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  • Carolyn L | BEYONDbones
    ions must follow patterns over and over and over and over and over Atoms being predictable simply do what their chemical properties and the conditions temperature pressure etc indicate So what exactly does it take to go from a mess of elements and compounds to this example from the Crystals of India exhibit at HMNS Sugar Land If you ve ever tried making rock candy from sugar water or ornaments from borax solution then you have some idea what it entails something dissolved that is capable of making crystals has to slowly come out of solution usually the longer you give it the bigger it can grow and the slower it grows the more perfect the crystals Freezing water into ice also gives you crystals they just don t stick around and let you handle them conveniently at room temperature Water and solutions in water aren t the only way to get crystals molten rock cooling slowly can also give crystals but that s a little tricky for home experimentation So time is your friend for crystal growth pressure is a factor and it needs to be easier for atoms to attach to the forming crystal than to stay in solution Having a solution that is saturated or supersaturated so it can barely hold all of the dissolved material helps It also helps to have places for the crystals to start forming a tiny seed crystal or sometimes even just a rough spot on a surface can provide the nucleation sites to kick off crystal growth Are there other ways crystals and the things we consider gems can form Yes For those of us with shorter attention spans a cool way so see the process is with crystallizing hand warmers a pouch holds a saturated solution of sodium acetate When you flex a metal disk inside the pouch you kick off a chain of crystallization and end up with solid material and released heat energy Because the process is so fast in the hand warmer the individual crystals are very small and jumbled up polycrystalline oriented in all different directions and as a mass they are opaque light is refracting all over the place and relatively dull rather than shiny and smooth as slower forming large crystal faces can be The structure of most metals is also polycrystalline and things like plastic and glass even the kinds misleadingly labeled crystal are amorphous The external crystal shapes we see are related to the internal structure there are a lot of different ways atoms can pack together Practically there will always be some disruption in a crystal structure no matter how perfect it may appear which allows for some very cool effects crystals twinning impurities that alter the color the reason ruby and sapphire both corundum crystals appear different Crystals aren t always pretty Sometimes we want to prevent crystallization to avoid things like kidney stones but crystals are useful for all kinds of things optical equipment and lasers X ray crystallography to figure out structures of proteins and once upon a time DNA and silicon chips used in electronic devices Whether you prefer your crystals practical or decorative they are amazing Can t get enough crystals Check out the Crystals of India exhibit at HMNS Sugar Land free for members Posted in Education Tagged chemistry crystals Crystals of India geometry HMNS Sugar Land Houston science education Leave a reply Glow on get happy Join HMNS this Friday for a fun filled night of light at LaB 5555 GLOW Published by Carolyn L on November 26 2012 at 4 42 pm in HMNS Happenings Reply Whether they re toys that shine in the night black lights glow sticks or fireflies things that produce an eerie glow are fascinating Give a kid a glow in the dark toy or paper her ceiling in dimly shining plastic stars and she will be occupied forever She ll find ever brighter lights to charge them up ever darker places to view them for maximum glow effect and generally love exploring how it all works You know this you were that kid So what s the deal with the glow Learn how to make this amazing looking glow in the dark cocktail over at Neatorama It s 10 p m Do you know where your electrons are While there are several flavors of things that glow they all have something in common Things glow because photons are emitted when excited at a higher energy state electrons drop back to a lower more stable state Aside from promising them a pony or a tour of CERN there are several ways to get your electrons excited In chemical glow sticks a chemical reaction excites the electrons This process is called chemiluminescence Glow sticks are an excellent way to experiment with reaction rates and temperature If you want the reaction to last longer follow a kid s advice and put the glow stick in the freezer or in ice water so the reaction slows down it ll take longer to use up the chemicals in the glow stick The trade off is that because the production of photons is also slower a cold glow stick is dimmer than a warm one Fluorescence is like light recycling Fluorescent rocks laundry detergent additives paint and even some animals can re emit light after something shines on them Usually we re talking about things getting hit with ultraviolet or black light and re emitting within the visible spectrum This makes sense because as you progress along the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation visible light is a bit lower in energy than ultraviolet light you can t expose something to lower energy red light and get it to fluoresce in UV for example Fluorescent things certainly fluoresce in daylight but not enough to outshine the ambient light so they re most noticeable under a black light in an otherwise dark space Phosphorescence is a lot like fluorescence but stretched out over time a slow glow

