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  • Corpse Flower Watch: Webcam! | BEYONDbones
    in the meantime KRPC Ch 2 also has a webcam with a live feed of the Corpse Flower and you can access it here We are very sorry for any inconvenience or frustration this has caused If you are still unable to view the webcam we also have photos blog posts and videos with regular updates on Lois status UPDATE 2 We are getting reports that the webcam does not function in Google Chrome We recommend using Internet Explorer of Firefox with the plugin linked above for the best performance 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged corpse flower lois rare flower rare plant world s largest flower by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts by Erin B 11 thoughts on Corpse Flower Watch Webcam Bea on July 10 2010 at 7 23 am said Will the museum be open later hours I was really hoping to get to see it but I work this weekend and don t get out until 7pm Steve S on July 10 2010 at 9 26 am said FOR Mac USERS There are better options than WMV video but at this point it s too late for the HMNS to do anything about it but there is a fix for that Download and install the Flip4Mac Player which can be gotten at the link in the blog where it states get it here I ve been using it for years to view WMV files and it works just fine Watching online gives you the opportunity to know when Lois bloom begins to open keeping you from getting there too soon and missing the real event It s what I m doing Erin F on July 10 2010 at 9 43 am said Hi Bea We have a private event tonight but we are prepared to stay open late tomorrow night if there are lots of people who still want to get in to see Lois Call 713 639 4629 to check before you come by laanba on July 10 2010 at 9 51 am said Flip4Mac is working for me this morning It was not last night but it may have been just the firewall issue I think HMNS is a leader in using online media to share their story so hopefully you can find some loose change in the couch cushions to upgrade some of the equipment Erin F on July 10 2010 at 10 02 am said I am so glad to hear Flip4Mac is working for you guys thank you for your patience Laurie we will definitely be checking the couch cushions under the desks outturning pockets Steve S on July 10 2010 at 10 07 am said laanba I thought Flip4Mac wasn t working last night too Found out this morning that it was not Flip4Mac

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/corpse-flower-watch-webcam/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Corpse Flower Watch: Day 9 | BEYONDbones
    0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged amorphophallus titanum corpse flower HMNS horticulture lois rare flowers rare plants by Zac Bookmark the permalink About Zac Zac joined the museum in January after returning to Houston from a stint studying plants in Hawaii He is the full time horticulturist for the Cockrell Butterfly Center and is in charge of daily maintenance and design for the rainforest exhibit Zac specializes in tropical plants particularly epiphytes and his duties in the rainforest range from feeding all of the plants and animals to hand pollinating some of the tropical fruits such as vanilla and cacao View all posts by Zac 8 thoughts on Corpse Flower Watch Day 9 AnnaMaria on July 9 2010 at 11 50 am said 2 COOL My 5 year old son is so excited He wants 2 smell it EEEWW C U HMNS Butterfly Center Erin F on July 9 2010 at 12 03 pm said We re very excited too See you guys this weekend ElenaA on July 9 2010 at 1 15 pm said I am so excited I hope it blooms by Sunday David H on July 9 2010 at 4 44 pm said Will there be a possibility a web cam will be in place to record the bloom Erin F on July 9 2010 at 4 49 pm said Hi David We re working on that right now Should have a link shortly and will post it here Erin F on July 9 2010 at 5 12 pm said The webcam is now posted You can follow the corpse flower s growth at this link http www hmnsmedia org CorpseFlower ShannAn Lawson on July 9 2010 at 8 18 pm said WOW this is one of the most amazing precious stinky miracle

