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  • Jennifer | BEYONDbones
    carving this labradorite skull was hand carved in Madagascar from a solid block of labradorite and flashes light and rich colors from different angles Reminiscent of momento mori and Victorian headstone carvings f is for frank s cast pewter skull ring is the work of Texas sculptors Shoshannah Frank and Casey Melton Our newest artist is Ashley Lyons of New Orlean s Porter Lyons Her Voodoo collection pays homage to the history and customs behind the religion that was so much a part of New Orleans Creole culture Her Baron Samedi earrings reference the loa who is the spirit of both death and resurrection There is beauty and art in science as shown by x ray artist Hugh Turvey Turvey uses industrial x rays to photograph not just skeletons but also the bones of everyday objects Designer Michael Revil Madjus also captures the beauty of the human skull with his x ray pillow We love to see the natural world transformed into art so even if skulls and skeletons aren t your thing we have intriguing items from a wide range of artists and designers both in store and online at museumstore hmns org And 100 of store proceeds benefits the museum and its educational programming ChillsAtHMNS Posted in Museum Store Tagged f is for frank hugh turvey porter lyons brassthread cabinet of curiosities Damien Hirst Dia de los Muertos earrings Harold van Pelt labradorite museum store skulls Leave a reply Handpicked gems meet gold vermeil at Tummino s Trunk Show Published by Jennifer on July 29 2015 at 6 00 am in Museum Store Reply Native Texan Mirta Tummino discovered her talent for jewelry design while working for a Fortune 500 company in Chicago Her part time design and metalsmithing studies at the Lillstreet Art Center quickly became a passion when she started selling her one of a kind designs in Chicago area boutiques Lariat necklace multiple gems As demand grew Mirta was able to fulfill her true calling and become a full time artist Moving back to her native Houston opened new opportunities for her collection and she soon realized her colorful gemstone jewels were a perfect fit for the museum with the world s finest gem and mineral collection Handpicking her stones Mirta complements classic gems like aquamarine labradorite and blue topaz with the less common kyanite Russian amazonite and black opal Each stone is delicately wire wrapped in sterling or gold vermeil to create an intricately precise bezel Amazonite necklace Mirta will make an artist appearance Friday Aug 7 from 10 to 4 p m at the Houston Museum of Natural Science Museum Store The entire Mirta Tummino collection will be 20 off the day of the show plus membership discounts Feel good about looking great knowing that 100 of museum store and trunk show proceeds benefits HMNS educational programs Posted in Museum Store Science Tagged amazonite aquamarine black opal blue topaz gold vermeil kyanite labradorite Mirta Tummino museum store Trunk Show Leave a reply Trunk

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/jking/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Joel | BEYONDbones
    Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org Posted in Gems Minerals Tagged 100 years 100 objects gems gems and minerals kunzite minerals preserving artifacts preserving objects spodumene Leave a reply 100 Years 100 Objects Zoisite Published by Joel on December 16 2009 at 11 34 am in Gems Minerals Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Zoisite var tanzanite Merelani Hills near Arusha Umba Valley Tanzania This magnificent near flawless crystal of tanzanite the gemstone variety of the mineral zoisite was found in Tanzania in 1991 As seen here the specimen is an exceptional example of trichroism whereby the same crystal exhibits three distinctly different colors depending on the viewing angle Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org Posted in Gems Minerals Tagged 100 years 100 objects crystals gems HMNS minerals preserving artifacts preserving objects tanzanite trichroism zoisite Leave a reply 100 Year 100 Objects Beryl Published by Joel on December 11 2009 at 11 11 am in Gems Minerals Reply The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now For this yearlong series our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/jbartsch/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Josh | BEYONDbones
    area is slowly losing its dark skies This is unfortunate and not just for those of us who love to stargaze Too much light at night is also bad for animal migrations human sleep patterns and even personal safety So what can we as individuals do to fight light pollution Here are five simple things 1 Turn off all unused lights Your dad was right leaving lights on when you re not using them is just throwing money away So when you leave an area make it a habit to turn the lights off 2 Shield all outside lights Outside lights should serve one purpose to show you where you re going So why do so many people insist on lighting the underside of passing airplanes We encourage you to invest in light shields They will help with light pollution and save you money 3 Don t over light When installing outside fixtures consider the best wattage for your needs You want enough light to see where you are going anything else isn t helping you see Also your neighbors will appreciate you not flooding their bedrooms with light 4 Avoid ornamental lighting It s wonderful that you re proud of your home but remember what we said about light pollution and crime When you overuse ornamental light you may feel like your house is more secure however you re actually making your property a target for thieves 5 Spread the word Now that you know the dangers of light pollutions share that information with others There are many websites that will help you and your friends protect the night sky like the International Dark Sky Association Knowledge is power and we all need to do our part to keep the stars at night big and bright deep in the heart of Texas To see the best dark skies in the Houston area come out to the George Observatory From there you can see stars galaxies planets almost anything in space And what s more we want to help you see everything out there better so bring your telescope out for our telescope classes The next one s coming up this Saturday May 3 from 5 p m to 7 p m Posted in Astronomy Tagged Dark skies george observatory light pollution telescope telescope classes 2 Replies Stay up late for a great cosmic show The first eclipse of April 2014 is tonight Published by Josh on April 14 2014 at 1 52 pm in Astronomy 3 Don t forget there s a lunar eclipse tonight The eclipse will begin shortly before midnight and continue until 4 30 in the morning on April 15 You ll be able to see the eclipse from just about everywhere in Houston but especially well at the George Observatory where you can watch through telescopes away from city lights We ve been getting a lot of people asking What exactly is a lunar eclipse Well a lunar eclipse is when the Moon passes into

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/jrohn/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Julia | BEYONDbones
    a reply Late Night with Catalysts New program offers after hours fun for the young at heart Published by Julia on August 4 2015 at 3 17 pm in Outreach Reply When I tell people I m the Overnight Coordinator at the Houston Museum of Natural Science I usually get one of two reactions It s either a sarcastic Oh does everything come to life at night or an astounded People can spend the night there While I m in the Youth Education Programs department and typically work with the kiddos we decided to partner with the Catalysts young professionals group at HMNS to create a late night event for the young at heart On July 30 we had our first ever adult late night at HMNS exclusively for the Catalysts group The museum up late From left to right Emily Lutz Elizabeth Marlowe Jayme Schlimper in the bear mask Matti Hammett Kelli Lozada Nicole Temple Julia Russell Kelsey Friedemann Madison Weinhoffer Katie Conlan and Sahil Patel Since it s summertime we decided to take everyone on a trip down memory lane to good ol summer camp Of course we had to make it a trip with a bit of that HMNS pizzazz Late nighters could roast s mores in our toaster ovens as an indoor and flameless spin on everyone s favorite campfire cuisine We had a make your own trail mix bar complete with barbecue flavored mealworms as an optional but delicious addition We also had some Cool Chemistry demonstrations by seasoned Outreach presenter Sahil Patel and flashlight led tours of the Morian Hall of Paleontology with Connor Eichenwald from the museum s W T Louise J Moran Ecoteen Program Finally if campers wanted to capture the moment we had Smilebooth there with a bevy of youth ed crafted camp themed props See some of our favorite snapshots below If a summer camp themed late night sounds like your idea of a night well spent then Catalysts is the group for you Our young professionals group gives you access to a variety of events throughout the year including tickets to an exclusive Catalysts events each quarter and tickets to our Mixers and Elixirs events during the summer That s on top of the usual membership benefits like free access to our renowned permanent exhibition halls and advance notice of upcoming events and special exhibitions Visit our Catalysts Web page to join today From left to right Christine Dubbert Sahil Patel Madison Weinhoffer and Daniel Echeverri From left to right Clark Kellogg Nicole Temple and Allison Kellogg and Sahil Patel again Top left to right Julia Russell Zack Kammer Hunter Robinson bear mask and Dalia Rihani Bottom from left Britt Baumgardner and Freddy Dabaghi Dain Geist and Rachel Wilkinson Morgan and Elizabeth Hann Posted in Outreach Special Events Tagged Catalysts ecoteens Education late night mixers and elixirs Moran Ecoteen Program Morian Hall of Paleontology outreach overnight programs sahil patel smilebooth summer camp Leave a reply Saltwater SWAT team Top 5 fascinating shark hunting techniques Published by Julia on May 19 2015 at 3 31 pm in Coastal Ecology Reply I ve been entranced by sharks since I was a little kid From the first time I saw Jaws I was hooked pun intended There are so many aspects of a shark s physiology I admire but my favorite point of fascination is probably the variety of hunting techniques they use to capture their prey Though most of my friends are aware of my sharktastic obsession others are surprised because I m well a vegetarian Yes I m a vegetarian with an intense interest and dare I say admiration for this aquatic carnivore s feeding habits This animal s intelligence grace stealth and prowess are unparalleled on land except maybe when J J Watt is playing for the Texans When people hear the word shark they typically picture mindless killing machines but they couldn t be further from the truth Sharks have highly adapted hunting strategies that have been honed over millions of years to make them one of the most efficient predators on the planet Here is my own personal countdown of the most fascinating shark hunting methodologies Mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus Photo credit 5 Mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus Mako sharks are one of only a few shark species that are technically endothermic meaning they are able to maintain a fairly high internal body temperature roughly seven to 10 degrees above that of the water around them This high body temperature gives them the energy they need to maintain a constant swimming speed of up to 35 miles per hour and bursts of speed of up to 70 miles per hour The symmetry of their caudal fin also helps them maintain these high speeds Due to this unique adaptation Mako sharks are the fastest shark species out there making them a lethal predator Though they ll eat a number of different oceanic species including cephalopods dolphins and sea turtles they can also chase down some of the fastest schooling fish in the sea like tuna and swordfish Whale shark Rinchodon typus Photo credit 4 Whale shark Rinchodon typus Whale sharks get bragging rights as the largest fish species in the world And while they can grow more than 40 feet in length their food of choice is plankton That s right ladies and gentlemen the largest fish species in the world feeds on tiny plankton As a filter feeder they swim through the ocean with their mouths wide open to filter out these delicious little morsels and any other small fish that make the mistake of getting in the way Getting out of the way isn t always the easiest feat though since a whale shark s mouth can open to almost five feet wide 3 Bull shark Carcharhinus leucas The bull shark is definitely a contender when it comes to most fascinating hunting techniques One of the main reasons for this is its increased territory and hunting ground

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/julia/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Kelly | BEYONDbones
    families can visit three cultures under one roof at the Houston Museum of Natural Science As you enter the Museum Saluki dogs will greet you to acquaint you with an ancient breed beloved by the Bedouin Hands on activities for children will compare the nomadic life of the Bedouin people to the Native American tribe of the Comanche and the Texas cowboy two of the nomadic cultures of Texas All three groups share similar needs of nomadic people such as portability of their belongings tent shelters as protection from the natural elements a need to hunt for food and a reliance on animals for transportation and companionship Be sure to arrive early Early arrivals will have the chance to see a team erect the Bedouin tent at 9 00 a m the covered wagon being brought into the Museum at 9 30 and then watch as a Native American group erects the tipi beginning around 10 a m Attendees will really have an understanding of how nomadic groups traveled and what was involved in the creation of encampments Celebrate the rodeo at the Museum Tour a Bedouin tent outfitted by the Saudi Consulate a Native American tipi and a cowboy covered wagon from the American Cowboy Museum to discover shelters Excavate at prepared archaeological digs to discover how archaeologists learn about the past Participate in crafts and science activities Visit cultural corners to see demonstrations of horse gear cowboy roping and Native American arrow head construction and drumming Discover animals used by nomadic groups for hunting and protection See a raptor and pet Saluki dogs a ancient breed and a living antiquity Dr Carolyn Willekes director of the event is a renowned expert on the archaeology of the horse particularly the Arabian horse Dr Willekes is in charge of educational outreach at Spruce Meadows in Alberta Canada one of the world s largest horse shows and also participates in educational activities at the Calgary Stampede one of the world s largest rodeos This event is generously underwritten by Aramco Services Company with additional assistance from the Royal Consulate of Saudi Arabia and the American Cowboy Museum Posted in HMNS Happenings Tagged archaeology bedouin comanche cowboy museum rodeo saluki Science tent texas tipi wagon Leave a reply F stops and Fabergé Getting snap happy at HMNS Pixel Parties Published by Kelly on December 14 2014 at 7 00 am in Fabergé A Brilliant Vision 1 After hours at the Museum on November 2 we had another one of our exclusive Pixel Parties where we open select exhibits just for photographers both amateur and professional This time around we gave our photographers access to our newly re opened Fabergé From a Snowflake to an Iceberg exhibit And here s a sampling of what they gave us in return Photo by Kirsten Tucker Photo by Eddie Abbott Imagery Photo by Dwayne Fortier Photo by James Woody Photo by Allison Buchtien Photo by Reed s Photography To see more photos from around the museum

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/krusso/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Kelsey | BEYONDbones
    me up for Xplorations year after year HMNS What was your favorite class What made it your favorite Any stories from that class SL My favorite class was Wizard Science Academy Reading Harry Potter was a big part of my childhood so it was very exciting to be able to attend a summer camp that incorporated science with a Hogwarts twist I still remember dissecting an owl pellet and being convinced it was from Hedwig I remember having Nicole Temple as my teacher and being so excited that she secretly let me switch out of the house that the Sorting Hat chose for me into the house of my choice HMNS What is your favorite memory from summer camp SL I took a camp called Thrills Chills and Disasters that talked all about physics and the science behind amusement parks As an end of the week field trip that wrapped up all our learning we were able to go to Astroworld to see the physics in action I loved going around and riding rides with all of my camp friends It was such a unique opportunity that I am lucky to have had HMNS If you could go back to Xplorations Summer Camp for one week this summer what class would you take and why SL I would definitely sign up for Bedazzled I have had the best time teaching that camp for the past few years I think the best part of Bedazzled is the Spa Day on Friday when campers get to dress as comfortable as they d like and pamper themselves for the day A day with magnetic nail polish and a nice relaxing mud mask Sign me up HMNS What made you decide to come back and work at HMNS SL When I was a camper the Xplorations staff was always so enthusiastic and fun to be around Because of them I never wanted to leave camp when my mom came to pick me up I wanted to keep the fun going and stay with them When I officially aged out of camp I knew I wanted to come back and make camp a positive experience for others just like the staff did for me HMNS How did the Xplorations Summer Camp influence your life SL During the summers HMNS has been my second home for as long as I can remember and the people I have met there have become like another family to me Some of the best friendships I have are with people I have met through Xplorations Thanks to Xplorations and its amazing staff I was able to meet and teach with fantastic teachers who inspired me to become a teacher myself The best part of Xplorations Summer Camp is the people you meet from the awesome campers to the fun loving TA s and teachers and the always cheerful and helpful education staff My best memories from camp are because of them Posted in Education Science Scouts Tagged bedazzled Boy Scouts Girl Scouts Harry Potter HMNS summer camp hogwarts sorting hat star wars summer camp wizard science academy xplorations Xplorations Summer camp Leave a reply Sahil Patel Legacy Camper Published by Kelsey on June 16 2015 at 6 00 am in Education Reply Once in a while the Houston Museum of Natural Science Xplorations program gives children so much enthusiasm about science that they never really leave the museum Sahil Patel discovered the museum as a child with the Xplorations program and moved on to become an Ecoteen as he grew older Now he is an HMNS Outreach Presenter and a writer for the BEYONDbones blog Patel teaches a children s class about the density of various items for the Science Start Outreach Program Interested in the Houston Museum of Natural Science since age 6 Patel hopes to share his excitement with other kids cultivating their education through HMNS HMNS When did you start attending summer camp here And why SP I started attending camp when I was six years old I didn t start going to school until Kindergarten but I would go to work with my mom every day Every day at lunch time we would go to either the zoo or the museum depending on weather and I was hooked The real reason I came to camp is probably so my mom could get me out of her office but I kept coming back because I just never had a bad time There wasn t a single class I didn t enjoy HMNS What was your favorite class What made it your favorite Any stories from that class SP Every summer I had to take the Space Commander class I must have taken it at least four times My favorite part was the Expedition Center mission to Mars or the Moon on Friday afternoon I loved it so much that I had a birthday party mission one year Every time I tried to be on a different team inside and was mostly successful My favorite of those had to be the CIMCOM team which got to talk to mission control Years later when I was a Moran Ecoteen I got to be a part of mission control for a summer camp mission and loved every second of that too As an Ecoteen in 2010 Patel interned with Paleontology Curator David Temple HMNS What is your favorite memory from summer camp SP I enjoyed the camps that used to take field trips one of my favorites was called Thrills and Chills and the physics based camp ended with a trip to Astroworld on Friday Sadly neither Thrills and Chills nor Astroworld still exist I also enjoyed the Senior Coastal Ecology class that would take daytrips to Galveston to study wildlife and various aspects of the gulf coast but this camp was discontinued in the late 2000 s But I d say my favorite memory was from when I took Crime Scene Investigators one year Friday afternoon of Crime Scene

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/kfriedemann/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Lauren W | BEYONDbones
    owls had begun roosting for the evening along with the other butterflies Photos were shot using a Nikon D90 camera on ISO 1600 with the snapshot fill flash Owl butterfly Jason Schaefer Owl butterfly Jason Schaefer Owl butterfly Jason Schaefer Owl butterfly Jason Schaefer You ll find other roosting butterflies there and camera ready like these two species below Zebra longwing butterflies roost together on a long hanging vine Jason Schaefer The underside of blue morpho butterflies have spots but don t confuse them for the owls Jason Schaefer Posted in Entomology HMNS Happenings Plants Insects Special Events Tagged an evening with owls caligo Cockrell Butterfly Center owl butterflies owl butterfly 1 Reply Hungry for Summer Recipes Try some bugs Published by Lauren W on June 23 2015 at 12 04 pm in Entomology 2 Why not put something super nutritious sustainable and oh so tasty on your grilling skewer this summer Oh did I mention it s a little leggy We are talking about cooking delicious insects Since my last blog concerning entomophagy a couple of years ago this unique eating experience has become quite popular Many companies are popping up all over the country bringing new ways to introduce insects into your diet Grasshopper Sheesh Kabobs by David George Gordon Insects are the new sushi As manager of our delicious edible insect vending machine in the Cockrell Butterfly Center I am constantly searching for new products to add to our inventory Besides quite a few new companies there are also several restaurants where finding a grasshopper in your fine cuisine will not result in a health code violation see the chapulines on Hugo s dinner menu You may think it s crazy but remember 50 years ago sushi was considered disgusting to most Americans Now there are almost 4 000 sushi restaurants in the US Add some legs to your diet When I took over the machine several years ago we sold mainly novelty products lollipops etc because that was what was available Now we are working with new startup companies to introduce more everyday use products I know I know most of you are more likely to stomp on a bug rather than chomp on a bug but the times they are a changing One of these companies that makes bug staples is Exo They make protein bars from cricket flour milled crickets Their Web site puts it perfectly CRICKETS ARE THE NEW KALE Paleo and environmentally friendly protein bars They are soy dairy grain and gluten free for all of you clean eaters out there I bet you never thought clean meant insects huh Sprinkle some of this Hopper Crunch cricket flour granola on yogurt with some fruit to make a bug parfait Another company Hopper Foods based in Austin Texas has the mission to normalize entomophagy eating insects by creating delicious nutritious and healthy products that people will want to eat every day Hopper has brought delicious crunchy cricket granola and no you won t get a leg stuck in your teeth Six Foods has created the next best thing to chips Chirps ha Get it Yup chips made from cricket flour along with wholesome beans corn peas and chia seeds from website In delicious flavors such as BBQ and Cheddar where could you go wrong Oh and they have the best slogan Eat what bugs you All the taste with 3x the protein and 40 less fat YES Bitty Foods makes cookies with yes again cricket flour are you sensing a trend yet They are delicious nutritious and did I mention delicious The secret to their recipes They start with sustainably raised crickets which are slow roasted to bring out their nutty toasted flavor Cricket Flours is not only a great place to get flour for your recipes but they also specialize in protein powders Also if you are looking for a new set of recipes you should buy their e book to get some ideas for your next dinner party Look for their single serve protein packets in our vending machine this summer Countries that consume insects and arthropods as a food source All the cool kids are doing it Like everyone is eating insects like 2 billion people kind of everyone That s not just very many that s A LOT So if you ve never eaten a bug get out and try a bite Heck you might like em Three Bee Salad by David George Gordon For more bug recipes check out these resources Girl Meets Bug On this blog learn how to make Bee LT Sandwiches Deep Fried Scorpion Waxworm Tacos and more Eat a Bug Cookbook Read here about David George Gordon s latest edition of his entomophagy cookbook and take away some recipes like Three Bee Salad and Grasshopper Sheesh Kabobs Purchase the book on Amazon Posted in Entomology Food Plants Insects Tagged bug recipes Cockrell Butterfly Center crickets eating bugs entomology entomophagy sustainability sustainable living 2 Replies Sure today s Columbus Day but it s also National Chocolate Covered Insects Day Published by Lauren W on October 14 2013 at 11 00 am in Plants Insects Reply The country at large may be celebrating Columbus Day but around these parts we salute National Chocolate Covered Insects Day too Yes we actually want you to eat bugs To help promote National Chocolate Covered Insect Day on Monday October 14 yes it s a real thing I thought a blog dedicated to entomophagy would be a great way to honor this oh so special day Entomophagy originates from the Greek word entomon insect and phagein to eat Yes entomophagy is the consumption of delicious nutritious insects and often other buggy friends Insects are at the bottom of the food chain and are eaten by many animals but the term entomophagy is directed at the human consumption of insects Other animals that feed on insects and insect relatives are commonly known as insectivores Did you know the Cockrell Butterfly Center

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/lwilliamson/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Melodie | BEYONDbones
    for pump up the volume and take a peek at this super hot video below See why Butter believes the ice sculpting business is a growing industry but a dying art And watch him hand sculpt a beautiful piece no software needed just the use of a powerful tool that he refers to as the extension of his hand Can t see the video Click here Check back soon for the rest of our video series spotlighting Big Bite Nite and the epic journey of food you will experience dished up by some of Houston s most prestigious restaurants Don t miss it Posted in Science Tagged Big Bite Nite DLG Ice Factory HMNS ice scuplting Ice scuptors Reverend Butter Leave a reply HMNS at Sugar Land Transforming a prison into a museum Published by Melodie on September 25 2009 at 9 31 am in Science Reply The building HMNS at Sugar Land will occupy was built in 1939 After the past six months I ve gained even more respect for our exhibits team at the Houston Museum of Natural Science I ve been fortunate enough to see first hand exactly what it takes to develop a museum formerly an old prison building built in 1939 Like you I usually see the exhibit when it is finished And I have to admit I never realized what challenging tasks the design and construction are I thought it was like decorating your home or office Okay maybe not that simple but a matter of knowing where you re going to put things and maybe knock out a wall or two pa rum pum pum pum you re done This photo was taken just a few months before exhibit construction started After going back and forth for a while now to visit the new museum in Sugar Land and seeing it in various stages of development I ve learned that designing a museum is more than dotting I s and crossing T s Because of the lengthy process my colleague Erin and I thought we could show you better than we could tell you which is why we have been recording the entire process As a precursor to the opening we thought we would show you an excerpt from the special video we are still currently producing In this segment you ll meet Rodney Gentry a senior designer for the Houston Museum of Natural Science Gentry tells us what he thought about the historical building when he first laid eyes on it as well as some of the obstacles the team faced when the museum was in its initial planning phase of development Plus you ll see some past photographs of the prison back in its heyday and some photos of what it looked like when we first took a look at the space Keep in mind it was filmed at the beginning of this week so the space is still transforming every day in preparation for the opening next Saturday It s

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/author/mwade/ (2016-02-12)
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