faberg exhibit One signature Faberg technology is transparent enamel over patterned metal The process used to draw the swirling lines on the metal is called guilloche after the gentleman who created the process in order to make banknotes hard to counterfeit The process uses gears that run inside of other gears to make the pattern you can readily see the mechanism if you look at the modern toy called a Spirograph Select a toothed wheel a toothed circle for it to run in and a position inside the toothed wheel for your pencil and wow you get perfect mathematical loops If you used a cutting tool you could mark the engraving plate used to print bank notes or stock certificates Though the US Mint probably has a much better ruling engine because it draws on printing plates the process is the same Spirograph a plastic toy used to draw curves Picture taken from a specimen produced and old in the USSR kept in author s private collection Photo by Alexei Kouprianov Marking up bank note printing plates is comparatively easy compared to ruling this little egg This is because it has the pattern turned all the way around it above and below it I bet there is a pattern follower that can track about an object but I do not know The engraved surface on the egg has been enameled covered with ground up glass and metal oxides all melted together The Faberge factories were famous for the fancy colors they could produce Ladies of the court would have dresses made to complement the new colors I suppose it just would not do to clash with your cigarette case color The large number of colors maybe 170 made it possible for the factory to claim that each object is unique The Fabergé craftsmen used transparent but colored enamels to allow the fancy guilloche patterns to show through I guess it is a bit retro to be using machines built in 1920 but the results are fabulous Almost no one but the high end watch companies still use them because it can take an engraver many hours to do a watch face Embossing a finish on metal with a hydraulic press is a much more common technique If you need to do better computer controlled milling machines are now priced within the range of many shops say 20 000 We might expect to see some really new designs from these in the future Want to try your hand at guilloche There is an interactive site where you can vary all the parameters and produce the most amazing patterns in real time This is

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/04/lessons-from-faberge-skill-trumps-modern-technology/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •