archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • How To Rule the Sea: A Guide for Privateers 1500 – 1800s [Real Pirates] | BEYONDbones
    are expensive and no one can afford to maintain a privately owned personal navy they can loan out to you in case of a war Here s a hint how about getting the merchant ships you are protecting to do some of the fighting for you It sounds like a good idea but how would you do it The answer is by legalizing piracy and creating what are called privateers or privately owned ships that are willing to fight for you The incentive for privateers to put themselves in harm s way was that they would often be able to keep or sell off any cargo or ships that they captured Additionally they sometimes could also receive a prize or bounty for capturing ships This is exactly what nations did from the 1500s through the 1800s and it allowed them to use armed ships and sailors without spending tax dollars to build and maintain a navy Step aboard a recreation of the pirate ship Whydah in the Real Pirates exhibition now open And see a full set of photos from the exhibit on Flickr The first step in becoming a privateer or legal pirate was to receive a letter of marque Simply put a letter of marque is an agreement between the owner of a ship and the government that allows the ship to attack a rival nation s trading vessels One of the advantages of having a letter of marque over freelance piracy was that if you were captured by a rival nation s navy you would be treated as a military prisoner instead of being hung for piracy Privateers were so effective that the British government began to license privateers to attack and capture pirates that were plaguing the Atlantic during the 1700s These privateers were remarkably effective

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/how-to-rule-the-sea-a-guide-for-privateers-1500-1800s-real-pirates/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Preview our new web site! [new.hmns.org] | BEYONDbones
    site shows what s available for the rest of today and lets you select any future date you might be interested in It s built to be current Faster Performance Key items are cached on the server side to allow for quicker retrieval of dynamic information More Space With the wider format we have much more room to share images and information that reflect what s going on at the Museum and hopefully give you a better idea of what you re interested in checking out Multimedia features Photos and videos that are related to our events and exhibitions are much easier to access and view within the new site Accessibility The entire site complies with web content accessibility guidelines This is just the beginning we have many more ideas for functionality on the site that we ll be rolling out over the next year These include but certainly aren t limited to Social integration In the current preview our social communities on Facebook and Twitter as well as our blog are much more easily accessible We re working with APIs from these plus Flickr YouTube and FourSquare to bring more social interactivity into the site itself while also making it easy for you to navigate out into your favorite social networks Online Museum Store Our museum store has some really unique items from handmade fair trade art to astronaut ice cream and we ll be making those available online What else Check out the site and let us know how what you think it needs We know we haven t thought of everything Help us make the new site an even better experience for you visit http new hmns org to check it out We re planning to replace our existing site with this new design at the end

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/preview-our-new-web-site-new-hmns-org/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Go Stargazing! October Edition | BEYONDbones
    and you can t miss it The Big Dipper happens to be to the lower left of the North Star at dusk this month you ll need a clear northern horizon to get a good look at it Sagittarius the Archer known for its teapot asterism is in the southwest Look for the enormous Summer Triangle consisting of the stars Deneb Vega and Altair high in the west As familiar summer patterns shift to the west the constellations of autumn take center stage The Great Square of Pegasus is high in the east at dusk The star in its upper left hand corner is also the head of Andromeda Facing north you ll see five stars in a distinct M like shape this is Cassiopeia the Queen Her stars are about as bright as those in the Big Dipper and she is directly across the North Star from that Dipper In fall while the Dipper is low Cassiopeia rides high The vast stretch of sky under Pegasus is largely devoid of bright stars ancients called this the Celestial Sea The only first magnitude star in the entire region is Fomalhaut in the Southern Fish Jupiter s stark brilliance is even more remarkable against this dim backdrop Comet Hyakutake A comet may become visible to the naked eye later this month If you recall comets Hyakutake and Hale Bopp from the 90s this one won t be quite that bright but it should be visible from dark sites when no moon is out and definitely visible in binoculars It is Comet Hartley 2 and it makes its closet approach to Earth at just 0 12 AU on October 20 On that date it will appear near the star Capella in Auriga Therefore it will rise in the northeast at dusk on