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/cleap/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Carolyn S | BEYONDbones
    was a spectacular eclipse with Mars nearby to the right and Saturn off to the left Both planets were very bright and easy to identify The star near the Moon and just off the field of these images was Spica in the constellation Virgo Posted in Science Tagged april 2014 eclipse Blood Moon entering eclipse lunar eclipse Mars moon saturn spica Leave a reply The blood moon in Houston Stay up late at the George for a stunning celestial show Published by Carolyn S on April 8 2014 at 11 10 am in Astronomy Reply A total eclipse of the Moon will occur very early Tuesday morning April 15 Houstonians will be able to see the whole event which begins just before 1 a m You ll be able to see the evening s cosmic events unfold even under city lights but if you d like a more detailed and dare I say captivating look at the eclipse the George Observatory will be open all night long Lunar eclipses occur when the full Moon moves into the Earth s shadow The first part of the Earth s shadow that the Moon will encounter is the penumbra The penumbral shadow s faintness means that sharp eyed observers will notice only a slight dimming of the Moon between 11 55 p m on Monday night and 12 58 a m Tuesday The Moon moves into the darkest part of the earth s shadow the umbra at 12 58 a m and will be totally eclipsed by 2 06 a m The Moon s brightness during a total eclipse depends on the amount of dust particles in the atmosphere A large amount of dust from a volcanic eruption for example can make the totally eclipsed Moon almost invisible With little dust in our atmosphere the Moon glows reddish orange during totality This is because only the Sun s red light comes through the Earth s atmosphere and falls on the Moon even while it is in the Earth s shadow As the diagram shows the Moon will pass through the southern part of the shadow for about 78 minutes of totality As a result the northern limb closer to the center of Earth s shadow will appear darker We ll see our next total lunar eclipse in Houston just before dawn on October 8 2014 the second of four occurring between 2014 and 2015 For more on how lunar eclipses work watch the video below from NASA and USA Today Posted in Astronomy Tagged Astronomy Blood Moon george observatory Light Waves Lunar Eclispe moon penumbra total lunar eclipse umbra Leave a reply The X Planets Exploring the consequences of another Earth Published by Carolyn S on March 4 2013 at 11 54 am in Astronomy Reply When you look up at the night sky do you ever think you re seeing other solar systems Do you ever wonder if any of the stars you see have planets like Earth in orbit around them

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/csumners/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Celeste | BEYONDbones
    beetle specimen display you can visit in the CBC entomology hall Celeste Celeste is the butterfly rearing coordinator She breeds and raises butterflies for the CBC Her staff pick is Charro the CBC s resident iguana Charro is a Green Iguana Iguana iguana Despite this name he is actually bright orange Green Iguanas can be a variety of colors depending on what region they come from Charro can be found relaxing in his enclosure in the rainforest or sunning himself outside the butterfly center by the demo garden After hours Charro gets to wander the entire rainforest freely Don t worry about the butterflies Charro is strictly vegetarian Celeste sits with Charro the iguana who resides inside the CBC rainforest Next time you visit the CBC make sure to check out all these staff picks and take time to pick YOUR favorite part of the CBC Posted in Entomology Plants Insects Zoology Tagged beetles butterflies Butterfly Caterpillar Charro chrysalids chrysalis Cockrell Butterfly Center eastern lubber grasshopper iguana pride of trinidad spicebush caterpillar vinegaroon Leave a reply Top 5 Most Frequently Asked Questions in the Cockrell Butterfly Center Published by Celeste on August 14 2015 at 3 02 pm in Education Reply The Cockrell Butterfly Center CBC strives to bring the natural world to within the public s reach Visitors enjoy tropical plants and exotic animals exhibited throughout the indoor rainforest insect zoo and practical entomology hall and as they wander through the CBC they re sure to ask tons of questions To keep you informed we ve compiled a list of the top five most frequently asked questions about the CBC and answered them below Take a look Q Is that real A It depends on what you are asking about Usually this question is asked about the chrysalids hanging in the emergence chamber In that case the answer is yes All the chrysalids you see are real We receive between 800 and 1 000 chrysalids per week The chrysalids are carefully glued up so the butterflies can emerge in a natural position If you look carefully you may see the chrysalids wiggling You can also observe the freshly emerged butterflies drying their wings Twice a day we collect the butterflies with fully dry wings and release them into the CBC rainforest On Wednesdays until Labor Day weekend you can watch how we do it during our Wing It presentation These chrysalids are real Soon butterflies will emerge from each one When this question is about the plants in the Rainforest Conservatory the answer is also yes but with one exception All the plants are real except for the huge central tree This tree contains the rainforest s air circulation system All others are living plants that are meticulously cared for by our staff horticulturalist Soni Holladay Each plant is labeled so keep a lookout for a coffee tree chocolate tree pride of Trinadad pineapple plants miracle berry bush and a variety of beautiful orchids Before and after the completion of CBC construction All the plants in the CBC are real with the exception of the large central tree Q How many butterflies are there in here A We keep a collection of more than 1 500 live butterflies in the CBC rainforest at all times It may seem like more or less depending on how active the butterflies are The butterflies are most likely to be actively flying and feeding when there is bright sunlight and warm weather During these times the whole rainforest feels like it s fluttering around you Early in the morning or in cooler overcast weather many of the butterflies will be quietly roosting underneath leaves During these times a sharp eye will allow you to spot the sleeping butterflies all around you Take this time to enjoy the variety of colors and patterns that are more easily discernible on butterfly wings that aren t flying Owl butterflies however are active at dusk You can watch hundreds of them swirling in our rainforest during our limited availability event An Evening With Owls coming in September Shhhhhhhhhh They re sleeping Look for roosting butterflies hanging from leaves next time you visit the CBC Q Where do the butterflies come from A We receive the butterflies in their pupal form chrysalis through the mail Each week we import up to 1 000 live chrysalids from butterfly farms in Central and South America Southeast Asia and Africa We also raise a small portion of the butterflies in the greenhouses on the top level of the parking garage We receive up to 150 different species of butterflies throughout the year Use the butterfly identification guides as you enter the rainforest to help you identify some of our most common species Our butterflies are shipped from farms all over the world Q What do the butterflies eat A The CBC rainforest is always full of a variety of flowering plants Most butterflies feed on nectar Watch the butterflies visiting the blooms and you will notice them extending their proboscis into the center of the flower They use this mouth part like a straw to draw up the nectar Supplementary food is provided for the nectar feeders in feeding stations filled with artificial nectar Artificial nectar is made from a mixture of water sugar and amino acids It is soaked into sponges that the butterflies can visit to get an extra snack But not all butterflies feed on nectar Some prefer the juices from rotten fruit or tree sap For the fruit feeders we provide banana brew fermenting bananas sugar and beer mixture as well as slices of over ripe fruit Butterflies are also known to feed on some less savory substances such and dead animals and feces A butterfly uses its proboscis to sip nectar from a flower Fun fact butterflies also get essential nutrients by feeding on feces and carrion Q How long do the butterflies live A It depends Most butterflies are not long lived The average life

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/cpoorte/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Christine | BEYONDbones
    of food chains from our coast on it One side has the trophic levels on it and the other three sides have example food chains What s on the bottom of the pyramid The Sun of course Coastal ecology isn t just about sand shells and dodging gulls It s also about the interactions between plants animals and their environment The plants anchor the dunes the dunes protect and replenish the beach sand the sand houses animals like mole crabs and mantis shrimp and we get to enjoy it when we protect it If tracking home beach sand in your shoes car towels and suits doesn t excite you our new Hamman Hall of Coastal Ecology may be just the air conditioned trip to the coast you need on a scorching summer day in Texas Members come join us Memorial Day weekend to see wonders of the Texas coastline Posted in Coastal Ecology Malacology Zoology Tagged apex predator Coast crustaceans ecology food web Hamman Hall of Coastal Ecology malacology mollusks snails Strake Hall of Malacology texas trophic levels wildlife Leave a reply Just another day at HMNS Angry rattlesnakes gecko cooling and non stop learning in the Education Department Published by Christine on August 17 2012 at 4 12 pm in Education Reply The conversation starts innocently enough So how was your day asks my husband Well I say the short version goes like this After I spent an hour with my arms held over my head wedged inside the gecko tank to extend its misting system I asked my Director of Education to help me transfer our very large and angry rattlesnake so I could clean out his tank After I scrubbed out the rattlesnake tank we wrangled him back in again Then I think I paid some standard bills fruit flies crickets you know the basics Oh but the best part was during my test dissection of an owl pellet for an upcoming class when I found an entire bird skull in the pellet It was so cool How was your day My husband pauses to let all of that to sink in and finally says Fine Another pause Did you say angry rattlesnake You didn t touch it did you Well So begins another conversation about my day to day with an incredulous spouse I assure him once again that yes all of that is in my job description And it doesn t even begin to scratch the surface when you think about the Overnights Teacher Workshops Outreach Programs or overarching if you don t know ask Education requests our Department solves daily One thing is for sure it s never routine and there s never a dull moment To learn more about HMNS Education Department what it does and the amazing programming it offers click here Posted in Education Tagged Education HMNS houston museum of natural science owl pellets venomous snakes Zoology Leave a reply Road Trip Published by Christine on July 21 2009 at 2

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/cbattan/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Dan | BEYONDbones
    scene in the Peanuts Christmas special when Charlie Brown buys the measly little tree that gives out and all but dies Then his buddies come and pour some TLC into the tree and make it pretty cool after all After returning to the U S I went to visit Nancy Simmons a Micronycteris specialist at the American Museum of Natural History to see if she was able to designate the specimen to species level Simmons suggested it likely represented a new species most closely allied to the Micronycteris sanborni group So I put out the word to other bat scientists working in Bolivia to be on the lookout for this unique little bat After several years we were finally able to find someone else who netted some of the unique little bats Liz Siles Many years and much work later we were finally able to describe the new species fully in a recent article in the Journal of Mammalogy After some discussion we decided to name this species Yates big eared bat Micronycteris yatesi after our late colleague Terry Yates of the University of New Mexico and the National Science Foundation The etymology reads This species is named in honor of Terry Lamon Yates 1950 2007 for his pivotal contributions to the knowledge of Bolivian mammals training Bolivian biologists and starting collaborations that strengthened mammalian research and shaped current science and field biology in Bolivia Since the big eared bat find in Bolivia it is really spectacular to see how far the main players have come Julieta Hugo and José Manuel were fairly young and green mammalogists at the time today they have their own career trajectories Julieta ultimately became Curator of Mammals at the National Museum in La Paz Hugo went on to direct a program for the highly endangered Wattled Curassow Crax globulsa in Bolivia read here for an account on this rare species And my dear hermano boliviano José Manuel became increasingly involved in human sustainable living now working on these projects in rural Bolivia As for myself it was overwhelming how much I was able to accomplish in my career as a result of this trip From the REA I was able to describe two new species of mammals a rice rat and the bat got three wonderful mammalogy grad students working in Bolivia and published some great manuscripts on the birds and mammals of this unique region Sometimes life taps you on the shoulder to take a chance Even though I wasn t able to administer my own finals or go to my field site in Peru that spring this one in a million chance of a lifetime was irreplaceable VERY glad I took the chance to stray off the beaten path Posted in Zoology Tagged bat bat netting big eared bat bolivia Micronycteris Micronycteris yatesi neotropics south america Terry Yates 1 Reply Working from zero How exchange programs and scientific sleuthing fuel our Department of Vertebrate Zoology Published by Dan on December 23 2012 at 10 05 am in Zoology Reply Our collection focus in the Department of Vertebrate Zoology is dictated by both our exhibits and current areas of research We are heavily vested in birds and mammals and herps to a lesser extent from Texas yeehaw Africa and Latin America as well as globally threatened endangered species that transcend political boundaries Tightly correlated with this latter category are some of the exotic pheasants sadly rare in nature due to their capacity to feed hungry families in otherwise impoverished areas The majority of the planet s pheasants come from Asia although it s not a continent the collection focuses on per se the fact that most pheasants are threatened endangered makes them a targeted focal group for our collection However Asian Bird Flu virus has all but shut down all export of birds from Asia Consequently we rely heavily on the captive stocks of zoos and private game breeders to build our synoptic series of pheasants We have managed to build a respectable collection of most genera and at least 35 different species although there are still a few species we are lacking which can only be obtained through exchange programs with other museums Such exchange programs are difficult to get off the ground for a number of primarily bureaucratic reasons Nevertheless one of the many exciting developments in Vertebrate Zoology this year is a new exchange program with a large museum in the northeast The Museum provides them with data rich specimens that we already have represented in our collection and they in turn provide us with study skins to help fill various gaps In terms of our current pheasant holdings we currently have all species but one in the cases of junglefowl Gallus and peacock pheasants Polyplectron which are very different from peafowl Pavo and tragopans Tragopan In the latter case we were fortunate to recently receive a beautiful adult male specimen of the Western Tragopan Tragopan melanocephalus through the above mentioned exchange program Unfortunately the specimen arrived with very little information For example was it collected from the wild or hatched in captivity Although this seems trivial knowing this information can mean the difference between a specimen that is valuable in studies dealing with biogeography and systematics versus one that is only useful to make drawings from or is just something pretty to look at This is where detective work comes in handy such as the sleuthing highlighted in my blog dealing with Col Richard Meinertzhagen Between the tags on the specimen and data at the bottom of the online catalog I was able to glean the following information The specimen was cataloged on Oct 3 1908 Either the species or specimen was from northern India obtained from the private collection of Tristam First I needed to determine if the specimen was collected from the wild or hatched in captivity The late Jean Delacour was a fascinating individual who was very interested in a broad array of topics dealing with

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/dbrooks/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Daniel | BEYONDbones
    look into the future and for funnel cake Published by Daniel on October 15 2015 at 6 00 am in Education Reply What do funnel cakes and energy have in common That s not a question most people ask Thankfully there s an easy answer and that s Houston s Energy Day this Saturday Oct 17 from 11 a m to 4 p m Houston s Energy Day is the largest free family festival focused on STEM Science Technology Engineering and Math and they also have funnel cakes for sale It s a huge festival down in Sam Houston Park near the Heritage Society Museum You can expect lots of awesome booths with fun activates and giveaways and something fun for everybody At the Navy booth you can drive an underwater remotely operated vehicle ROV around a swimming pool You can explore the interior of a NISSAN Leaf electric car NASA will be on site for cool giveaways and both the Houston Rockets and the Houston Astros will have booths so you can shoot some hoops and play a game of catch though probably not at the same time In addition to all the fun activities there will be an award ceremony for the winners of several contests that have been going on during the year such as The Houston Geological Society Houston Museum of Natural Science Consumer Energy Alliance Art Essay Media Contests Winning students and teachers will receive scholarship money and a photo holding the big check Live music will play between the award ceremonies Alongside all the festivities and funnel cakes our museum will be there of course I ll be playing with a Van de Graaf generator shocking I know we ll have a cast of some dinosaur bones for you to touch and much much more So sleep in that Saturday and in the late morning head down to Sam Houston Park for a free fun filled festival See you there In the meantime take a look at the rest of these other images from Energy Day in previous years Posted in Education Outreach Science Tagged Education Energy Day energy industry engineering Foucault Pendulum mayor of Houston Science STEM technology wiess energy hall Leave a reply April is here Get Ready to Celebrate Earth Day all month long in Houston Published by Daniel on April 4 2015 at 6 00 am in Energy Reply Well it s that time of year again Happy April everyone With the April flowers come Earth Day celebrations While the official Earth Day is April 22 Houstonians like to celebrate Earth Day every weekend in April Even better all these Earth Day events are free Start out the month by bringing your recyclables to Discovery Green April 4th is a recycling Saturday Spend the day downtown or around Hermann Park maybe even at HMNS and end your day at the Miller Outdoor Theater watching Legally Blonde the Musical not Earth Day centered but still fun and free April 11th is

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/dburch/ (2016-02-12)
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  • David | BEYONDbones
