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  • Mala-what? Walk Through our Malacology Hall | BEYONDbones
    is such an unfamiliar term It means the study of mollusks Maybe it s the fact that it s just steps away from the stunning Hall of Gems and Minerals Whatever the reason it seems this hall just doesn t get the foot traffic I think that it deserves The Hall of Malacology is so named because it features the amazing animals that live inside shells not just the beautiful homes they leave behind The collection on display includes stunners like the world s largest shell it s HUGE and Busycon perversum or Lightning Whelk the Texas State Shell as well as tons of fascinating information on these soft bodied wonders In the video below associate curator David Temple walks us through the HMNS Hall of Malacology and shares some of the most interesting items on display Enjoy Can t see the video Click here 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged collection conchology david temple malacology research Science shells by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/09/mala-what-walk-through-our-malacology-hall/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Adventures Among Ants | BEYONDbones
    relationships with plants or other insects Although a few ants are household pests and some may cause agricultural or other damage many are beneficial in terms of controlling pest populations cleaning up wastes and aerating the soil All ants are social there are no solitary species Some are tiny less than 1 16 of an inch long while some tropical species are over an inch in length Depending on the species ant colonies may be made up of only a few individuals while others number in the millions In this and other ways ant societies appear to parallel human societies Some are simple hunter gatherers with little specialization among workers while others have huge and sophisticated societies with highly specialized tasks divided among different castes Driver ants in Africa and army ants in South America are ruthless predators moving in huge numbers from temporary bivouac to bivouac in search of prey Any of us who read Leinigin versus the ants when we were in school can still remember the terror inspired by the image of a huge river of driver ants overrunning everything in its path Leafcutter ants also have huge colonies but theirs are sedentary and underground sometimes lasting more than 20 years Leafcutters are farmers chewing up fresh leaves and fertilizing them with their saliva and feces to provide a rich substrate for the fungus they cultivate as food for the colony Harvester ants in dry grasslands stockpile seeds in underground storage areas Other ants are ranchers herding and protecting groups of tiny honey dew producing insects such as scale and aphids Desert dwelling honeypot ants use their own sisters as cisterns to store honeydew Formica ants in boreal forests make huge mounds of pine and spruce needles which serve to regulate temperature and humidity Some ants do

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/09/adventures-among-ants/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Archaeopteryx – The Fossil that Proved Darwin was Right | BEYONDbones
    reptile and make it into a bird Archaeopteryx changed all that It was a bird because it had the complex flight feathers clearly preserved Feathers implied hot bloodedness And the brain appeared to be bigger than what a typical reptile had Plus the hind legs had long narrow ankles like a bird s not the flat footed feet of a reptile Archaeopteryx had three main hind toes pointing forward and a smaller toe pointed inward the bird pattern not the five toed hind paw of a typical reptile The Archaeopteryx wing had three fingers arranged like a bird s not five as in most reptiles But Archaeopteryx possessed extraordinarily primitive reptilian features too The tail had a long line of bony vertebrae Modern birds have only a short stubby vertebral column in the tail Archaeopteryx had the three fingers of the hand separate instead of having the outer two fingers fused together Archaeopteryx had big sharp claws on each of the three fingers instead of the blunt tipped fingers of typical birds And Archaeopteryx had a mouthful of teeth instead of a modern bird s beak More evidence of how birds evolved came in 1868 Professor Cope in New Jersey and Professor Huxley and Phillips in Oxford showed that meat eating dinosaurs had been put together all wrong Dinosaur legs weren t flat footed and five toed Carnivorous dinosaurs in fact had long slim legs with ankles held high off the ground and the hind foot had three main toes pointing forward So these dinosaurs had bird style legs Dinosaurs bridged most of the gap between primitive reptiles and Archaeopteryx Most progressive paleontologists accepted the theory that A rchaeopteryx evolved from a dinosaur The case became iron clad in the 1880 s to early 1900 s Excavations in the American

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/09/archaeopteryx-the-fossil-that-proved-darwin-was-right/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Go Stargazing! September Edition | BEYONDbones
    we see Jupiter rise at sundown and set at sunup Jupiter is up literally all night long During the whole month though Jupiter is visible virtually the whole night It outshines all stars in the sky so it s easy to find Face east in late evening or south southwest at dawn to see it The planet Uranus is less than one degree above Jupiter this month the two planets are closest on September 18 The Big Dipper is setting in the northwest at dusk you now need a horizon clear of trees and tall buildings to get a good look at it You can extend the curve of its handle to arc to Arcturus which is in the west at dusk tonight Arcturus by the way is the fourth brightest star we ever see at night but the brightest one Americans ever see on a September evening As the Dipper gets lower look for five stars in the shape of an M directly across the North Star from the Big Dipper s handle This is Cassiopeia the Queen the M is the outline of her throne Her stars are about as bright as the North Star and the stars of the Big Dipper so she s not too hard to find photo credit livepine High overhead look for the enormous Summer Triangle consisting of the stars Deneb Vega and Altair This triangle was up all night long from June to early August hence its name Scorpius the Scorpion is in the southwest at dusk Sagittarius the Archer known for its teapot asterism is to its left Between these two star patterns is the center of our Milky Way the brightest part of that band as wee see it On a cloudless night far from the big city see if

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/09/go-stargazing-september-edition-3/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Dino Days 2010 and the Create-a-saurus Contest for kids! | BEYONDbones
    must be turned in to the Create a saurus table at Dino Days during the hours of the event 11am 3pm on November 6 th or postmarked by November 4 2010 Mailed entries should be sent to HMNS Education Department 5555 Hermann Park Drive Houston TX 77030 By entering the contest you give permission for your artwork first name and age to be displayed or reproduced by HMNS Winning entries will be posted on the HMNS BeyondBones blog with the artist s first name and age winners will be responsible for contacting HMNS staff member noted in the post announcing the winners to claim their prize before December 15 2010 One 1 grand prize winner will receive a Museum Family Membership three 3 winners one for each age bracket 0 3 4 8 9 12 will be awarded honorable mention and receive a set of four 4 Museum passes Questions regarding these rules or the Create a saurus contest please contact Allison Kellogg akellogg hmns org for more information We can t wait to see you at Dino Days and introduce you to our awesome world of Paleo fun 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology by Allison Bookmark the permalink About Allison After volunteering at HMNS since 1993 Allison joined HMNS full time in 2003 Her current job responsibilities include curating the education collections and keeping the summer camp classrooms stocked with materials facilitating Education special events and coordinating the Museum s overnight program In her spare time she volunteers with the Junior League of Houston and spends her time in artistic pursuits View all posts by Allison 3 thoughts on Dino Days 2010 and the Create a saurus Contest for kids Alison Malkhassian on November 5 2010 at 3 49 pm said I am looking for

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/dino-days-2010-and-the-create-a-saurus-contest-for-kids/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Frustrating Science of Earthquake Prediction | BEYONDbones
    are quite cooperative in giving fairly easy to recognize indications of approaching violence Signs of unrest are usually first recognized by seismologists giving us a smug feeling of understanding a complex geophysical phenomenon better than our fellow earth scientists Of course volcanoes throw a variety of eruption precursory signs out that can result in a variety of types of eruptions Just when we think we understand what is going on things change to surprise us Still eruption prediction is maturing and it is gratifying to know that our science is being used to actually save lives 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Unfortunately earthquakes are far more hazardous than volcanoes since strong ones can occur in many parts of the world particularly places where earthquake resistant building construction is not up to the task Attempts to predict specific earthquakes are many yet it seems that no more than would be expected from random chance are successful There are a few lines of inquiry that may provide for slight improvement in the statistical success of prediction but most of us hate claiming success based on the statistics of small numbers In the last ten years a new geophysical phenomenon has been discovered that may help us to understand the source of large earthquakes and therefore contribute to future successful predictions This phenomenon is called Episodic Tremor and Slip ETS First discovered in Japan using a new generation of very sensitive seismographs we have also detected it in the US first in the Pacific Northwest and then in Alaska and California This very subtle phenomenon may be much more pervasive than first thought and may lead us to a very new and better understanding of the earthquake initiation process ETS can be seen both seismically and geodetically and thus requires the cooperation of different

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/the-frustrating-science-of-earthquake-prediction/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Where do we go from here | BEYONDbones
    stop new wells or modification of existing wells that had obtained their permits before the moratorium went into effect What happened next is what almost happens with every new law it was challenged in court Judge Feldman ruled that the moratorium was overly broad and would harm the Gulf Economy A 2nd offshore drilling moratorium was put into place This time it applied to any deep water facilities with drilling capabilities And again as soon as the law was in place it was challenged in court The 2nd moratorium was to be in effect till November 30 but it was listed October 12 nearly 7 weeks early Does that mean that offshore drilling has taken off No No it does not Now there are new regulations that must be met Some of the new regulations include making the CEO responsible for making sure the well has met all the safety requirements and having equipment on site to help contain a blowout if one should occur Companies are waiting for a final list of the new regulations Some environmental organizations are unhappy with how quickly the moratorium has been lifted but some congressmen are unhappy about the moratorium effect s on the jobs in the Gulf Many of the offshore drilling platforms have left the Gulf for more profitable waters 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Energy and tagged deepwater drilling moratorium drilling regulations erergy gullf of mexico HMNS offshore drilling oil oil regulations sierra club by Daniel Bookmark the permalink About Daniel An inveterate punster amateur chef and fencer Daniel B has a double degree in History and Museum Science from Baylor He currently serves as the Assistant Program Coordinator for the Wiess Energy Hall and Adult Education at HMNS View all posts by Daniel One thought on

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/where-do-we-go-from-here/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Family Night at HMNS! See Exhibits for Reduced Prices | BEYONDbones
    China reveals surprising details about the people who lived along the ancient Silk Road For the first time ever two of the more than 100 Caucasian mummies found and preserved in the western China s inhospitable desert sands are being presented in the United States An impressive array of objects are included in the exhibition to represent the full extent of the Silk Road where lavish goods technologies and ideas between East and West were adopted and exchanged Preview the Silk Road exhibit in this video See more videos from the Silk Road exhibit on Vimeo Real Pirates 6 per person Dive into the wreck of the Whydah to discover the true stories of Real Pirates through more than 200 fascinating artifacts in the world s first exhibition of authentic pirate treasure Touch real pirate gold and marvel at gold and silver coins from all over the world cannons swords and pistols along with the ship s massive bell and discover the advanced technology that revealed these treasures to the modern world Climb aboard a replica of a real pirate ship See photos from the Real Pirates exhibit on Flickr Forgotten Gateway Coming to America Through Galveston Island 3 per person From 1845 to 1924 the Port of Galveston was a major gateway to American immigration This exhibition is the first of its kind to explore Galveston s legacy as a port of entry on a national scale It brings to light the little known yet rich era of Galveston s history and importance to the growth of Texas and the American Midwest While New York s Ellis Island s location made it a natural port for Europeans Galveston attracted a diverse group of people from Europe Mexico South and Central America and even Asia All of these exhibits include

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/family-night-at-hmns/ (2016-02-12)
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