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/go-stargazing-october-edition-3/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Blogger! Meet Ben, the Maritime Man [Real Pirates] | BEYONDbones
    both jobs immensely For me the most rewarding aspect of working in the museum field is bringing science and history to life for kids of all ages and letting them experience the past as well as learning in general in fun hands on ways This year I landed my dream job at the Houston Maritime Museum and I have been enjoying it ever since Honestly I enjoy learning about maritime history in general but pirates just happen to be the icing on the cake I think the reason I like maritime history so much is because I grew up in Baytown near the Ship Channel so I was never far from the water and large boats That combined with my many visits to maritime museums like the Battleship Texas and the Nimitz Museum just made me feel right at home in the field Learn more about the Real Pirates exhibition on the exhibit web site What is the most fascinating thing on display at the Maritime Museum Everyone has their favorites but I would have to say that the model we have of the Chinese Junk is my personal favorite at the moment Although it is a fairly unassuming model once you get into the history of some of the people that sailed the Junks their stories are pretty amazing I actually wrote a blog about a Mrs Cheng coming soon who was arguably one of the most successful pirates east or west to ever live The story has everything from awkward family drama to murder and mayhem on the high seas I don t want to give away too much here so you will have to read my blogs to get the whole scoop What do you hope people will learn from your upcoming posts on the HMNS blog

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/new-blogger-meet-ben-the-maritime-man-real-pirates/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Great Swarms of Bees! | BEYONDbones
    larva a special diet of royal jelly This amazing substance is produced by worker bees All bee larvae get a bit of this extremely nutritious secretion but are also fed a lot of bee bread a mixture of pollen and honey In contrast baby queens are fed royal jelly exclusively As a result of this special diet they grow bigger thus needing the special cell are fertile and develop several days faster than the sterile worker bees Queen bees also can live for several years while workers survive only 6 8 weeks But back to the swarm At some point about half of the bees inside a crowded hive led by the old queen stream out of the hive and land some likely place in this case on the branch of a jujube tree growing only about 15 feet from the Butterfly Center They formed a tight cluster of solid bees probably 30 000 bees or so The swarm cluster may stay put for a few days while scout bees scour the surrounding area for a likely new home If they find a potential new home usually in some sort of cavity the group migrates en masse to take up residence Since swarms can sometimes take up residence where they are not wanted inside the walls of a house for example responsible beekeepers will do their best to keep their hives from swarming by being sure the hive has room to grow or by dividing a large hive in two before it swarms the presence of queen cells is a good indication of an impending swarm We don t have any way of expanding the observation hive but were happy to see that this swarm was easily accessible Suiting up See a full set of images on Flickr So Zac and I suited up and proceeded to capture the swarm Standing on a ladder Zac gently brushed the bees off the branch and into a cardboard box The first glob of bees fell with a thump to the bottom We couldn t get all of the bees but got most of them and taped a screened top over the box unfortunately it turned out to be a bit leaky We were fairly certain that we did get the queen however as the remaining bees did not stay on the branch but buzzed around uncertainly eventually returning to the observation hive All in all the bees were fairly calm during the process although we both found several stingers embedded in our gloves after we had finished Attempting to move the bees See a full set of images on Flickr Since I had lost my home bees earlier this year I had an empty hive box at home and was excited to get new bees After work that day I put the box of bees into the trunk of my car and drove home There I placed them in a corner of my yard for the night In the morning I would

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/great-swarms-of-bees/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Blogger! Meet Susanna, HMNS Construction Project Manager | BEYONDbones
    a backhoe or dump truck The latest panorama image of the construction taken just a few days ago Check out our set on Flickr for monthly images of the progress until now How similar or different is this project to others you have worked on This project has components that are similar to each of the other projects I ve worked on Managing the addition of a new wing onto an existing and operational building requires thinking about the project as being both a ground up construction job and an interior renovation project While the Expansion work doesn t include renovating the public spaces in the existing museum the construction of a brand new central plant in the new wing does involve significant work to tie into existing infrastructure and the contractor and the HMNS Building department have taken great care to make sure this process is seamless and unnoticeable to museum visitors and staff I ve also worked on projects for other prominent non profit organizations in the Museum District and Texas Medical Center and like those projects the HMNS Expansion benefits from the involvement of multiple key staff members as well as an involved Board of Trustees and Building Committee Technically speaking this is the first project I ve been involved with that has the foundation system the HMNS project does Rather than digging the basement pit and temporarily retaining the earth until the foundation walls can be formed and poured the contractor first drilled large deep concrete soldier piles side by side around the building perimeter and then began excavating the pit for the foundation and basement level The piles then serve both to retain the earth and as an integral part of the foundation wall system As the foundation work has progressed I ve really enjoyed geeking out over it What s the most exciting part of the Museum expansion project So far watching the tower crane go up and excavation get under way have been the most exciting part because they are such visible signs of progress Many people might not know that construction has been underway since late February Because the underground utility re routing other site work and the drilling and pouring of the 261 soldier piles happened entirely underground from street level the first six months of construction activity looked like little more than gardening NOW even a casual observer can see the work progressing What s the strangest thing that s happened so far It s hard to classify something as strange at a place as lively as HMNS but the excitement about Lois this summer was one of those only at the museum kinds of experiences Just one construction activity was impacted very minimally by Lois s late night and all night schedule but I can assure you that no one on the project team had corpse flower on their risk assessment radar Otherwise like most inner city projects we had a few surprises underground as we prepared the site