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/corpse-flower-watch-day-9/ (2016-02-12)
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  • How To Stuff Your Archaeopteryx For Thanksgiving | BEYONDbones
    pubis should point backward It doesn t It points down like in an allosaur 4 So Archaeopteryx was a gut less wonder compared to a modern bird The space for the intestines was still small It couldn t digest food as fast as a modern bird can and it couldn t digest tough food items 5 Modern style bird guts didn t evolve until the Cretaceous that s why we can stuff a bird with so much stuffing on Thanksgiving How To Get Your T rex to Perch on Your Finger Evolution of the Back Grabber Toe in Birds Here is our Archaeopteryx hind foot Note that it s got a back grabber toe an inner toe that points inwards and a little backwards Modern birds usually have an even bigger back grabber toe that points further backwards This inner toe lets the bird grab a branch or a finger and hold on The toe is equivalent to our human big toe The other three toes in Archaeopteryx point forward and attach to three long ankle bones that are bound together tightly by ligaments The inner toe has just a stub of an ankle bone Anchisaurus Look at a primitive dinosaur like Anchisaurus No back grabber Instead the inner toe is thick and long and points forward The toes attach to four long ankle bones that are loose and can spread Here s the key step Meat eating dinosaurs evolved an inner toe that pointed inwards like a bird s Its ankle bone is a stub just like a bird s The three main toes have ankle bones tightly bound together like birds Raptor type dinosaurs were even more bird like with thin long ankle bones Archaeopteryx evolved from a raptor type dinosaur by enlargement of the inner toe 0

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/how-to-stuff-your-archaeopteryx-for-thanksgiving/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Corpse Flower Watch: Day 8 | BEYONDbones
    45 July 6 49 July 7 53 July 8 57 Can t see the video Click here to view Horticulturalist Zac Stayton documents the corpse flower s growth He measures it every day at 10 a m to see how fast the plant is developing When the growth slows to 2 inches or less per day we will know that the flower is getting ready to bloom Our Corpse Flower is in the News Check out Channel 2 s coverage from last night See us in the Houston Chronicle online at chron com 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged amorphophallus titanum corpse flower HMNS horticulture lois rare flowers rare plants by Zac Bookmark the permalink About Zac Zac joined the museum in January after returning to Houston from a stint studying plants in Hawaii He is the full time horticulturist for the Cockrell Butterfly Center and is in charge of daily maintenance and design for the rainforest exhibit Zac specializes in tropical plants particularly epiphytes and his duties in the rainforest range from feeding all of the plants and animals to hand pollinating some of the tropical fruits such as vanilla and cacao View all posts by Zac 5 thoughts on Corpse Flower Watch Day 8 PatrickF on July 8 2010 at 7 19 pm said I really really hope that there is a time lapse camera on this thing Erin F on July 9 2010 at 8 52 am said Yes We started one up last night and we re also going to have a webcam on it for the bloom We ll be posting the link here when it s ready Beth S on July 9 2010 at 10 09 am said This is fasciniating Love the blogs about Lois Can t

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/corpse-flower-watch-day-8/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Corpse Flower Watch: Day 7 | BEYONDbones
    open soon We are pulling out the tape measure every day at 10 a m to show you how rapidly this amazing flower is progressing Results so far Date Height July 1 31 July 2 34 July 3 37 July 4 41 July 5 45 July 6 49 July 7 53 Our most current predictions have Lois opening sometime this weekend Keep checking back to see our latest measurements and predictions of when Lois will be in full bloom Learn more about Lois and the corpse flower And check out the photo set on Flickr to see day by day growth 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged amorphophallus titanum Cockrell Butterfly Center corpse flower HMNS horticulture lois by Zac Bookmark the permalink About Zac Zac joined the museum in January after returning to Houston from a stint studying plants in Hawaii He is the full time horticulturist for the Cockrell Butterfly Center and is in charge of daily maintenance and design for the rainforest exhibit Zac specializes in tropical plants particularly epiphytes and his duties in the rainforest range from feeding all of the plants and animals to hand pollinating some of the tropical

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/corpse-flower-watch-day-7/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Amazing Amorphophallus – See It at HMNS! | BEYONDbones
    corm shoots up a single branched leaf that looks more like a small tree reaching heights of up to 20 ft and then dying back again every winter This process repeats until one year the corm is large enough and conditions are right Then it shoots up a single giant inflorescence which grows at an astonishing rate of 4 to 6 inches per day Like a calla lily the inflorescence consists of a central spadix where the pollen and ovules are produced surrounded by a leafy spathe Once fully opened the yellowish spadix of the corpse flower heats up to near human body temperature and emits an eye watering perfume that has been described as smelling like a decomposing carcass The spathe peels away from the spadix to reveal its inner surface which is the purplish color of rotten meat This appearance and the strong putrid odor function in nature to attract the carrion beetles that are believed to pollinate this smelly beauty Although little is known about the process in the wild it is speculated that the plant somehow traps the beetles for up to 24 hours to ensure successful pollination Lois at 50 inches tall Photo taken 7 6 10 See a full set of photos from today on Flickr The entire flowering process takes a little over a month but once opened the flower is very short lived In fact the smell may only last for 8 to 12 hours and the flower may begin to decline within a couple of days If the plant is successfully pollinated the spathe will fall away first revealing on the bottom part of the spadix the bright red fruits that contain seeds for new baby corpse flowers Once the flower dies back the plant may not flower again for many years if ever Eddie Holik former director of horticulture for the Cockrell Butterfly Center purchased the corm of our corpse flower from Plant Delights Nursery in 2004 The corm cost 75 and was only about the size of a walnut Since then the plant has shot up 5 leaves each one bigger than the year before We have weighed and measured the corm each year during its dormant period This spring 2010 the corm weighed exactly 30 pounds and was 14 inches across In late April instead of producing a leaf as usual it began shooting up a flower bud The bud is currently 50 inches tall and growing at a rate of about 5 inches per day Judging by recorded growth rates and pictures from other titan arums that have bloomed we are predicting that the flower will be fully opened late this week or early next week i e around July 10 or so Keep checking the blog as we will update it daily with the most current predictions In keeping with the tradition of naming these magnificent flowers we have named our titan arum Lois in honor of Eddie s mother who worked in a flower shop

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/the-amazing-amorphophallus-see-it-at-hmns/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Focus On: Trackway – The Last 30 Feet of Life [Pete Larson] | BEYONDbones
    that a certain species existed trace fossils tell us what that species was doing while there were here Trace fossils are essentially any trace that life existed These kinds of fossils come in many forms including trackways or footprints in the sand Fossil footprints that have been preserved millions of years will yield a lifetime of information about the creature a species gait if it traveled in packs or alone whether babies had maternal care and much more The particular trackway featured in our current Archaeopteryx exhibit over 30 feet long and on display through Sept 6 2010 is one of paleontologist Pete Larson s favorite fossils because of the extraordinary surprise found where the footprints end In this video Pete walks and sometimes runs it s big us through through the significance of this fossil and reveals the surprise at the end in this video Want More Tour the Archaeopteryx Exhibit with Pete Larson Focus On Thermopolis Archaeopteryx See this extraordinary fossil for yourself Visit Archaeopteryx Icon of Evolution this summer Click here for tickets 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/focus-on-trackway-the-last-30-feet-of-life-pete-larson/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Summer Adventures Continue | BEYONDbones
    camps still have a few spots open for the weeks of July 5 and July 12 A Camper holds up an impression of her teeth that she made in Crime Scene Investigators Check out Crime Scene Investigators where kids can learn how to lift and develop fingerprints sample soils cast footprints and teeth and make rope impressions Use special software to create a face to match the description of witnesses Assemble your own crime kit and use your skills to collect clues at a crime scene in the museum In Junior Science Magic campers discover how physics and chemistry make magic They experiment with optical illusions and things that glow in the dark They master cool chemistry tricks concoct slimy mixtures and potions that change colors They will also learn how magicians read minds and will be able to fool their friends with coin and card tricks DJ Learns about static electricity Anaya punctures an inflated balloon with a skewer Alone marooned scared cold and hungry Could your kid survive You betcha Campers learn to distill drinking water and make it into a refreshing drink that would quench any thirst They will participate in an indoor campfire cookout learn to navigate by the stars tell time from the sun and build their own compass They ll make their own sunscreen and find out what kind of bugs make good snacks A camper signals in morse code using a mirror Don t miss your chance to sign up 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education Science and tagged HMNS Houston summer Houston summer camps learn magic magic for kids learn morse code Summer Camps by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college would be in public relations and on top of

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/07/summer-adventures-continue/ (2016-02-12)
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