    about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from David Temple the museum s curator of paleontology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating fossils in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Early Insectivore Pholidocercus hassiacus We are fortunate to have a few fossils from the Messel Pit in the Museum s collection Located near Darmstadt Germany the quarry was originally a pit mine for oil shale Abandoned when the mine no longer was profitable plans were made to convert the pit to a landfill The site was eventually saved and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO because of the spectacular number and preservation of the fossils found there During the Eocene the quarry was a deep lake The lake bottom an anoxic silty ooze was toxic to bottom dwelling fauna With nearly 50 million years of hindsight the inhospitable waters created an environment that guaranteed dead animals which had drifted to the lake floor were not scavenged and their remains mixed by the daily activities of bottom dwelling animals The lake accumulated the remains of algae bacteria insects spiders fishes reptiles amphibians birds and mammals potentially anything calling the lush tropical forest home A dark side to the fossil accumulation was spurred by releases of Co2 and hydrogen sulfide from the lake that poisoned and suffocated large numbers of animals living near the lake One of the most famous recent Messel fossils to come to light is Darwinius masillae or Ida an early primate This early relative of a hedge hog was covered with bristle hairs similar to modern hedge hogs but had scales on its head and tail Traces of the bristle hairs can be seen as a faint black silhouette around the fossil The stomach contents are also preserved and visible This perfect articulation of the skeleton and the tantalizingly preserved traces of soft tissue point to a quick burial absent of scavenging and bioturbation a hallmark of the unique preservation found at the Messel Pit Wander among prehistoric beasts in the Paleontology Hall a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org Posted in Paleontology Tagged 100 years 100 objects Darwinius masillae Eocene Eocene era eocene period evolution Ida pholidocercus hassiacus prehistoric animals preserving artifacts preserving objects 1 Reply 100 Years 100 Objects Spadefoot Toad Published by David on December 28 2009 at 11 03 am in Paleontology Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/dtemple/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Deserae | BEYONDbones
    at our Museum is just plain easy From booking to the party itself we are with you every step of the way Your rooms will be set up and ready to go and your party coordinator will even meet you at your car to help bring in any items you may have The coordinator will also keep everything running smoothly and on schedule so you do not have to worry about a thing And best of all we clean up everything SOMETHING FOR THE SCRAPBOOK Our venue offers one of the most unique birthday experiences in town From taking a walk through our tropical rainforest in the Cockrell Butterfly Center greeting ancient Egyptian mummies seeing out of this world shows in the Burke Baker Planetarium or roaring with our dinosaurs in the Morian Hall of Paleontology our parties are one of a kind memorable experiences REALLY WOW THOSE SOCCER MOMS AND THE KIDS TOO OF COURSE If you are looking for a way to personalize your party even more we offer a range of add ons and options including our Deluxe parties for the super fans to make your party the hit of the neighborhood Whether you want to add party bags to go with your theme a live animal presentation face painter balloon artist or even our astonishing magician we can help you get the party you really really want EDUCATIONAL OR FUN WHY NOT BOTH Our parties are both entertaining and educational Instead of the same old party where the children spend the entire time running around why not try us and see how we make learning fun For more information or to book your party today send an email to birthdays at hmns dot org replace at and dot with the appropriate symbols or visit HMNS org Happy partying you party smarties Posted in Party Smarty Tagged birthday birthday parties for kids in houston Birthday Party dinosaurs kid friendly kids Party Smarty planetarium Leave a reply Search Category List Anthropology 135 Archaeology 16 Astronomy 225 Behind the Scenes 25 Bulgari 130 Years of Masterpieces 4 Chemistry 9 Coastal Ecology 8 Distinguished Lectures 55 Education 250 Egyptology 34 Energy 87 Entomology 14 Fabergé A Brilliant Vision 12 Food 11 Geek Holidays 6 Gems Minerals 29 George Observatory 25 Giant Screen Theatre 67 Giving 4 HMNS Happenings 84 HMNS Sugar Land 35 Lucy s Legacy 36 Magna Carta 4 Malacology 6 Maya 2012 3 Mixers Elixirs 8 Museum Store 27 Outreach 20 Paleontology 196 Party Smarty 11 Plants Insects 226 React Interact 11 Science 491 Scouts 15 Special Events 34 Special Exhibitions 28 STEM GEMS 15 World Trekkers 5 Zoology 86 Tags 100 years 100 objects Anthropology archaeology big dipper bob bakker bugs butterflies Butterfly Dimetrodon dinosaur dinosaurs Education Energy entomology evolution fossils gems george observatory Giant Screen Theatre Hall of Ancient Egypt Houston houston museum of natural science insects jupiter lois Lucy Mars moon Morian Hall of Paleontology museum NASA night sky orion photography planets preserving artifacts preserving

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/dturk/ (2016-02-12)
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