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/10/new-blogger-meet-susanna-hmns-construction-project-manager/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Meet our Blushing Beauties! | BEYONDbones
    phone call about a pink katydid a female Don Johnson had a girlfriend and this would hopefully lead to little pink baby katydids I got yet another phone call from a gentleman who had found a golden katydid and an orange one before that The orange one got away but he brought me the golden one So at this time I had a veritable cornucopia of colorful katydids Katydid in the wild photo credit frankcheez The pink coloration is unusual but not quite as rare as you might think The color comes from a genetic defect similar to albinism called erythrism Some animals such as flamingoes become pink because of what they eat but since katydids eat nothing but green plants with only the occasional flower it is due to a lack or abundance of certain pigments in their bodies Not many people actually understand the reason for this In tropical places it may help the katydids to camouflage themselves among pink or red flowers and plants Here in the United States however it s not much of an advantage The only katydid native to the United States known to have this genetic defect is the oblong winged katydid Amblycorypha oblongifolia The most common form of this katydid is green less common is the pink or golden form and the rarest is the orange form I wish I could have gotten my hands on the orange one Sadly Don Johnson passed away at the end of July followed by Goldie but my pink female was alive up until a couple of weeks ago continuing to lay eggs in her enclosure The eggs have started to hatch and we ll soon have baby pinkies everywhere They are fat and round with very long back legs and their color is amazing Don

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/11/meet-our-blushing-beauties/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Pirates: Romance Versus Reality | BEYONDbones
    deception as a means to outwit the evil pirates For today s audience the villainous pirate is little more than a plot device to take the viewer to exotic locales and interesting situations In this way pirates serve as a means of escapism that is fun for the family not frightening or brutal in the least The next type of common pirate portrayal is the romantic rogue which commonly adorns the covers of harlequin novels These are the tall strapping muscular pirates that whisk women away and expose them to the world of love and adventure that they were missing in their otherwise mundane lives Again the common theme here is clearly escapism from the drudgery of real life that we all face like doing the laundry and going to work While these various portrayals of pirates in their own way are interesting and worthy of an afternoon s diversion the real life stories of pirates far exceed any drama on the silver screen or hidden away in the pages of fiction For example compared to the romance novel s tall handsome pirate real pirates were often in their early to mid 20s So far so good However they were usually malnourished due to the terrible nature of their diets which made for a number of pirates with missing teeth Additionally though estimates vary their average height was considered to be about 5 foot 5 inches Rarely did these rangy young men come from the upper echelons of society Instead they were usually ex sailors that had either fallen into a thuggish lifestyle of hard living or they were captured by pirates and forced to help man the ship In short pirates were the inner city gangsters of their day photo credit country boy shane As mentioned previously we commonly think of pirates forcing people to walk the plank However they rarely indulged in such ceremonious ways of killing someone Instead if an example had to be made pirates simply made it in the most brutally effective way possible Perhaps the best example of this was written by a Miss Lucretia Parker who was briefly captured in 1825 She described the event in a letter to her brother George who lived in New York Having first divested them of every article of clothing but their shirt and trousers they fell on the unfortunate crew with the ferocity of cannibals In vain did poor Capt S attempt to touch their feelings and to move them to pity by representing to them the situation of his innocent family that he had a wife and three small children at home but alas the poor man entreated in vain His appeal was to monsters possessing hearts callous to the feelings of humanity Having received a heavy blow from one with an axe he snapped the cords with which he was bound and attempted to escape by flight but was met by another of the ruffians who plunged a knife or dirk to his heart

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2010/11/pirates-romance-versus-reality/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •